Muse: Changing The Way The World Thinks

Muse, InteraXon’s new brainwave-sensing headband, allows you to do more with your mind then ever thought possible. Visit our IndieGoGo crowdfunding campaign page for more details at indiegogo.com/interaxonmuse

UCLA/Caltech researchers help patients move mouse cursors with their brains Researchers were able to show that Earthlings  can “regulate the  activity of their neurons to intentionally alter the  outcome of  stimulation.” In other words, they were able to move a mouse  cursor  with just their mind, and brighten a test image with a 70 percent   success rate.

UCLA/Caltech researchers help patients move mouse cursors with their brains Researchers were able to show that Earthlings can “regulate the activity of their neurons to intentionally alter the outcome of stimulation.” In other words, they were able to move a mouse cursor with just their mind, and brighten a test image with a 70 percent success rate.

So here we are. 2030. “The Future.” We control our computers with our mind — which isn’t beyond the realm of reason — and displays are built right into our vision. The craziest part, though, is the idea that we’ll move away from silicon chips and toward biological computing: “The computer you inject is more likely to resemble a specialized virus than a tiny silicon chip.” As for that mind control, don’t put on your tin hat yet.

Computer  Chip Implant to Program Brain Activity, Treat Parkinson’s | Singularity  Hub
An international team of researchers led by Dr. Matti Mintz at the University of Tel Aviv is working on a biomimetic computer chip for brain stimulation that is programmable, responsive to neural activity, and capable of bridging broken connections in the brain. Called the Rehabilitation Nano Chip, or ReNaChip, the device could be used to replace diseased or damaged brain tissue, restore brain functions lost to aging, and even treat epilepsy. The chip is currently in animal testing, but should reach human applications within a few years.

Computer Chip Implant to Program Brain Activity, Treat Parkinson’s | Singularity Hub

An international team of researchers led by Dr. Matti Mintz at the University of Tel Aviv is working on a biomimetic computer chip for brain stimulation that is programmable, responsive to neural activity, and capable of bridging broken connections in the brain. Called the Rehabilitation Nano Chip, or ReNaChip, the device could be used to replace diseased or damaged brain tissue, restore brain functions lost to aging, and even treat epilepsy. The chip is currently in animal testing, but should reach human applications within a few years.