One Year Later and IBM's Social Business is Still Superior to Apple's - Forbes

imageIn an article I wrote last year titled “Why Every Company Needs to be More Like IBM and Less Like Apple”, I compared the cultures of both companies and how over the past 25 years they had flipped: “Today’s Big Blue is the antithesis of Big Brother. It’s ‘Big Open’. A transparent, nimble, collaborative organization known more for listening and engaging customers than for dictating to them. While ironically, some say Apple now resembles Big Brother given their propensity for tight controls.”

That article and the number of follow on pieces written to support and rebuke my argument stirred up a heated debate that continues to this day. So how have the two companies fared in the past year?

IBM’s stock price is up 7% and Apple’s is up about 2.5% year over year. Not a significant difference, but as we’ve seen in the past few weeks, Apple looks to be losing momentum while IBM’s is building.

Free, Open-Source Digital Textbook Provider, Boundless, Releases Its Content Under Creative Commons | TechCrunch
Since first emerging early last year, Boston-based startup Boundless has been on a mission to give students a free alternative to the financial and physical costs of bulky backpacks brimming with pricey hard-copy textbooks. Co-founders Ariel Diaz, Brian Balfour and Aaron White believe that the incumbents, the old-school textbook publishers (the top four of which still control the market) have been driving up the cost of educational content for years, so Boundless has been fighting the Powers That Be by offering a free, digital alternative culled from existing, open educational resources.

Free, Open-Source Digital Textbook Provider, Boundless, Releases Its Content Under Creative Commons | TechCrunch

Since first emerging early last year, Boston-based startup Boundless has been on a mission to give students a free alternative to the financial and physical costs of bulky backpacks brimming with pricey hard-copy textbooks. Co-founders Ariel Diaz, Brian Balfour and Aaron White believe that the incumbents, the old-school textbook publishers (the top four of which still control the market) have been driving up the cost of educational content for years, so Boundless has been fighting the Powers That Be by offering a free, digital alternative culled from existing, open educational resources.

Crowdfunding push for EZ-EV open source electric kit car
Electrical engineer Gary Krysztopik has been driving his self-built, open-framed, three-wheeled electric “hotrod” on the roads and highways of San Antonio (TX) for over three years now, but folks still can’t help staring as he zooms past. While also working on gas-to-electric conversions (including a VW Bug and a Porsche Carrera), he’s been busy refining and tweaking the design for his “battery box on wheels” and is now preparing to release the EZ-EV car as open source plans, build-it-yourself kits and complete vehicles.

Crowdfunding push for EZ-EV open source electric kit car

Electrical engineer Gary Krysztopik has been driving his self-built, open-framed, three-wheeled electric “hotrod” on the roads and highways of San Antonio (TX) for over three years now, but folks still can’t help staring as he zooms past. While also working on gas-to-electric conversions (including a VW Bug and a Porsche Carrera), he’s been busy refining and tweaking the design for his “battery box on wheels” and is now preparing to release the EZ-EV car as open source plans, build-it-yourself kits and complete vehicles.

Arduino-powered plant can water itself, thank you very much | Digital Trends
Make a trip to the nearest Radioshack and build yourself an automated self-watering plant so you no longer have to remember to do the task.

My personal rule for my apartment is: Don’t bring any living thing in except humans unless you want it to die. I just don’t have time to keep up with the care taking of plants and animals! So if you’re like me but still want a piece of nature in your home, perhaps you can build yourself this Arduino-powered self-watering plant, set it, and forget it.
Available via Instructables by Randy Sarafan, the self-watering plant tutorial requires you to have some basic mechanical skills to build an electronic pump which will feed your plant in your honor. There are several steps of wire attachment and fastening bits and pieces inside one power box, but each move is intuitive and pretty simple.
Read more: http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/arduino-powered-plant-can-water-itself/#ixzz227Iwum7a

Arduino-powered plant can water itself, thank you very much | Digital Trends

Make a trip to the nearest Radioshack and build yourself an automated self-watering plant so you no longer have to remember to do the task.

My personal rule for my apartment is: Don’t bring any living thing in except humans unless you want it to die. I just don’t have time to keep up with the care taking of plants and animals! So if you’re like me but still want a piece of nature in your home, perhaps you can build yourself this Arduino-powered self-watering plant, set it, and forget it.

Available via Instructables by Randy Sarafan, the self-watering plant tutorial requires you to have some basic mechanical skills to build an electronic pump which will feed your plant in your honor. There are several steps of wire attachment and fastening bits and pieces inside one power box, but each move is intuitive and pretty simple.



