HGST’s Nanotechnology Printing Breakthrough Is Great News For Data Center Storage And HDD Capacity | TechCrunch

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If you’re at all familiar with mobile processors, you’ve likely heard a lot about 32nm vs. 28nm construction when comparing the current generation of chips from companies like Qualcomm and others. That refers to the size of the processor, where a smaller number is better in terms of power consumption, fitting more transistors in less space for more efficient processing.

Currently, it’s hard to get past around the 20nm when creating individual patterns for data storage on today’s disk drives, which is another area in addition to processors where Moore’s Law applies. Today though, HGST, a Western Digital Company, announced a breakthrough that allows it to produce patterns as small as 10nm, via a process called “nanolithography,” meaning that it can essentially double the current maximum storage capacity possible in hard disk drives, given the same-sized final product.

Nanolithography: Flexible patterning of the cellular microenvironment
Source: Small Times
The ability to place individual cells at defined  locations and control their microenvironment has numerous applications  in the field of cell biology.  Cells respond to their microenvironment and the resulting extracellular  signals [1, 2]. The ability to control the cellular microenvironment  enables investigation of biochemical and topological cues on various  cell behavior, such as cell adhesion, differentiation, and molecular  signaling pathways.
The nanolithography platform, NLP 2000, was designed to provide a simple solution to  achieve high precision placement of nano- to micro-sized features with  nanoscale precision. The process of deposition of material is based on  Dip Pen Nanolithography (DPN), an established method of nanofabrication  in which materials are deposited onto a surface using a sharp tip [9,  10]. The tool is capable of patterning a wide range of materials with  feature sizes from 50nm to 10µm over an area of 40 x 40mm. The features  can be placed with nanoscale precision using a three-axis closed-loop  stage.

Nanolithography: Flexible patterning of the cellular microenvironment

Source: Small Times

The ability to place individual cells at defined locations and control their microenvironment has numerous applications in the field of cell biology. Cells respond to their microenvironment and the resulting extracellular signals [1, 2]. The ability to control the cellular microenvironment enables investigation of biochemical and topological cues on various cell behavior, such as cell adhesion, differentiation, and molecular signaling pathways.

The nanolithography platform, NLP 2000, was designed to provide a simple solution to achieve high precision placement of nano- to micro-sized features with nanoscale precision. The process of deposition of material is based on Dip Pen Nanolithography (DPN), an established method of nanofabrication in which materials are deposited onto a surface using a sharp tip [9, 10]. The tool is capable of patterning a wide range of materials with feature sizes from 50nm to 10µm over an area of 40 x 40mm. The features can be placed with nanoscale precision using a three-axis closed-loop stage.