A Big Step Toward a Silicon Quantum ComputerQuantum computers could more easily become a reality if they incorporated the silicon semiconductor processing used by the modern electronics industry. Physicists in Australia have recently taken a new step toward that vision by reading and writing the nuclear spin state of a single phosphorus atom implanted in silicon.In a breakthrough reported in the 18 April edition of the journal Nature, physicists have finally achieved an idea first proposed in 1998 by Bruce Kane, a physicist at the University of Maryland, in College Park. Such success could lead to quantum computers based on the same silicon-processing technology used for computer chips.“What we are trying to do is demonstrate that there is a viable way to take the same physical platform and fabrication technology used to make any computer and mobile phone in the world, and twist it into a technology for quantum information processing,” says Andrea Morello, a quantum physicist at the University of New South Wales, in Australia.Scientists envision quantum computers as the ideal devices for cracking modern encryption codes, searching through huge databases, and understanding the biological interactions of molecules and drugs. Quantum computing’s potential comes from harnessing the laws of quantum physics that allow the spin state of an electron or an atom’s nucleus to achieve “superposition”—existing in more than one state at a time. A classical computer bit can exist either as a 1 or a 0, but a quantum bit, or qubit, is capable of existing in multiple states at the same time.With other quantum computing approaches, researchers have tried trapping and isolating atoms by using electromagnetic fields or superconductor materials. By comparison, Kane suggested harnessing the nuclear spin of phosphorus atoms embedded in a silicon crystal as a qubit.Silicon-based quantum computing also offers long coherence times for electron and nuclear spins, Kane says. That means the electron spin states and nuclear spin states acting as qubits could hold on to their information for long periods of time, something that other quantum computing schemes have struggled with.
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A Big Step Toward a Silicon Quantum Computer

Quantum computers could more easily become a reality if they incorporated the silicon semiconductor processing used by the modern electronics industry. Physicists in Australia have recently taken a new step toward that vision by reading and writing the nuclear spin state of a single phosphorus atom implanted in silicon.

In a breakthrough reported in the 18 April edition of the journal Nature, physicists have finally achieved an idea first proposed in 1998 by Bruce Kane, a physicist at the University of Maryland, in College Park. Such success could lead to quantum computers based on the same silicon-processing technology used for computer chips.

“What we are trying to do is demonstrate that there is a viable way to take the same physical platform and fabrication technology used to make any computer and mobile phone in the world, and twist it into a technology for quantum information processing,” says Andrea Morello, a quantum physicist at the University of New South Wales, in Australia.

Scientists envision quantum computers as the ideal devices for cracking modern encryption codes, searching through huge databases, and understanding the biological interactions of molecules and drugs. Quantum computing’s potential comes from harnessing the laws of quantum physics that allow the spin state of an electron or an atom’s nucleus to achieve “superposition”—existing in more than one state at a time. A classical computer bit can exist either as a 1 or a 0, but a quantum bit, or qubit, is capable of existing in multiple states at the same time.

With other quantum computing approaches, researchers have tried trapping and isolating atoms by using electromagnetic fields or superconductor materials. By comparison, Kane suggested harnessing the nuclear spin of phosphorus atoms embedded in a silicon crystal as a qubit.

Silicon-based quantum computing also offers long coherence times for electron and nuclear spins, Kane says. That means the electron spin states and nuclear spin states acting as qubits could hold on to their information for long periods of time, something that other quantum computing schemes have struggled with.

Read more.

(via emergentfutures)

New Plasma Device Considered The ‘Holy Grail’ Of Energy Generation And Storage
Scientists at the University of Missouri have devised a new way to create and control plasma that could transform American energy generation and storage.
Randy Curry, professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Missouri’s College of Engineering, and his team developed a device that launches a ring of plasma at distances of up to two feet. Although the plasma reaches a temperature hotter than the surface of the sun, it doesn’t emit radiation and is completely safe in proximity to humans.
While most of us are familiar with three states of matter – liquid, gas and solid – there is also a fourth state known as plasma, which includes things such as fire and lightning. Life on Earth depends on the energy emitted by plasma produced during fusion reactions within the sun.
The secret to Curry’s success was developing a way to make plasma form its own self-magnetic field, which holds it together as it travels through the air.
“Launching plasma in open air is the ‘Holy Grail’ in the field of physics,” said Curry.
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New Plasma Device Considered The ‘Holy Grail’ Of Energy Generation And Storage

Scientists at the University of Missouri have devised a new way to create and control plasma that could transform American energy generation and storage.

Randy Curry, professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Missouri’s College of Engineering, and his team developed a device that launches a ring of plasma at distances of up to two feet. Although the plasma reaches a temperature hotter than the surface of the sun, it doesn’t emit radiation and is completely safe in proximity to humans.