Read more: http://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/arduino-powered-plant-can-water-itself/#ixzz227Iwum7a

ibmsocialbiz:

Linux played a crucial role in discovery of ‘Higgs boson’ A physicist from CERN throws open-source Linux “some love” for its role in collaborative high performance computing used in discovery of the particle fundamental to the creation of mass in the universe. Via  Ubuntu Vibes 

ibmsocialbiz:

Linux played a crucial role in discovery of ‘Higgs boson’ A physicist from CERN throws open-source Linux “some love” for its role in collaborative high performance computing used in discovery of the particle fundamental to the creation of mass in the universe. Via  Ubuntu Vibes 

The Raspberry Pi computer goes on general sale | BBC

A credit-card sized computer designed to help teach children to code has gone on sale for the first time.

The Raspberry Pi is a bare-bones, low-cost computer created by volunteers mostly drawn from academia and the UK tech industry.

Sold uncased without keyboard or monitor, the Pi has drawn interest from educators and enthusiasts.

Supporters hope the machines could help reverse a lack of programming skills in the UK.

"It has been six years in the making; the number of things that had to go right for this to happen is enormous. I couldn’t be more pleased," said Eben Upton of the Raspberry Pi Foundation which is based in Cambridge.

Massive demand for the computer has caused the website of one supplier, Leeds-based Premier Farnell, to crash under the weight of heavy traffic.

New Hope For Open Source Textbooks | TechCrunch
Free digital open source textbooks are a promising alternative for states looking to cut costs and for universities trying to spare students from the soaring price of higher education. A growing number of laptop computers and tablets in the classroom provide an even greater opportunity to switch.  Indeed, the fledgling open source textbook movement is getting extra attention these days. Experiments are underway in a number of states and districts.
Last month, Utah’s State Office of Education said it would start a program to make open source textbooks available to students in kindergarten through 12th grade. Washington State’s legislature is considering a similar program.  The idea of open source textbooks is not new. They have been around for more than a decade, a period in which the major commercial publishers hiked textbook prices faster than inflation.  Until recently, however, open source textbooks gained little traction, in part, because of the byzantine process for approving school books. State and local school boards, which insure that books meet standards, are not known for innovative thinking.

New Hope For Open Source Textbooks | TechCrunch

Free digital open source textbooks are a promising alternative for states looking to cut costs and for universities trying to spare students from the soaring price of higher education. A growing number of laptop computers and tablets in the classroom provide an even greater opportunity to switch. Indeed, the fledgling open source textbook movement is getting extra attention these days. Experiments are underway in a number of states and districts.

Last month, Utah’s State Office of Education said it would start a program to make open source textbooks available to students in kindergarten through 12th grade. Washington State’s legislature is considering a similar program. The idea of open source textbooks is not new. They have been around for more than a decade, a period in which the major commercial publishers hiked textbook prices faster than inflation. Until recently, however, open source textbooks gained little traction, in part, because of the byzantine process for approving school books. State and local school boards, which insure that books meet standards, are not known for innovative thinking.

Open source ‘blocks’ connect the offline world with the web

Hard on the heels of our recent story about EVRYTHNG comes word of yet another venture that brings us one step closer towards an Internet of Things. The spotting this time? Ninja Blocks, an open source hardware project based in San Francisco that aims to provide “a two-way bridge between the things in your life and the web services you use every day.” READ MORE…
via springwise:

Open source ‘blocks’ connect the offline world with the web

Hard on the heels of our recent story about EVRYTHNG comes word of yet another venture that brings us one step closer towards an Internet of Things. The spotting this time? Ninja Blocks, an open source hardware project based in San Francisco that aims to provide “a two-way bridge between the things in your life and the web services you use every day.” READ MORE…

via springwise:

Sebastian Thrun Aims to Revolutionize University Education With Udacity | Singularity Hub
This past August fellow Singularity Hub writer Aaron Saenz wrote about Udacity, the online university created by Stanford artificial intelligence professor and Google autonomous vehicle leader, Sebastian Thrun. At the time Thrun was gearing up to teach his  Introduction to Artificial Intelligence course to a class of 200 at  Stanford. But why teach 200 when you can teach 1,000…or 160,000? With  Udacity, Thrun and fellow AI giant Peter Norvig created an online version of the course, and anyone that wanted to  enroll could – for free. The homework assignments and exams would be the  same as the ones given to the Stanford students, and they would be  graded in the same way so online enrollees could see how they stacked up  to some of the brightest students in the world. It was to be a grand  experiment in education.
Now, the semester’s over. The exams have been taken, the homework’s  been turned in, computers logged off and pencils set down. How’d it all  turn out? Thrun spoke recently at the Digital Life Design conference about he and Norvig’s experience. As you’ll see, his students weren’t the only ones with much to learn.
Online, the course went viral. Over 100,000 people enrolled in the  initial weeks. By the time the lessons began Thrun and Norvig were  instructors for a class size of 160,000. With students all over the  world, they enlisted the help of some 2,000 volunteer translators to  translate the classes into 44 different languages. Discussion groups  were set up on social networks like Facebook so students could help each  other, forming what Thrun called an “entire counterculture.”

