How mobile has changed daily news consumption and why you need to understand it
We all know smartphones and tablets have revolutionised how consumers access media content. But away from the big picture there are essential details to consider, such as when consumers access your content.
The Financial Times is just one business investing a great deal of resources in analysing digital usage patterns. The graph below shows subscriber access during the day - the blue section shows desktop and laptop access and the orange section shows mobile devices. 
Full Story: MediaBriefingDaily

How mobile has changed daily news consumption and why you need to understand it

We all know smartphones and tablets have revolutionised how consumers access media content. But away from the big picture there are essential details to consider, such as when consumers access your content.

The Financial Times is just one business investing a great deal of resources in analysing digital usage patterns. The graph below shows subscriber access during the day - the blue section shows desktop and laptop access and the orange section shows mobile devices. 

Full Story: MediaBriefingDaily

(via futuresagency)

Your Life as Data: The Rise of Personal Annual Reports | Mashable
Every time he drinks a cup of coffee, Dan Meyer makes a note on his phone. He does the same every time he opens a beer, turns on his TV or travels away from home. At the end of each month, he spends about three hours transferring these meticulously gathered notes into an excel spreadsheet. Meyer isn’t obsessive compulsive, he just likes data. Like an increasing number of data geeks, he uses his personal life as a project — compiling small events into a sometimes elaborate, graphic annual report each January.

Your Life as Data: The Rise of Personal Annual Reports | Mashable

Every time he drinks a cup of coffee, Dan Meyer makes a note on his phone. He does the same every time he opens a beer, turns on his TV or travels away from home. At the end of each month, he spends about three hours transferring these meticulously gathered notes into an excel spreadsheet. Meyer isn’t obsessive compulsive, he just likes data. Like an increasing number of data geeks, he uses his personal life as a project — compiling small events into a sometimes elaborate, graphic annual report each January.

Lower Costs and Better Care for Neediest Patients
Source: The New Yorker
The Hot Spotters
Can we lower medical costs by giving the neediest patients better care?
 by Atul Gawande 
Writer tells about Jeffrey Brenner, a physician in Camden, New Jersey, who has used data mining and statistical analysis to map health-care use and expenses. His calculations revealed that just one per cent of the hundred thousand people who made use of Camden’s medical facilities accounted for thirty per cent of its costs. That’s only a thousand people—about half the size of a typical family physician’s panel of patients. In his experience the people with the highest medical costs—the people cycling in and out of the hospital—were usually the people receiving the worst care.
 Read more http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/01/24/110124fa_fact_gawande#ixzz1CCBTM9nV

Lower Costs and Better Care for Neediest Patients

Source: The New Yorker

The Hot Spotters

Can we lower medical costs by giving the neediest patients better care?

by Atul Gawande

Writer tells about Jeffrey Brenner, a physician in Camden, New Jersey, who has used data mining and statistical analysis to map health-care use and expenses. His calculations revealed that just one per cent of the hundred thousand people who made use of Camden’s medical facilities accounted for thirty per cent of its costs. That’s only a thousand people—about half the size of a typical family physician’s panel of patients. In his experience the people with the highest medical costs—the people cycling in and out of the hospital—were usually the people receiving the worst care.


Read more http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/01/24/110124fa_fact_gawande#ixzz1CCBTM9nV

Human behavior is 93 percent predictable, a group of leading Northeastern University network scientists recently found. Distinguished Professor of Physics Albert-László Barabási and his team studied the mobility patterns of anonymous cell-phone users and concluded that, despite the common perception that our actions are random and unpredictable, human mobility follows surprisingly regular patterns. The team’s research is published in the current issue of Science magazine.

