Garmin HUD projects directions onto your windshield | The Car Tech blog
Smartphones have pretty much taken over as the default navigation tool for many drivers. However, some locales (including our home state of California) have outright banned smartphone use in the  car: no windshield mounts, no dashboard cradles. So, how are you going to get your turn-by-turn directions when looking at your phone is illegal? Today, Garmin announced a new way to interact with its StreetPilot and Navigon smartphone navigation apps: the HUD.
HUD — short for head-up display — sits on the dashboard at the base of the windshield, where it projects navigation data upwards into the driver’s line of sight, either onto a transparent film affixed to the windshield glass or a reflector lens that attaches to the HUD device. Both the film and reflector lens are included with the device.
Garmin states that HUD will automatically adjust the brightness of its projections, so that the display remains visible in direct sunlight or at night. The device will be powered by a 12V charging cable with an integrated USB port for keeping your smartphone charged as well.

Garmin HUD projects directions onto your windshield | The Car Tech blog

Smartphones have pretty much taken over as the default navigation tool for many drivers. However, some locales (including our home state of California) have outright banned smartphone use in the car: no windshield mounts, no dashboard cradles. So, how are you going to get your turn-by-turn directions when looking at your phone is illegal? Today, Garmin announced a new way to interact with its StreetPilot and Navigon smartphone navigation apps: the HUD.

HUD — short for head-up display — sits on the dashboard at the base of the windshield, where it projects navigation data upwards into the driver’s line of sight, either onto a transparent film affixed to the windshield glass or a reflector lens that attaches to the HUD device. Both the film and reflector lens are included with the device.

Garmin states that HUD will automatically adjust the brightness of its projections, so that the display remains visible in direct sunlight or at night. The device will be powered by a 12V charging cable with an integrated USB port for keeping your smartphone charged as well.

Pioneer shows off augmented reality device for cars
Pioneer, a Japanese maker of automotive navigation systems, was in attendance at the CEATEC 2012 event in Japan where it showcased its use of augmented reality in a heads up display for a car. The company has extensive experience in the realm of augmented reality and vehicles and believes that the technology could unlock a new generation of navigation devices for the auto industry. Automakers too have shown interest in augmented reality, adding momentum to Pioneer’s efforts.

Pioneer shows off augmented reality device for cars

Pioneer, a Japanese maker of automotive navigation systems, was in attendance at the CEATEC 2012 event in Japan where it showcased its use of augmented reality in a heads up display for a car. The company has extensive experience in the realm of augmented reality and vehicles and believes that the technology could unlock a new generation of navigation devices for the auto industry. Automakers too have shown interest in augmented reality, adding momentum to Pioneer’s efforts.

Google  LatLong: Google Maps can now send destinations directly to more than 20  car brands worldwide
When we started the “Send-To-Car” service on Google Maps more than three years ago with BMW, only a few car makers offered connected services to their drivers. The industry has come a long way since then. Several car manufacturers have made industry-changing commitments to bringing connectivity to the majority, if not the entirety of their car line. We see more and more cars with connected navigation and entertainment systems leaving the assembly line and the trend is here to stay. That’s fantastic news for both drivers and the automotive industry.

Google LatLong: Google Maps can now send destinations directly to more than 20 car brands worldwide

When we started the “Send-To-Car” service on Google Maps more than three years ago with BMW, only a few car makers offered connected services to their drivers. The industry has come a long way since then. Several car manufacturers have made industry-changing commitments to bringing connectivity to the majority, if not the entirety of their car line. We see more and more cars with connected navigation and entertainment systems leaving the assembly line and the trend is here to stay. That’s fantastic news for both drivers and the automotive industry.

A New Meaning for “Drive By Wire”

Virtual Cable™ is a unique display for a car navigation system. The driver sees the Virtual Cable™ image through the windshield. It appears as if suspended over the road, similar to a trolley cable. The image is in true 3D and appears to be a natural part of the landscape. The driver uses only peripheral vision to follow the Virtual Cable™.