BBC - Future - Technology - Tomorrow’s world: A guide to the next 150 years
As we begin a new year, BBC Future has compiled 40 intriguing predictions made by scientists, politicians, journalists, bloggers and other assorted pundits in recent years about the shape of the world from 2013 to 2150.

BBC - Future - Technology - Tomorrow’s world: A guide to the next 150 years

As we begin a new year, BBC Future has compiled 40 intriguing predictions made by scientists, politicians, journalists, bloggers and other assorted pundits in recent years about the shape of the world from 2013 to 2150.

Advanced Tornado Technology Could Reduce Deaths : NPR
Tornadoes have killed at least 530 people in the U.S. this year, the highest death toll since 1950.
But  researchers say they are working on new detection and forecasting  technologies that could help reduce tornado deaths in the future.
One  of those technologies got put to the test on May 24 when a tornado  touched down near Chickasha, Okla., and began heading northeast at near  freeway speed.
The National Weather Service  was tracking the twister with radar, which uses bursts of radio waves to  gauge the shape, power and direction of a storm. And data from Weather  Service radar showed the tornado would cross the southern part of  Newcastle about 25 miles up Interstate 44. So officials in Newcastle  sent emergency crews to that part of the city.
But by chance, the storm was also being tracked by a separate,  experimental radar system designed to give more precise information. And  as the tornado approached Newcastle, the city’s emergency manager was  studying data from that system."Based on that data, he could  see that the tornado was actually taking a turn to the north," says  Brenda Philips, who works for a group called CASA (Collaborative  Adapting Sensing of the Atmosphere) that developed the new radar system.
So  the emergency manager moved the first responders north, which allowed  them to move into the affected areas more quickly, Philips says.
It  was a big success for CASA, which was founded by several universities  specifically to improve weather radar systems. The group receives  funding from the National Science Foundation.
The  CASA radars did a better job than traditional radars because they were  able to provide a fresh image of the storm every minute, says Michael  Zink, from the electrical and computer engineering department at the  University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Advanced Tornado Technology Could Reduce Deaths : NPR

Tornadoes have killed at least 530 people in the U.S. this year, the highest death toll since 1950.

But researchers say they are working on new detection and forecasting technologies that could help reduce tornado deaths in the future.

One of those technologies got put to the test on May 24 when a tornado touched down near Chickasha, Okla., and began heading northeast at near freeway speed.

The National Weather Service was tracking the twister with radar, which uses bursts of radio waves to gauge the shape, power and direction of a storm. And data from Weather Service radar showed the tornado would cross the southern part of Newcastle about 25 miles up Interstate 44. So officials in Newcastle sent emergency crews to that part of the city.

But by chance, the storm was also being tracked by a separate, experimental radar system designed to give more precise information. And as the tornado approached Newcastle, the city’s emergency manager was studying data from that system.

"Based on that data, he could see that the tornado was actually taking a turn to the north," says Brenda Philips, who works for a group called CASA (Collaborative Adapting Sensing of the Atmosphere) that developed the new radar system.

So the emergency manager moved the first responders north, which allowed them to move into the affected areas more quickly, Philips says.

It was a big success for CASA, which was founded by several universities specifically to improve weather radar systems. The group receives funding from the National Science Foundation.

The CASA radars did a better job than traditional radars because they were able to provide a fresh image of the storm every minute, says Michael Zink, from the electrical and computer engineering department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Closing the Tax Gap: IBM’s New Business Analytics Offering for Smarter Tax Collections

IBM is expanding its fraud and abuse management portfolio with a new offering aimed at optimizing the collection of delinquent tax debts for governments around the world. The IBM Tax Collections Optimizer uses new IBM patented analytics technology to help governments identify the most effective and efficient methods to collect taxes from delinquent debtors. This new tool is designed to help close the gap between revenues owed and those actually collected.

For more see IBM’s Business Analytics & Optimization interactive presskit: http://www.ibm.com/press/analytics

A  special report on managing information: Data, data everywhere | The  Economist
The world contains an unimaginably vast amount of digital information which is getting ever vaster ever more rapidly. This makes it possible to do many things that previously could not be done: spot business trends, prevent diseases, combat crime and so on. Managed well, the data can be used to unlock new sources of economic value, provide fresh insights into science and hold governments to account.

A special report on managing information: Data, data everywhere | The Economist

The world contains an unimaginably vast amount of digital information which is getting ever vaster ever more rapidly. This makes it possible to do many things that previously could not be done: spot business trends, prevent diseases, combat crime and so on. Managed well, the data can be used to unlock new sources of economic value, provide fresh insights into science and hold governments to account.

