To feed another 2 billion people, the world will need to produce 70 percent more food, and up to 100 percent more in developing countries.

centerforinvestigativereporting:

Just one of the food-and-water facts from the campaign organizers at the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization.

(via climateadaptation)

7 Billion: How Did We Get So Big So Fast? (by npr)

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

As higher standards of living and better health care are reaching more parts of the world, the rates of fertility — and population growth — have started to slow down, though the population will continue to grow for the foreseeable future.

U.N. forecasts suggest the world population could hit a peak of 10.1 billion by 2100 before beginning to decline. But exact numbers are hard to come by — just small variations in fertility rates could mean a population of 15 billion by the end of the century.

Produced by Adam Cole
Cinematography by Maggie Starbard

To solve the energy challenge, we will have to find a way to produce, every day, not just what we are producing right now, but at least twice that much. We will need to increase our energy output by a minimum factor of two, the generally agreed upon number, certainly by the middle of the century, but preferably well before that—despite the fact that oil and gas will have long since peaked. Considering that many people on the planet are not using much energy at all and that new energy sources have yet to be developed, billions of people would still be living without modern energy.

To give all 10 billion people on the planet the level of energy prosperity we in the developed world are used to, a couple of kilowatt-hours per person, we would need to generate 60 terawatts around the planet—the equivalent of 900 million barrels of oil per day.

Future Global Energy Prosperity: The Terawatt Challenge

In 2004, the late Nobel laureate, Richard Smalley, one of the pioneers of nanotechnology, shared this incisive report on the future of the world’s energy needs. With world population passing 7 billion, this assessment is even more salient seven years later.


7 challenges for 7 billion
This week the world’s population ticked over to 7 billion. By 2050 that number is expected to grow to 9 billion.
From water shortages to rising sea levels, experts from the University of New South Wales and the University of Melbourne paint a grim future for life on Earth.
They forecast dramatic changes unless significant steps are taken to curb population growth.
Here seven academics outline seven challenges they say a population of 7 billion must confront.
Full Story: ABC

emergentfutures:

7 challenges for 7 billion

This week the world’s population ticked over to 7 billion. By 2050 that number is expected to grow to 9 billion.

From water shortages to rising sea levels, experts from the University of New South Wales and the University of Melbourne paint a grim future for life on Earth.

They forecast dramatic changes unless significant steps are taken to curb population growth.

Here seven academics outline seven challenges they say a population of 7 billion must confront.

Full Story: ABC

emergentfutures:

What was the greatest invention of the industrial revolution? Hans Rosling makes the case for the washing machine. With newly designed graphics from Gapminder, Rosling shows us the magic that pops up when economic growth and electricity turn a boring wash day into an intellectual day of reading.

Hans Rosling on washing machines. This man is a genius.

via craigkanarick:

Hans Rosling on global population growth (via TEDtalksDirector)

The world’s population will grow to 9 billion over the next 50 years — and only by raising the living standards of the poorest can we check population growth. This is the paradoxical answer that Hans Rosling unveils at TED@Cannes using colorful new data display technology (you’ll see).

The Tale of a Smarter City (via IBMSocialMedia)

"A city is more than just a collection of buildings, streets, parks, and people, and the many different entities engaged in many different trades.

Its a living environment of different cultures, peoples, ideas and systems that are interdependent yet all determine and shape the others identity.”

The story of smarter cities — told through simple narration, music and illustrations.

Words, voice, sound: Chris Luongo
Art: Jane Harris

As populations grow at a fast clip, they are placing greater demands on the city infrastructures that deliver vital services such as transportation, healthcare, education and public safety. Adding to the strain are ever-changing public demands for better education, greener programs, accessible government, affordable housing and more options for senior citizens.

IBM - A smarter planet - Smarter cities

As populations grow at a fast clip, they are placing greater demands on the city infrastructures that deliver vital services such as transportation, healthcare, education and public safety. Adding to the strain are ever-changing public demands for better education, greener programs, accessible government, affordable housing and more options for senior citizens.

IBM - A smarter planet - Smarter cities