Inside The Largest Simulation Of The Universe Ever Created | Popular Science
Simulating Matter Distribution Across The Cosmos  Joe Insley and the HACC team, Argonne National Laboratory.
Sometime next month, the world’s third-fastest supercomputer —known as Mira—will complete tests of its new upgraded software and begin running the largest cosmological simulations ever performed at Argonne National Laboratory. These simulations are massive, taking in huge amounts of data from the latest generation of high-fidelity sky surveys and crunching it into models of the universe that are larger, higher-resolution, and more statistically accurate than any that have come before. When it’s done, scientists should have some amazing high-quality visualizations of the so-called “cosmic web” that connects the universe as we understand it. And they’ll have the best statistical models of the cosmos that cosmologists have ever seen.

Inside The Largest Simulation Of The Universe Ever Created | Popular Science

Simulating Matter Distribution Across The Cosmos Joe Insley and the HACC team, Argonne National Laboratory.


Sometime next month, the world’s third-fastest supercomputer —known as Mira—will complete tests of its new upgraded software and begin running the largest cosmological simulations ever performed at Argonne National Laboratory. These simulations are massive, taking in huge amounts of data from the latest generation of high-fidelity sky surveys and crunching it into models of the universe that are larger, higher-resolution, and more statistically accurate than any that have come before. When it’s done, scientists should have some amazing high-quality visualizations of the so-called “cosmic web” that connects the universe as we understand it. And they’ll have the best statistical models of the cosmos that cosmologists have ever seen.

Predicting Disasters Of The Future: Economic Disaster, Water Shortages, And Cyber Attacks 
A new report asking experts what disasters they’re afraid of has enough in it to make you hide under the bed. Bad news for optimists: The experts think global catastrophe is more likely than ever.






via fastcompany:

Predicting Disasters Of The Future: Economic Disaster, Water Shortages, And Cyber Attacks 

A new report asking experts what disasters they’re afraid of has enough in it to make you hide under the bed. Bad news for optimists: The experts think global catastrophe is more likely than ever.

via fastcompany:

Mineways turns your Minecraft creations into something you can hold | The Verge

New software called Mineways enables you to export your Minecraft creations into models and texture maps ready to send to a 3D printer. To do this, you’ll need an exported world map from Minecraft with your favorite design inside. Using a birds-eye view, you can then select the area you want to print, save it as a model, and then send it over to a 3D printing service like Shapeways. 

thisistheverge:

Largest-Ever Simulation of the Universe Revealed - Technology Review
The latest computer model of the cosmos involves 400 billion particles in a box about two thirds of the volume of the universe 
… Today, Juhan Kim at the Korea Institute for Advanced Study in Seoul,  and a few pals, show just how far this technique has come. These guys  have carried out the largest simulation of the universe ever undertaken,  consisting of 374 billion particles in a box some 10 gigaparsecs  across. That’s roughly equivalent to about two thirds the size of the  observable universe.
This took some 20 days of computing time on the Tachyonii  supercomputer in Korea, the 26th fastest in the world in the last set of  rankings.

Largest-Ever Simulation of the Universe Revealed - Technology Review

The latest computer model of the cosmos involves 400 billion particles in a box about two thirds of the volume of the universe

… Today, Juhan Kim at the Korea Institute for Advanced Study in Seoul, and a few pals, show just how far this technique has come. These guys have carried out the largest simulation of the universe ever undertaken, consisting of 374 billion particles in a box some 10 gigaparsecs across. That’s roughly equivalent to about two thirds the size of the observable universe.

This took some 20 days of computing time on the Tachyonii supercomputer in Korea, the 26th fastest in the world in the last set of rankings.

Autodesk bringing 3D modeling to the masses | CNET News
You may not know CAD, but if you’ve got a computer, you can now start creating 3D models.
That’s the idea behind 123D Catch and 123D Make, two new free software  applications that Autodesk is planning on releasing on Monday. The two  programs join the company’s existing iPad app, 123D Sculpt,  as part of a family of tools that are intended to give just about  anyone the ability not just to make their own 3D designs, but also to  get them produced as real, physical models.
Autodesk unveiled the two new applications at a press event at its  innovation center here today, making the argument that just about anyone  can now play the role of 3D modeler that has traditionally belonged to  CAD experts and other professional designers.
With 123D Catch, a user can take any digital camera and use it to  photograph a real-world object. By snapping a few dozen pictures from  angles all around the object and then uploading them to Autodesk’s  cloud-based system via the software, the user can within minutes get  back a 3D model of the object. Autodesk will process the model at no  charge.

Autodesk bringing 3D modeling to the masses | CNET News

You may not know CAD, but if you’ve got a computer, you can now start creating 3D models.

That’s the idea behind 123D Catch and 123D Make, two new free software applications that Autodesk is planning on releasing on Monday. The two programs join the company’s existing iPad app, 123D Sculpt, as part of a family of tools that are intended to give just about anyone the ability not just to make their own 3D designs, but also to get them produced as real, physical models.

Autodesk unveiled the two new applications at a press event at its innovation center here today, making the argument that just about anyone can now play the role of 3D modeler that has traditionally belonged to CAD experts and other professional designers.

With 123D Catch, a user can take any digital camera and use it to photograph a real-world object. By snapping a few dozen pictures from angles all around the object and then uploading them to Autodesk’s cloud-based system via the software, the user can within minutes get back a 3D model of the object. Autodesk will process the model at no charge.

