smartercities:

World’s first hybrid wind/current generator could generate double the power | Treehugger
Combining a three-bladed Darrieus turbine on top, a Savonius turbine underneath, and a generator in between, the SKWID power generation concept is claimed to be the world’s first hybrid system “capable of maximizing the harvesting of ocean energy from wind and current”.

smartercities:

World’s first hybrid wind/current generator could generate double the power | Treehugger

Combining a three-bladed Darrieus turbine on top, a Savonius turbine underneath, and a generator in between, the SKWID power generation concept is claimed to be the world’s first hybrid system “capable of maximizing the harvesting of ocean energy from wind and current”.

Tidal power is now a legit source of renewable energy | Grist
Tidal power, produced from the force of our planet’s oceans sloshing to  and fro, has always seemed like a neat idea. But the challenges of  making it work — imagine giant underwater propellers having to  withstand strong currents and the unending assault of the sea — made it  seem less than realistic.
But now manufacturing giant Siemens is throwing its weight behind tidal power startup Marine Current Turbines,  which has had a 1.2 megawatt demonstration turbine operating beneath  the waves of Northern Ireland’s Strangford Lough since 2008.
Siemens’ interest is simple: Tidal power is super predictable. (Predictable as the tides, even.)

Tidal power is now a legit source of renewable energy | Grist

Tidal power, produced from the force of our planet’s oceans sloshing to and fro, has always seemed like a neat idea. But the challenges of making it work — imagine giant underwater propellers having to withstand strong currents and the unending assault of the sea — made it seem less than realistic.

But now manufacturing giant Siemens is throwing its weight behind tidal power startup Marine Current Turbines, which has had a 1.2 megawatt demonstration turbine operating beneath the waves of Northern Ireland’s Strangford Lough since 2008.

Siemens’ interest is simple: Tidal power is super predictable. (Predictable as the tides, even.)

electricpower:

Key to ocean-wave power: keep your generators dry (i.e. on land) 

Pulling almost unlimited energy from the ocean’s waves, tides, and currents isn’t a new quest. But Aquamarine Power’s Oyster takes a simple approach that may just find that holy grail.
So far, harnessing ocean power has been tough, due the sea’s brutal, machine-crushing operating environment. (Turns out Neptune’s an angry, vengeful god.) But Aquamarine has a solution:

The key is the Oyster’s simplicity. It’s basically a giant hinged flap pushed by wave energy, with just seven pieces — two hydraulic pumps, four valves and a hinge — that send pressurized water ashore. Once there, this water drives a turbine, making the Oyster’s power-generating guts more like a typical hydroelectric power plant than any ocean-energy idea tested to date.
Moving pressurized water ashore, and not electricity itself, keeps the transmission equipment — the generator, converters, transformers and other equipment that doesn’t mix well with water — high and dry on land.
The firm hopes to shuck enough Oysters to generate 200 megawatts, in a proposed ocean energy farm off Scotland’s Orkney Islands, by 2013.
Via Aquamarine Power

DVICE

electricpower:

Key to ocean-wave power: keep your generators dry (i.e. on land)

Pulling almost unlimited energy from the ocean’s waves, tides, and currents isn’t a new quest. But Aquamarine Power’s Oyster takes a simple approach that may just find that holy grail.

So far, harnessing ocean power has been tough, due the sea’s brutal, machine-crushing operating environment. (Turns out Neptune’s an angry, vengeful god.) But Aquamarine has a solution:

The key is the Oyster’s simplicity. It’s basically a giant hinged flap pushed by wave energy, with just seven pieces — two hydraulic pumps, four valves and a hinge — that send pressurized water ashore. Once there, this water drives a turbine, making the Oyster’s power-generating guts more like a typical hydroelectric power plant than any ocean-energy idea tested to date.

Moving pressurized water ashore, and not electricity itself, keeps the transmission equipment — the generator, converters, transformers and other equipment that doesn’t mix well with water — high and dry on land.

The firm hopes to shuck enough Oysters to generate 200 megawatts, in a proposed ocean energy farm off Scotland’s Orkney Islands, by 2013.

Via Aquamarine Power

DVICE

The map below shows the locations of Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System (PORTS) stations in the New York - New Jersey Harbor Area. These stations contribute a variety of real-time information via the web and the PORTS INFOHUB network. Just click on the datatype you are interested in for the whole harbor (Ports Real Time Data) or click on an individual station to see local data. Data reported in real time are colored yellow on the map. (via NYNJharbor)

The map below shows the locations of Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System (PORTS) stations in the New York - New Jersey Harbor Area. These stations contribute a variety of real-time information via the web and the PORTS INFOHUB network. Just click on the datatype you are interested in for the whole harbor (Ports Real Time Data) or click on an individual station to see local data. Data reported in real time are colored yellow on the map. (via NYNJharbor)