Incorporating data-mining and analysis tools, Course Signals not only predicts how well students are likely to do in a particular class, but can also detect early warning signals for those who are struggling, enabling an intervention before problems reach a critical point. Results so far are impressive. According to data released by Purdue last month, six-year graduation rates are up 21.48% since the project’s start, while grades for those students who use Signals in two or more classes are improved significantly next to those who don’t.

According to the McKinsey Global Institute, using data to better predict the healthcare needs of the U.S. population could save between $300 and $450 billion. (via NetAppVoice: Scientists Save Healthcare (But They’re Not From Med School) - Forbes)

According to the McKinsey Global Institute, using data to better predict the healthcare needs of the U.S. population could save between $300 and $450 billion. (via NetAppVoice: Scientists Save Healthcare (But They’re Not From Med School) - Forbes)

(via futuristgerd)

Predicting Postpartum Changes in Emotion and Behavior via Social Media | Follow the Crowd
Analysis  of Twitter posts predicted postpartum depression with up to  80% accuracy using a mathematical model based on factors such as volume of activity, ego-centric network characteristics, emotion, and linguistic styles.

Predicting Postpartum Changes in Emotion and Behavior via Social Media | Follow the Crowd

Analysis  of Twitter posts predicted postpartum depression with up to  80% accuracy using a mathematical model based on factors such as volume of activity, ego-centric network characteristics, emotion, and linguistic styles.

(via ibmsocialbiz)

IBM is running in partnership with police departments across the nation, crunching massive amounts of public information to try to predict where and when crimes will occur. The project, known as CRUSH — Criminal Reduction Utilizing Statistical History — has proven very effective in pilot programs in several American cities, including Memphis, Tennessee, where it been credited with reducing serious crimes by 30 percent and violent crimes by 15 percent

emergentfutures:

What Happens When Our Cellphones Can Predict Our Every Move?



Your cellphone knows where you’ve been. And new research shows it can take a pretty good guess at where you’re going next.


A team of British researchers has developed an algorithm that uses tracking data on people’s phones to predict where they’ll be in 24 hours. The average error: just 20 meters.
Paul Higgins: You need to be careful when interpreting this because an average error of 20 metres hides a lot of information. For instance if the sampling is every minute then the average becomes lower because most people will be at home or work most of the time.
Full Story: Slate

emergentfutures:

What Happens When Our Cellphones Can Predict Our Every Move?



Your cellphone knows where you’ve been. And new research shows it can take a pretty good guess at where you’re going next.

A team of British researchers has developed an algorithm that uses tracking data on people’s phones to predict where they’ll be in 24 hours. The average error: just 20 meters.

Paul Higgins: You need to be careful when interpreting this because an average error of 20 metres hides a lot of information. For instance if the sampling is every minute then the average becomes lower because most people will be at home or work most of the time.

Full Story: Slate

Contextual prediction is hot. I am not just saying that because I am in the prediction, forecasting and analysis business. I am talking, for instance, about the ability that businesses have to predict what we are going to buy, how much we are willing to pay, whether we can pay to begin with, whether we are potentially fraudulent and so on. Business intelligence and analytics software vendors provide tried and tested tools to telecoms operators giving useful contextual intelligence about their (potential) customers in the virtual and connected ecosystem.

Contextual prediction is hot in the physical world as well. Through sensors the Apple iPhone knows it should power off the touch screen if I bring the phone to my ear. It predicts I am making a call. The Samsung Galaxy S3 predicts I am reading an e-book because the front camera sensor says so. Smartly, it keeps the backlight on. Gesture-controlled laptops shut off automatically if I walk out of the room. Through the Doppler effect measured by the built-in microphone and speakers the laptop predicts I will not need it for the time being.

Data mining opens the door to predictive neuroscience | KurzweilAI
Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) researchers havediscovered rules that relate the genes that a neuron switches on and off to the shape of that neuron, its electrical properties, and its location in the brain.
The discovery, using state-of-the-art computational tools, increases the likelihood that it will be possible to predict much of the fundamental structure and function of the brain without having to measure every aspect of it.
That in turn makes modeling the brain in silico — the goal of the proposedHuman Brain Project — a more realistic, less Herculean, prospect.
“It is the door that opens to a world of predictive biology,” says Prof. Henry Markram.

Data mining opens the door to predictive neuroscience | KurzweilAI

Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) researchers havediscovered rules that relate the genes that a neuron switches on and off to the shape of that neuron, its electrical properties, and its location in the brain.

The discovery, using state-of-the-art computational tools, increases the likelihood that it will be possible to predict much of the fundamental structure and function of the brain without having to measure every aspect of it.

That in turn makes modeling the brain in silico — the goal of the proposedHuman Brain Project — a more realistic, less Herculean, prospect.

“It is the door that opens to a world of predictive biology,” says Prof. Henry Markram.