It used to all make sense. The web was once nothing but documents. Just like you’d want some type of file browser UI to dig through files on your operating system, obviously, you need some type of document browser to view all these web-addressable “documents”. But over time, those “documents” have become a lot more. A. lot. more. But I can now use one of these “documents” to have a 4 person video/audio conference on Talky with people anywhere in the world, play incredible full-screen first-person shooters at 60fps, write code in a full-fledged editor, or {{ the reader may insert any number of amazing web apps here }} using nothing but this “document viewer”. Does calling them “documents” seem ridiculous to anyone else? Of course it does. Calling them “sites” is pretty silly too, actually because a “site” implies a document with links and a URL.

What My 11 Year Old’s Stanford Course Taught Me About Online Education - Forbes
My 11 year old son just took a course at Stanford. That has a nice ring to it but it is actually meaningless because these days anyone can take a course at Stanford. You don’t even have to pay. All you need is access to a computer and a reasonable Internet connection. So what we can say is my 11 year old son just watched a bunch of videos on the Internet.
That doesn’t make for an interesting post except that this ‘bunch of videos’ is currently being heralded as the future of higher education. In the New York Times, David Brooks saw courses like the one my son took as a tsunami about to hit campuses all over the world. And he isn’t alone. Harvard’s Clay Christensen sees it asa transformative technology that will change education forever. And along with Stanford many other institutions, most notably Harvard and MIT, are leaping into the online mix. This is attracting attention and investment dollars. It has people nervous and excited. So I wondered, what happens when someone who has grown up online encountered one of these new ventures?
The course my son just completed was ‘Game Theory’ taught by Matthew Jackson and Yoav Shoham.

What My 11 Year Old’s Stanford Course Taught Me About Online Education - Forbes

My 11 year old son just took a course at Stanford. That has a nice ring to it but it is actually meaningless because these days anyone can take a course at Stanford. You don’t even have to pay. All you need is access to a computer and a reasonable Internet connection. So what we can say is my 11 year old son just watched a bunch of videos on the Internet.

That doesn’t make for an interesting post except that this ‘bunch of videos’ is currently being heralded as the future of higher education. In the New York TimesDavid Brooks saw courses like the one my son took as a tsunami about to hit campuses all over the world. And he isn’t alone. Harvard’s Clay Christensen sees it asa transformative technology that will change education forever. And along with Stanford many other institutions, most notably Harvard and MIT, are leaping into the online mix. This is attracting attention and investment dollars. It has people nervous and excited. So I wondered, what happens when someone who has grown up online encountered one of these new ventures?

The course my son just completed was ‘Game Theory’ taught by Matthew Jackson and Yoav Shoham.

The Faculty Project
The best Professors from the world’s leading Universities are coming together to teach online FOR FREE!
The Faculty Project brings academia’s most outstanding professors to the computers, tablets and smartphones of people all over the world.
All courses will be free with open enrollment for anyone with an Internet connection.

The Faculty Project

The best Professors from the world’s leading Universities are coming together to teach online FOR FREE!

The Faculty Project brings academia’s most outstanding professors to the computers, tablets and smartphones of people all over the world.

All courses will be free with open enrollment for anyone with an Internet connection.

Stanford Professors Launch Online University Coursera - Liz Gannes - News - AllThingsD
There seems to be something in the water at Stanford University that’s making faculty members leave their more-than-perfectly-good jobs and go teach online.
Stanford computer science professors Daphne Koller and Andrew Ng are on leave to launchCoursera, which will offer university classes for free online, in partnership with top schools.
Mountain View, Calif.-based Coursera is backed with $16 million in funding led by John Doerr at Kleiner Perkins and Scott Sandell at NEA. It has no immediate plans to charge for courses or to make money in other ways.
Compared to Udacity, a similar start-up from former Stanford professor Sebastian Thrunthat’s creating its own classes, Coursera helps support its university partners in creating their own courses, which are listed under each school’s brand.
Some might doubt that universities would want to share their prized content for free online with a start-up, but Coursera has already signed up Princeton, Stanford, the University of Michigan and the University of Pennsylvania as partners, with a set of classes launching April 23.

Stanford Professors Launch Online University Coursera - Liz Gannes - News - AllThingsD

There seems to be something in the water at Stanford University that’s making faculty members leave their more-than-perfectly-good jobs and go teach online.

Stanford computer science professors Daphne Koller and Andrew Ng are on leave to launchCoursera, which will offer university classes for free online, in partnership with top schools.

Mountain View, Calif.-based Coursera is backed with $16 million in funding led by John Doerr at Kleiner Perkins and Scott Sandell at NEA. It has no immediate plans to charge for courses or to make money in other ways.

Compared to Udacitya similar start-up from former Stanford professor Sebastian Thrunthat’s creating its own classes, Coursera helps support its university partners in creating their own courses, which are listed under each school’s brand.

Some might doubt that universities would want to share their prized content for free online with a start-up, but Coursera has already signed up Princeton, Stanford, the University of Michigan and the University of Pennsylvania as partners, with a set of classes launching April 23.