IBM wants to create a virtual Portland » Coolest Gadgets
Last January, at CES, I witnessed a very interesting photo-realistic 3D-city visualization display from C3.   I got a chance to view San Francisco from the air through the power of  3D graphics, and IBM is now working on a project that is somewhat  similar.
The company’s Systems Dynamics for Smarter Cities is planning on  mapping out the city of Portland as mathematically as possible.  The end  result will be this massive “SimPortland” that is the product of 3,000  equations and constants inspired from the popular Oregon city.
So if you want to see what would happen if you change things in the  city, you can see it happen.  Like if you want to put in a new road,  then run it to the simulator to see how much it will mess with commuter  traffic.

IBM wants to create a virtual Portland » Coolest Gadgets

Last January, at CES, I witnessed a very interesting photo-realistic 3D-city visualization display from C3. I got a chance to view San Francisco from the air through the power of 3D graphics, and IBM is now working on a project that is somewhat similar.

The company’s Systems Dynamics for Smarter Cities is planning on mapping out the city of Portland as mathematically as possible. The end result will be this massive “SimPortland” that is the product of 3,000 equations and constants inspired from the popular Oregon city.

So if you want to see what would happen if you change things in the city, you can see it happen. Like if you want to put in a new road, then run it to the simulator to see how much it will mess with commuter traffic.


Kinect Hacked For 3-D Scanning Of Archaeology Site
University of California, San Diego students will be going to Jordan soon to take part in an archaeological dig that’s decidely futuristic: As they uncover artifacts and structures in the soil, they’ll be using high-quality 3-D scanning to record accurate positional details—rich data that could be incredibly useful in the future. Instead of using expensive and complex imaging systems like LIDAR, however, the team will use a hacked Microsoft Kinect to do the job for them.
Full Story: Fast Company

via emergentfutures:

Kinect Hacked For 3-D Scanning Of Archaeology Site

University of California, San Diego students will be going to Jordan soon to take part in an archaeological dig that’s decidely futuristic: As they uncover artifacts and structures in the soil, they’ll be using high-quality 3-D scanning to record accurate positional details—rich data that could be incredibly useful in the future. Instead of using expensive and complex imaging systems like LIDAR, however, the team will use a hacked Microsoft Kinect to do the job for them.

Full Story: Fast Company

via emergentfutures:

Innovative Computer Model Accurately Simulates Cell Behavior

In the most detailed simulation of its kind, a new computer model accurately replicates the behavior of a living bacterial cell.

When you were in high school biology, you probably had to build models of cells using poster board, gummy worms and glue. Now, researchers have created a much more accurate model—a computerized version that accurately simulates cell behavior.

The cell models were created by a collaborative team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Biology in Germany and the University of Illinois in Champaign, Ill. To build the models, they used the latest powerful graphics processing unit (GPU) computing technology. GPU technology is the same imaging tool behind video games and projects like radiation reduction for cancer patients.

"This is the first time that we’re modeling entire cells with the complete contents of the cellular cytoplasm represented," said University of Illinois postdoctoral researcher and lead author of the study Elijah Roberts in a statement. “We’re looking at the influence of the whole cellular architecture instead of modeling just a portion of the cell, as people have done previously.”

In the computer models of what are called “in silico cells,” the simulation accurately replicates the interior behavior of a cell reacting to sugar in its environment.

Source: Smarter Technology

(Go to original article)

TED 2011: Swedish Company Creates Flyovers in 3D

Source: Wired

What’s better than two-dimensional satellite images of Google Maps? How about photorealistic 3-D modeling of a flyover?

C3 Technologies, a Swedish spinoff of the aerospace and defense company Saab AB, has taken technology used by the Swedish military to guide missiles in real time and turned it into a commercial application for licensing. Using images captured by plane, the software converts the video into 3D models of a city, which can be overlaid with digital billboards, social networking comments and traditional mapping legends to call out landmarks and other sites. 

2009 Winter Outlooks for Temperature (left) and Precipitation (right) issued by NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center on October 15, 2009.
Bitter cold temperatures and blizzards of historic proportions prompted the questions: Why were there so many historic snowstorms in the mid-Atlantic region this winter? Are they evidence that global warming isn’t happening? No, the globe is warming. But the real story behind the mid-Atlantic’s winter isn’t about climate change, it’s about climate variability. Climate variability, the term scientists use, explains why record-breaking snowstorms and global warming can coexist. In fact, many of the weather events observed this winter help to confirm our understanding of the climate system, including links between weather and climate. 
ClimateWatch Magazine » Can Record Snowstorms & Global Warming Coexist?

2009 Winter Outlooks for Temperature (left) and Precipitation (right) issued by NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center on October 15, 2009.

Bitter cold temperatures and blizzards of historic proportions prompted the questions: Why were there so many historic snowstorms in the mid-Atlantic region this winter? Are they evidence that global warming isn’t happening? No, the globe is warming. But the real story behind the mid-Atlantic’s winter isn’t about climate change, it’s about climate variability. Climate variability, the term scientists use, explains why record-breaking snowstorms and global warming can coexist. In fact, many of the weather events observed this winter help to confirm our understanding of the climate system, including links between weather and climate. 

ClimateWatch Magazine » Can Record Snowstorms & Global Warming Coexist?