The Top 25 Words of the Decade from 2000 - 2009

1. Global Warming (2000)

2. 9/11 (2001)

3. Obama (2008)

4. Bailout (2008)

5. Evacuee/refugee (2005):  (Survivors of Katrina who had to be rescued)

6. Derivative (2007)

7. Google (2007)

8. Surge (2007)

9. Chinglish (2005)

10. Tsunami (2004)

11. H1N1 (2009)

12. Subprime ( 2007)

13. dot.com (2000)

14. Y2K ( 2000)

15. Misunderestimate (2002)

16. Chad ( 2000):  (a la "Hanging Chad" in Florida after the Bush vs. Gore election)

17. Twitter (2008 )

18. WMD (2002) (Weapons of Mass Destruction)

19. Blog (2003)

20. Texting (2004)

21. Slumdog (2008) (Popularized by Slumdog Millionaire)

22. Sustainable (2006)

23. Brokeback (2004) (From Brokeback Mountain)

24. Quagmire (2004) (Referring to the Iraq War)

25. Truthiness (2006) (A contribution from Stephen Colbert)

Cabspotting traces San Francisco’s taxi cabs as they travel throughout the Bay Area. The patterns traced by each cab create a living and always-changing map of city life. This map hints at economic, social, and cultural trends that are otherwise invisible. The Exploratorium has invited artists and researchers to use this information to reveal these “Invisible Dynamics.” (via Cabspotting)

Cabspotting traces San Francisco’s taxi cabs as they travel throughout the Bay Area. The patterns traced by each cab create a living and always-changing map of city life. This map hints at economic, social, and cultural trends that are otherwise invisible. The Exploratorium has invited artists and researchers to use this information to reveal these “Invisible Dynamics.” (via Cabspotting)

Media Cloud is a system that lets you see the flow of the media. The Internet is fundamentally altering the way that news is produced and distributed, but there are few comprehensive approaches to understanding the nature of these changes. Media Cloud automatically builds an archive of news stories and blog posts from the web, applies language processing, and gives you ways to analyze and visualize the data. The system is still in early development, but we invite you to explore our current data and suggest research ideas. This is an open-source project, and we will be releasing all of the code soon. You can read more background on the project or just get started below. (via Media Cloud)

Media Cloud is a system that lets you see the flow of the media. The Internet is fundamentally altering the way that news is produced and distributed, but there are few comprehensive approaches to understanding the nature of these changes. Media Cloud automatically builds an archive of news stories and blog posts from the web, applies language processing, and gives you ways to analyze and visualize the data. The system is still in early development, but we invite you to explore our current data and suggest research ideas. This is an open-source project, and we will be releasing all of the code soon. You can read more background on the project or just get started below. (via Media Cloud)

A powerful computing tool that allows scientists to extract features and patterns from enormously large and complex sets of raw data has been developed by scientists at University of California, Davis, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The tool - a set of problem-solving calculations known as an algorithm - is compact enough to run on computers with as little as two gigabytes of memory. (via New tool enables powerful data analysis)

A powerful computing tool that allows scientists to extract features and patterns from enormously large and complex sets of raw data has been developed by scientists at University of California, Davis, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The tool - a set of problem-solving calculations known as an algorithm - is compact enough to run on computers with as little as two gigabytes of memory. (via New tool enables powerful data analysis)

Reality mining … is all about paying attention to patterns in life and using that information to help [with] things like setting privacy patterns, sharing things with people, notifying people—basically, to help you live your life. Researchers have been mining data from the physical world for years Sensors in manufacturing plants tell operators when equipment is faulty, and cameras on highways monitor traffic flow. But now … reality mining is getting personal. Within the next few years … reality mining will become more common, thanks in part to the proliferation and increasing sophistication of cell phones. Many handheld devices now have the processing power of low-end desktop computers, and they can also collect more varied data, thanks to devices such as GPS chips that track location.

Losing sleep over your commute? You’re not alone.

To better understand the effects of traffic congestion from the perspective of a commuter, IBM’s Institute for Electronic Government presents a report that summarizes survey results from over 4,000 drivers in ten major U.S cities.

IBM - Pained by gas prices?