Sebastian Thrun Aims to Revolutionize University Education With Udacity | Singularity Hub

This past August fellow Singularity Hub writer Aaron Saenz wrote about Udacity, the online university created by Stanford artificial intelligence professor and Google autonomous vehicle leader, Sebastian Thrun. At the time Thrun was gearing up to teach his Introduction to Artificial Intelligence course to a class of 200 at Stanford. But why teach 200 when you can teach 1,000…or 160,000? With Udacity, Thrun and fellow AI giant Peter Norvig created an online version of the course, and anyone that wanted to enroll could – for free. The homework assignments and exams would be the same as the ones given to the Stanford students, and they would be graded in the same way so online enrollees could see how they stacked up to some of the brightest students in the world. It was to be a grand experiment in education.

Now, the semester’s over. The exams have been taken, the homework’s been turned in, computers logged off and pencils set down. How’d it all turn out? Thrun spoke recently at the Digital Life Design conference about he and Norvig’s experience. As you’ll see, his students weren’t the only ones with much to learn.

Online, the course went viral. Over 100,000 people enrolled in the initial weeks. By the time the lessons began Thrun and Norvig were instructors for a class size of 160,000. With students all over the world, they enlisted the help of some 2,000 volunteer translators to translate the classes into 44 different languages. Discussion groups were set up on social networks like Facebook so students could help each other, forming what Thrun called an “entire counterculture.”


50 Companies Team to Create Open Source EV

The StreetScooter is a $7,000 EV with a 74 mph top speed and an 80-mile range. It relies on leased batteries and uses a heat pump for heating and air conditioning, and shipping company DHL has already ordered 3,500 of them — but the most interesting thing about the vehicle is how it came to be.
What began as a partnership of 10 companies has grown to a collaboration among more than 50 auto parts suppliers, tech companies and software developers. Each one of them had a hand not only in building the StreetScooter, but in creating it.
Full Story: Wired

emergentfutures:

50 Companies Team to Create Open Source EV


The StreetScooter is a $7,000 EV with a 74 mph top speed and an 80-mile range. It relies on leased batteries and uses a heat pump for heating and air conditioning, and shipping company DHL has already ordered 3,500 of them — but the most interesting thing about the vehicle is how it came to be.

What began as a partnership of 10 companies has grown to a collaboration among more than 50 auto parts suppliers, tech companies and software developers. Each one of them had a hand not only in building the StreetScooter, but in creating it.

Full Story: Wired

emergentfutures:

IBM open-sources ‘Internet of Things’ protocol | KurzweilAI
IBM announced it is joining with Italy-based hardware architecture  firm  Eurotech in donating a complete draft protocol for asynchronous   inter-device communication to the Eclipse Foundation, ReadWriteWeb reports.
A  projected 24 billion simultaneous devices — sending billions of  messages per hour —  including  RFID tags on shipping crates, heart rate  monitors, GPS devices,  smartphone firmware, automobile maintenance  systems, and even earrings may become more socially active than any teenager presently  alive by the year 2020.
The new asynchronous  inter-device communication protocol is called Message Queuing Telemetry Transport (MQTT), the machine-to-machine counterpart of HTTP (used on websites).

IBM open-sources ‘Internet of Things’ protocol | KurzweilAI

IBM announced it is joining with Italy-based hardware architecture firm Eurotech in donating a complete draft protocol for asynchronous inter-device communication to the Eclipse Foundation, ReadWriteWeb reports.

A projected 24 billion simultaneous devices — sending billions of messages per hour — including RFID tags on shipping crates, heart rate monitors, GPS devices, smartphone firmware, automobile maintenance systems, and even earrings may become more socially active than any teenager presently alive by the year 2020.

The new asynchronous inter-device communication protocol is called Message Queuing Telemetry Transport (MQTT), the machine-to-machine counterpart of HTTP (used on websites).