A new capability in the IBM SmartCloud for Social Business is a cloud-based office productivity suite, IBM Docs. Now in beta and planned for availability in 2012, IBM Docs is a social document platform that allows organizations, both inside and outside the firewall, to simultaneously collaborate on word processing, spreadsheet and presentation documents in the cloud

Computer Science 101 | Free Online Stanford Course
Nick Parlante has been teaching Computer Science at Stanford for over 20 years, and teaches programming best practices at Google. Nick has also produced the Google Python Class and codingbat.com code practice site, and the infamous Binky Pointer Fun video. (Nick’s Home)
About the Course
CS101 teaches the essential ideas of Computer Science for a zero-prior-experience audience. Computers can appear very complicated, but in reality, computers work within just a few, simple patterns. CS101 demystifies and brings those patterns to life, which is useful for anyone using computers today.
In CS101, students play and experiment with short bits of “computer code” to bring to life to the power and limitations of computers. Everything works within the browser, so there is no extra software to download or install. CS101 also provides a general background on computers today: what is a computer, what is hardware, what is software, what is the internet. No previous experience is required other than the ability to use a web browser.
Here is another video Nick created for this class.

Computer Science 101 | Free Online Stanford Course

Nick Parlante has been teaching Computer Science at Stanford for over 20 years, and teaches programming best practices at Google. Nick has also produced the Google Python Class and codingbat.com code practice site, and the infamous Binky Pointer Fun video. (Nick’s Home)

About the Course

CS101 teaches the essential ideas of Computer Science for a zero-prior-experience audience. Computers can appear very complicated, but in reality, computers work within just a few, simple patterns. CS101 demystifies and brings those patterns to life, which is useful for anyone using computers today.

In CS101, students play and experiment with short bits of “computer code” to bring to life to the power and limitations of computers. Everything works within the browser, so there is no extra software to download or install. CS101 also provides a general background on computers today: what is a computer, what is hardware, what is software, what is the internet. No previous experience is required other than the ability to use a web browser.

Here is another video Nick created for this class.

Clayton Christensen on disruption in online education | The Next Web
Earlier this year we discussed how the Internet is revolutionizing education and  featured several companies and organizations that are disrupting the  online education space including Open Yale, Open Culture, Khan  Academy, Academic Earth, P2PU, Skillshare, Scitable and Skype in the  Classroom. The Internet has changed how we interact with Time. We can be  learning all the time now, whenever we want, and wherever we want. And  because of that, we’re seeing explosive growth in online education.
In October, Knewton, an education technology startup, raised $33 million in its 4th round of funding to roll out its adaptive online learning platform. In early November, Khan Academy,  an online collection featuring over 2,100 educational videos ranging in  intensity from 1+1=2 to college level calculus and physics, snagged $5 million in funding to add two new faculty members that will create lectures for humanities and art-intensive classes.
According to the 2010 Sloan Survey of Online Learning,  approximately 5.6 million students took at least one web-based class  during the fall 2009 semester, which marked a 21% growth from the  previous year. The Harvard Business School Review points out that this figure is up from 45,000 in 2000 and experts predict that online education could reach 14 million in 2014.

Clayton Christensen on disruption in online education | The Next Web

Earlier this year we discussed how the Internet is revolutionizing education and featured several companies and organizations that are disrupting the online education space including Open Yale, Open Culture, Khan Academy, Academic Earth, P2PU, Skillshare, Scitable and Skype in the Classroom. The Internet has changed how we interact with Time. We can be learning all the time now, whenever we want, and wherever we want. And because of that, we’re seeing explosive growth in online education.

In October, Knewton, an education technology startup, raised $33 million in its 4th round of funding to roll out its adaptive online learning platform. In early November, Khan Academy, an online collection featuring over 2,100 educational videos ranging in intensity from 1+1=2 to college level calculus and physics, snagged $5 million in funding to add two new faculty members that will create lectures for humanities and art-intensive classes.

According to the 2010 Sloan Survey of Online Learning, approximately 5.6 million students took at least one web-based class during the fall 2009 semester, which marked a 21% growth from the previous year. The Harvard Business School Review points out that this figure is up from 45,000 in 2000 and experts predict that online education could reach 14 million in 2014.

Skype In The Classroom: An International Social Network For Teachers
Skype realizes  full well its software is used by many school teachers and students from  around the globe, and today announced that it has built a dedicated  social network to help them connect, collaborate and exchange knowledge  and teaching resources over the Web.
This morning, the company launched a free international community site dubbed Skype in the Classroom, an online platform designed to help teachers find each other and relevant projects according to search criteria such as the age groups they teach, location and subjects of interest.
The platform, which has been in beta since the end of December,  already has a community of more than 4,000 teachers, across 99  countries.
Teachers need only sign up with their Skype account at the website,  create a profile with their interests, location and the age groups they  teach and start connecting with other teachers by exploring the  directory, where they can also find projects and resources that match  their skills, needs or interests.
A members-only community, Skype in the Classroom lets teachers easily  add each other to their Skype contact lists or message one another.

Skype In The Classroom: An International Social Network For Teachers

Skype realizes full well its software is used by many school teachers and students from around the globe, and today announced that it has built a dedicated social network to help them connect, collaborate and exchange knowledge and teaching resources over the Web.

This morning, the company launched a free international community site dubbed Skype in the Classroom, an online platform designed to help teachers find each other and relevant projects according to search criteria such as the age groups they teach, location and subjects of interest.

The platform, which has been in beta since the end of December, already has a community of more than 4,000 teachers, across 99 countries.

Teachers need only sign up with their Skype account at the website, create a profile with their interests, location and the age groups they teach and start connecting with other teachers by exploring the directory, where they can also find projects and resources that match their skills, needs or interests.

A members-only community, Skype in the Classroom lets teachers easily add each other to their Skype contact lists or message one another.