What is… Watson?
Just a year ago, a supercomputer called Watson changed forever how we imagine machine intelligence.
(via Sean Kelly Studio)

What is… Watson?

Just a year ago, a supercomputer called Watson changed forever how we imagine machine intelligence.

(via Sean Kelly Studio)

I have recently done a number of interviews on the implications of Apple’s voice assistant Siri. To me, it’s looking very much like Apple has once again brought a technology to market precisely when it is sufficiently mature to impress. Voice control and ‘intelligent assistants’ are far from new, but haven’t been widely used to date simply because they haven’t been good enough.

IBM Watson: The Science Behind an Answer (by IBM)   In this video, the four steps of Watson’s question answering technology are covered, along with what the future holds for IBM’s intelligent natural language processing platform beyond Jeopardy!

via horizonwatching:

Watson And The Future Of Marketing
Source: Mediapost
by Chuck Densinger and Mason Thelen
We all know that IBM’s Watson computer plays an awesome game of “Jeopardy.” But the technology behind Watson could soon help retailers increase both sales and customer satisfaction.   
By competing against humans at the highest levels, IBM’s Watson is something completely new — a computing system that can analyze human language and answer complex questions extremely fast. On “Jeopardy,” Watson correctly responded to the kind of complex clues that the show is famous for. An example, from a “Jeopardy” category called “Dialing for Dialects”:
Host Alex Trebek: While Maltese borrows many words from Italian, it developed from a dialect of this Semitic language.
Watson: What is Arabic? [Correct]
Watson represents a tremendous breakthrough in the ability of computers to understand natural language — which humans use to capture and communicate knowledge — as opposed to specially designed or encoded language just for computers. It can evaluate the equivalent of hundreds of millions of pages of material — books, reports, articles and so on — in three seconds or less. It is not stymied by intricate wordplay.
This kind of amazing question-answering capability could help retailers solve one of their most difficult customer service problems, which we call the perpetual stranger dilemma. Today, the typical large retailer has many thousands of loyal customers who regularly patronize the store, Web site, mobile application or catalog, spending lots of money. But still, they’re strangers. By this we mean the retailer doesn’t really know these customers or even have a basic understanding of their individual needs, tastes or what they might want to buy next.
Chuck Densinger helps lead the Advanced Customer Analytics practice in IBM’s Global Business 
Mason Thelen helps lead the Advanced Customer Analytics practice in IBM’s Global Business Services unit


Watson And The Future Of Marketing

Source: Mediapost

by Chuck Densinger and Mason Thelen

We all know that IBM’s Watson computer plays an awesome game of “Jeopardy.” But the technology behind Watson could soon help retailers increase both sales and customer satisfaction.  

By competing against humans at the highest levels, IBM’s Watson is something completely new — a computing system that can analyze human language and answer complex questions extremely fast. On “Jeopardy,” Watson correctly responded to the kind of complex clues that the show is famous for. An example, from a “Jeopardy” category called “Dialing for Dialects”:

Host Alex Trebek: While Maltese borrows many words from Italian, it developed from a dialect of this Semitic language.

Watson: What is Arabic? [Correct]

Watson represents a tremendous breakthrough in the ability of computers to understand natural language — which humans use to capture and communicate knowledge — as opposed to specially designed or encoded language just for computers. It can evaluate the equivalent of hundreds of millions of pages of material — books, reports, articles and so on — in three seconds or less. It is not stymied by intricate wordplay.

This kind of amazing question-answering capability could help retailers solve one of their most difficult customer service problems, which we call the perpetual stranger dilemma. Today, the typical large retailer has many thousands of loyal customers who regularly patronize the store, Web site, mobile application or catalog, spending lots of money. But still, they’re strangers. By this we mean the retailer doesn’t really know these customers or even have a basic understanding of their individual needs, tastes or what they might want to buy next.

