opensandiego:

We make data about San Diego freely available for anyone to use.
Starting Open San Diego has been a lot of fun. It’s exciting to see how quickly our community has grown!
The most difficult, and important, work to do in these early days is make ourselves an official non-profit, select a board, and start raising money. It takes time to do it right
…
Discussions about “open government” and “government 2.0” get extremely confusing extremely quickly. There are countless ways to apply openness and new technology to improve our government, which often ends up leading to countless overlapping conversations. We have to fight hard against this tendency. This is one of the reasons why we focus exclusively on making data more accessible.
Our visual identity is part of this too. Our sites should be clean and easy to understand. We’re tackling complicated problems, and we don’t want to further complicate them with confusing and cluttered design. We also want to avoid alienating less web-savvy or technical audiences who have valuable insights and contributions to make.

opensandiego:

We make data about San Diego freely available for anyone to use.

Starting Open San Diego has been a lot of fun. It’s exciting to see how quickly our community has grown!

The most difficult, and important, work to do in these early days is make ourselves an official non-profit, select a board, and start raising money. It takes time to do it right

Discussions about “open government” and “government 2.0” get extremely confusing extremely quickly. There are countless ways to apply openness and new technology to improve our government, which often ends up leading to countless overlapping conversations. We have to fight hard against this tendency. This is one of the reasons why we focus exclusively on making data more accessible.

Our visual identity is part of this too. Our sites should be clean and easy to understand. We’re tackling complicated problems, and we don’t want to further complicate them with confusing and cluttered design. We also want to avoid alienating less web-savvy or technical audiences who have valuable insights and contributions to make.

We’re in open government’s beta period

As Congress returns to Washington after this weekend’s somber anniversary, the conversation on Capitol will inevitably shift to the midterm elections. The White House is faced with high unemployment, the long war abroad and domestic priorities that range from education to energy policy to immigration to cybersecurity.

In that context, it might be easy for citizens and officials alike to let deep discussion of open government be subsumed under the tsunami of partisan rancor, entertainment news and horse race coverage of the elections. That would be a mistake. There are legitimate arguments to be had about the tech policy choices of Congress and the White House, and they will no doubt be on display in the pages of the country’s newspapers and hotly debated in comment threads.

What’s not in contention, however, is the exploration of technology-enabled platforms for a government of, by, for and with the people. This deserves close scrutiny.