14  New APIs on Programmable Web: Create PDF Files, Predict Flight Delays, ZIP Code Lookup,  Project Management, Legal Dictionary, and Music Playlists
This week we had 14 new APIs added to our API directory ranging from a new music playlist API, a web service for storing and reading ePub-format books, a useful travel API for predicting airline flight delays, a new life sciences API, a web service API for synonyms, thesaurus and antonyms, an API for generating PDF files, an API for creating avatars, an API that gets you access to a legal dictionary, a project management API, as well as a variety of other new APIs.
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14 New APIs on Programmable Web: Create PDF Files, Predict Flight Delays, ZIP Code Lookup, Project Management, Legal Dictionary, and Music Playlists

This week we had 14 new APIs added to our API directory ranging from a new music playlist API, a web service for storing and reading ePub-format books, a useful travel API for predicting airline flight delays, a new life sciences API, a web service API for synonyms, thesaurus and antonyms, an API for generating PDF files, an API for creating avatars, an API that gets you access to a legal dictionary, a project management API, as well as a variety of other new APIs.

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IBM Supercomputers Power Up Weather Forecasts

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has completed a nine-year, $180 million IBM supercomputer build-out for weather and climate prediction.


The two new systems, dubbed Stratus and Cirrus, will let NOAA run more complex models in an effort tol boost the nation’s watch and warning lead times for tornadoes, floods, hurricanes, tsunamis, and winter storms.

The two supercomputers run as primary and backup in tandem, and are both based on IBM Power 575 Systems. The main Stratus supercomputer will process gigabytes of weather data each day, including temperature, wind, atmospheric pressure, and satellite and oceanographic data.

The computers are capable of making 69.7 trillion calculations per second. NOAA said that’s the equivalent of one person with a calculator working for three million years.

via ibmfan:


Via: http://www.goodcleantech.com/

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Today’s Customers Expect More
Differentiation drives profit. The problem is, product differentiation has become increasingly difficult these days. The opportunity lies in your retail enterprise. With more efficient processes, your business will work more efficiently and more profitably.
Retail merchandising and supply chain solutions

Today’s Customers Expect More

Differentiation drives profit. The problem is, product differentiation has become increasingly difficult these days. The opportunity lies in your retail enterprise. With more efficient processes, your business will work more efficiently and more profitably.

Retail merchandising and supply chain solutions

Much as meteorologists predict the path and intensity of hurricanes, Indiana University’s Alessandro Vespignani believes we will one day predict with unprecedented foresight, specificity and scale such things as the economic and social effects of billions of new Internet users in China and India, or the exact location and number of airline flights to cancel around the world in order to halt the spread of a pandemic.

TOKYO - 08 Jul 2009: IBM today announced the launch of its Tokyo-based IBM Analytics Solution center which is part of a recently announced global network of analytics focused centers. Through these centers, IBM is addressing the growing demand for advanced analytics capabilities need to help clients build smarter business systems and drive improved decision-making.

The new center is co-located at IBM’s Marunouchi office in Tokyo as well as at IBM’s Yamato Lab in Kanagawa Prefecture. It will draw on a wealth of global IBM expertise, including more than 150 mathematicians and software engineers at IBM Research - Tokyo and Yamato Software Development Laboratory to help companies turn data into predictive intelligence.

Much ado has been made about smart grid energy management, but what about smart water management? IBM and the Netherlands city of Rotterdam are collaborating on a forecasting system for water and energy management. The dashboard-based system—the first of its kind—will collect and analyze real-time data on ocean, rivers, and weather, all in a move to make Rotterdam the first Smart Delta City. (via Rotterdam: The Smart Delta City of the Future | Sustainability | Fast Company)

Much ado has been made about smart grid energy management, but what about smart water management? IBM and the Netherlands city of Rotterdam are collaborating on a forecasting system for water and energy management. The dashboard-based system—the first of its kind—will collect and analyze real-time data on ocean, rivers, and weather, all in a move to make Rotterdam the first Smart Delta City. (via Rotterdam: The Smart Delta City of the Future | Sustainability | Fast Company)

Smarter Healthcare Channel

With healthcare reform taking centerstage in Washington in the weeks and months ahead, we wanted to share this section of clips in the IBM Global Business Services Video Studio, which debuted with the launch of IBM’s new consulting organization, Business Analytics & Optimization.