While most of us are familiar with three states of matter – liquid, gas and solid – there is also a fourth state known as plasma, which includes things such as fire and lightning. Life on Earth depends on the energy emitted by plasma produced during fusion reactions within the sun.

The secret to Curry’s success was developing a way to make plasma form its own self-magnetic field, which holds it together as it travels through the air.

“Launching plasma in open air is the ‘Holy Grail’ in the field of physics,” said Curry.

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(via republicofideas)

Inside The Largest Simulation Of The Universe Ever Created | Popular Science
Simulating Matter Distribution Across The Cosmos  Joe Insley and the HACC team, Argonne National Laboratory.
Sometime next month, the world’s third-fastest supercomputer —known as Mira—will complete tests of its new upgraded software and begin running the largest cosmological simulations ever performed at Argonne National Laboratory. These simulations are massive, taking in huge amounts of data from the latest generation of high-fidelity sky surveys and crunching it into models of the universe that are larger, higher-resolution, and more statistically accurate than any that have come before. When it’s done, scientists should have some amazing high-quality visualizations of the so-called “cosmic web” that connects the universe as we understand it. And they’ll have the best statistical models of the cosmos that cosmologists have ever seen.

Inside The Largest Simulation Of The Universe Ever Created | Popular Science

Simulating Matter Distribution Across The Cosmos Joe Insley and the HACC team, Argonne National Laboratory.


Sometime next month, the world’s third-fastest supercomputer —known as Mira—will complete tests of its new upgraded software and begin running the largest cosmological simulations ever performed at Argonne National Laboratory. These simulations are massive, taking in huge amounts of data from the latest generation of high-fidelity sky surveys and crunching it into models of the universe that are larger, higher-resolution, and more statistically accurate than any that have come before. When it’s done, scientists should have some amazing high-quality visualizations of the so-called “cosmic web” that connects the universe as we understand it. And they’ll have the best statistical models of the cosmos that cosmologists have ever seen.

Graphene Films Enabling Miracle Nanomaterials
Source: Smarter Technology

Pure carbon thin-films just nanometers thick are enabling a new era of miracle applications, from windshields so slick they don’t require wipers to thermoelectric materials that drastically reduce energy generation costs by harvesting waste heat.

Graphene—pure carbon thin-film—has a wide variety of uses beyond its potential in semiconductor manufacturing, from reducing the drag on ships’ hulls to recovering lost energy at coal-fired electricity generation plants, according to separate research projects at Vanderbilt University and the Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN) at Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland).

Graphene Films Enabling Miracle Nanomaterials

Source: Smarter Technology

  • Pure carbon thin-films just nanometers thick are enabling a new era of miracle applications, from windshields so slick they don’t require wipers to thermoelectric materials that drastically reduce energy generation costs by harvesting waste heat.
  • Graphene—pure carbon thin-film—has a wide variety of uses beyond its potential in semiconductor manufacturing, from reducing the drag on ships’ hulls to recovering lost energy at coal-fired electricity generation plants, according to separate research projects at Vanderbilt University and the Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN) at Trinity College (Dublin, Ireland).

Scientists have been plagued by Einstein’s theories which state nothing can travel faster than light. But over the past decade or so, we have seen a new branch of physics theorized, one which might give Einstein cause for pause. It’s called Superluminal Electromagnetic Field / Wave Propagation, which is basically a form of faster than light relativity. Experiments have been conducted by several scientists which involve light and radio sources traveling at speeds well in excess of the speed of light. Seem possible? Earlier this year, a physicist called John Singleton created an application of this theory which he believes could greatly advance semiconductors. Called a polarization synchrotron, the device combines radio waves with a rapidly spinning magnetic field. The effect is described as “abusing the radio waves so severely that they finally give in and travel faster than light”. (via Faster-than-light radio waves could revolutionize computer industries – New Tech Gadgets & Electronic Devices | Geek.com)

Scientists have been plagued by Einstein’s theories which state nothing can travel faster than light. But over the past decade or so, we have seen a new branch of physics theorized, one which might give Einstein cause for pause. It’s called Superluminal Electromagnetic Field / Wave Propagation, which is basically a form of faster than light relativity. Experiments have been conducted by several scientists which involve light and radio sources traveling at speeds well in excess of the speed of light. Seem possible? Earlier this year, a physicist called John Singleton created an application of this theory which he believes could greatly advance semiconductors. Called a polarization synchrotron, the device combines radio waves with a rapidly spinning magnetic field. The effect is described as “abusing the radio waves so severely that they finally give in and travel faster than light”. (via Faster-than-light radio waves could revolutionize computer industries – New Tech Gadgets & Electronic Devices | Geek.com)

Big Bangs, big TOEs, ICT and ‘doing’ science

Approximately 15 petabytes of data will be recorded, catalogued, managed, distributed and processed each year. It would take a stack of CDs 20 kilometers high to record this much data.

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