Smarter Planet -- How Social is Transforming Patient Care -- A Smarter Planet Blog

Paul Papas, Global Leader, IBM Global Business Services

Paul Papas, Global Leader, IBM Global Business Services

By Paul Papas

Earlier this week, IBM and Boston Children’s Hospital offered a glimpse into the transformative potential of social networking technologies with the unveiling of OPENPediatrics, the world’s first social learning platform designed to connect clinicians from around the world to share knowledge and best practices in the care of critically ill children – all supported on the cloud.

It was a single phone call to Dr. Jeffrey Burns that became the genesis for OPENPediatrics.  After helping a pediatrician in Guatemala successfully treat a young girl with a life-threatening blood disorder, all by using a video link, he aspired to bring world-class critical care to other pediatricians and their patients in every corner of the world.

Boston Children’s Hospital and IBM Introduce OPENPediatrics (by IBM)

Boston Children’s Hospital and IBM introduce an all new social learning platform, OPENPediatrics, to enable clinicians to improve treatment and outcomes for critically ill children around the world.

smartercities:

Open Data’s Road to Better Transit | Government Technology
Data is everywhere. It now costs less to capture, store and process data than ever before, thanks to better technology and economies of scale. And more than ever, the public expects government to use data to improve its services. Increasingly, government’s problem is not capturing the data, but having sufficient resources to clean and analyze the information in order to address issues, improve performance and make informed decisions.

smartercities:

Open Data’s Road to Better Transit | Government Technology

Data is everywhere. It now costs less to capture, store and process data than ever before, thanks to better technology and economies of scale. And more than ever, the public expects government to use data to improve its services. Increasingly, government’s problem is not capturing the data, but having sufficient resources to clean and analyze the information in order to address issues, improve performance and make informed decisions.

The combination of Obamacare regulations, incentives in the recovery act for doctors and hospitals to shift to electronic records and the releasing of mountains of data held by the Department of Health and Human Services is creating a new marketplace and platform for innovation — a health care Silicon Valley — that has the potential to create better outcomes at lower costs by changing how health data are stored, shared and mined. It’s a new industry.

Bringing Hidden Healthcare Data Into the Open | Wired Business | Wired.com
As anyone who has had the courage to research a sore throat or mystery rash online knows, there is an overabundance of information available to help you try and get a handle on what ails you. What has been missing, however, is easy access to other kinds of medical information that have a direct bearing on healthcare, including a patient’s own medical records, test results, copies of X-rays and MRIs, and how one doctor performs when compared to others in his or her area of expertise. Enter self-described health IT hacktivist and author Fred Trotter, who, with a bit of crowdfunding cash, and a whole lot of patience, has hatched a plan to bring hidden healthcare data into the open.

Bringing Hidden Healthcare Data Into the Open | Wired Business | Wired.com

As anyone who has had the courage to research a sore throat or mystery rash online knows, there is an overabundance of information available to help you try and get a handle on what ails you. What has been missing, however, is easy access to other kinds of medical information that have a direct bearing on healthcare, including a patient’s own medical records, test results, copies of X-rays and MRIs, and how one doctor performs when compared to others in his or her area of expertise. Enter self-described health IT hacktivist and author Fred Trotter, who, with a bit of crowdfunding cash, and a whole lot of patience, has hatched a plan to bring hidden healthcare data into the open.

WWW inventor: HTML5 will make Minority Report look like child’s play | Silicon Republic

Open data heralds the internet’s next exciting phase

Considered one of the pioneering fathers of the internet, Berners-Lee believes we are only at the dawn of an even more exciting era - the era of open data and the semantic web, where almost every feasible physical device or piece of data will be interlinked online.

“The semantic web vision has taken a long time to come to fruition because the web is so exciting in many other ways,” says Berners-Lee, who has been driving new metadata labelling formats to make everything linkable.

WWW inventor: HTML5 will make Minority Report look like childs play

This brings us on to the next big revolution - open data - and he says governments and businesses are at the forefront of opening up datasets for individuals, citizens and other businesses to make more informed decisions.The future web we are about to see will be one in which data and devices everywhere will be interlinked and metadata is central to this - effectively who owns A or B in the same way individuals own the deeds to their homes but the difference is allowing this data to be usable and open.

He cites the corner boxes you see on Wikipedia, for example, as a case of how databases and datasets can be globally linked.

(read more on Silicon Republic)

30 Open Data Resources - semanticweb.com
Romy Misra has posted a list of thirty places to find open data on the web …
Misra starts the list with a few government and political data resources: “Data.gov: This is the  go-to resource for government-related data. It claims to have up to 400,000 data sets, both raw data and geo spatial, in a variety of formats. The only caveat in using the data sets is you have to make sure you clean them, since many have missing values and characters. Socrata is another good place to explore government-related data. One great thing about Socrata is they have some visualization tools that make exploring the data easier.”
Find the rest of the list here.
Image: Courtesy Flickr/ schoschie

30 Open Data Resources - semanticweb.com

Romy Misra has posted a list of thirty places to find open data on the web …

Misra starts the list with a few government and political data resources: “Data.gov: This is the  go-to resource for government-related data. It claims to have up to 400,000 data sets, both raw data and geo spatial, in a variety of formats. The only caveat in using the data sets is you have to make sure you clean them, since many have missing values and characters. Socrata is another good place to explore government-related data. One great thing about Socrata is they have some visualization tools that make exploring the data easier.”

Find the rest of the list here.

Image: Courtesy Flickr/ schoschie


opensandiego:

We make data about San Diego freely available for anyone to use.
Starting Open San Diego has been a lot of fun. It’s exciting to see how quickly our community has grown!
The most difficult, and important, work to do in these early days is make ourselves an official non-profit, select a board, and start raising money. It takes time to do it right
…
Discussions about “open government” and “government 2.0” get extremely confusing extremely quickly. There are countless ways to apply openness and new technology to improve our government, which often ends up leading to countless overlapping conversations. We have to fight hard against this tendency. This is one of the reasons why we focus exclusively on making data more accessible.
Our visual identity is part of this too. Our sites should be clean and easy to understand. We’re tackling complicated problems, and we don’t want to further complicate them with confusing and cluttered design. We also want to avoid alienating less web-savvy or technical audiences who have valuable insights and contributions to make.

opensandiego:

We make data about San Diego freely available for anyone to use.

Starting Open San Diego has been a lot of fun. It’s exciting to see how quickly our community has grown!

The most difficult, and important, work to do in these early days is make ourselves an official non-profit, select a board, and start raising money. It takes time to do it right

Discussions about “open government” and “government 2.0” get extremely confusing extremely quickly. There are countless ways to apply openness and new technology to improve our government, which often ends up leading to countless overlapping conversations. We have to fight hard against this tendency. This is one of the reasons why we focus exclusively on making data more accessible.

Our visual identity is part of this too. Our sites should be clean and easy to understand. We’re tackling complicated problems, and we don’t want to further complicate them with confusing and cluttered design. We also want to avoid alienating less web-savvy or technical audiences who have valuable insights and contributions to make.