Chuck Densinger helps lead the Advanced Customer Analytics practice in IBM’s Global Business 

Mason Thelen helps lead the Advanced Customer Analytics practice in IBM’s Global Business Services unit

(via ibmsocialbiz)

IBM Watson: Final Jeopardy! and the Future of Watson (via ibm)

After defeating the two greatest Jeopardy! champions of all time, the technology behind Watson will now be applied to some of the world’s most enticing challenges. Watch a breakdown of the match from Ken Jennings, Brad Rutter and the IBM team members as they look toward the future.

IBM Watson: The Face of Watson 

Preparing Watson for the Jeopardy! stage posed a unique challenge to the team: how to represent a system of 90 servers and hundreds of custom algorithms for the viewing public. IBM, in collaboration with a team of partners, created a representation of this computing system for the viewing audience — from its stage presence to its voice.

Engineering Intelligence: Why IBM’s Jeopardy-Playing Computer Is So Important
Source: Mashable

Language is arguably what makes us most human. Even the smartest and  chattiest of the animal kingdom have nothing on our lingual cognition.
In  computer science, the Holy Grail has long been to build software that  understands — and can interact with — natural human language. But dreams  of a real-life Johnny 5 or C-3PO have always been dashed on the great  gulf between raw processing power and the architecture of the human  mind. Computers are great at crunching large sets of numbers. The mind  excels at assumption and nuance.
Enter Watson,  an artificial intelligence project from IBM that’s over five years in  the making and about to prove itself to the world next week. The  supercomputer, named for the technology company’s founder, will be  competing with championship-level contestants on the quiz show Jeopardy!. The episodes will air on February 14, 15 and 16, and if recent practice rounds are any indication, Watson is in it to win it.
At first blush, building a computer with vast amounts of knowledge at its disposal seems mundane in our age. Google has already indexed a wide swath of the world’s codified information,  and can surface almost anything with a handful of keywords. The  difference is that Google doesn’t understand  a question like, “What  type of weapon is also the name of a Beatles record?”  It may yield some  information about The Beatles, or perhaps an article that mentions  weapons and The Beatles, but it’s not conceptualizing that the weapon  and recording in question have the same name: Revolver.
Achieving this is what makes Watson a contender on Jeopardy!,  a quiz known for nuance, puns, double entendres and complex language  designed to mislead human contestants. Google Search, or any common  semantic software, wouldn’t stand a chance against these lingual  acrobatics.

Engineering Intelligence: Why IBM’s Jeopardy-Playing Computer Is So Important

Source: Mashable

Language is arguably what makes us most human. Even the smartest and chattiest of the animal kingdom have nothing on our lingual cognition.

In computer science, the Holy Grail has long been to build software that understands — and can interact with — natural human language. But dreams of a real-life Johnny 5 or C-3PO have always been dashed on the great gulf between raw processing power and the architecture of the human mind. Computers are great at crunching large sets of numbers. The mind excels at assumption and nuance.

Enter Watson, an artificial intelligence project from IBM that’s over five years in the making and about to prove itself to the world next week. The supercomputer, named for the technology company’s founder, will be competing with championship-level contestants on the quiz show Jeopardy!. The episodes will air on February 14, 15 and 16, and if recent practice rounds are any indication, Watson is in it to win it.

At first blush, building a computer with vast amounts of knowledge at its disposal seems mundane in our age. Google has already indexed a wide swath of the world’s codified information, and can surface almost anything with a handful of keywords. The difference is that Google doesn’t understand a question like, “What type of weapon is also the name of a Beatles record?” It may yield some information about The Beatles, or perhaps an article that mentions weapons and The Beatles, but it’s not conceptualizing that the weapon and recording in question have the same name: Revolver.

Achieving this is what makes Watson a contender on Jeopardy!, a quiz known for nuance, puns, double entendres and complex language designed to mislead human contestants. Google Search, or any common semantic software, wouldn’t stand a chance against these lingual acrobatics.

YouTube - IBM and the Jeopardy Challenge

ibm.com/whatiswatson
Using advanced computing and emerging technology, IBM is building a natural language processing computer code-named Watson to compete in the game show Jeopardy.