Open Source Ecology - Global Village Construction Set
Open Source Ecology is a network of farmers, engineers, and supporters that for the last two years has been creating the Global Village Construction Set,  an open source, low-cost, high performance technological platform that  allows for the easy, DIY fabrication of the 50 different Industrial  Machines that it takes to build a sustainable civilization with modern  comforts. The GVCS lowers the barriers to entry into farming, building, and manufacturing and can be seen as a life-size lego-like set of modular tools that can create entire economies, whether in rural Missouri, where the project was founded, in urban redevelopment, or in the developing world.

Open Source Ecology - Global Village Construction Set

Open Source Ecology is a network of farmers, engineers, and supporters that for the last two years has been creating the Global Village Construction Set, an open source, low-cost, high performance technological platform that allows for the easy, DIY fabrication of the 50 different Industrial Machines that it takes to build a sustainable civilization with modern comforts. The GVCS lowers the barriers to entry into farming, building, and manufacturing and can be seen as a life-size lego-like set of modular tools that can create entire economies, whether in rural Missouri, where the project was founded, in urban redevelopment, or in the developing world.

Future of Technology - ‘Artificial leaf’ makes real fuel | msnbc.com
The ‘artificial leaf,’ a device that can harness sunlight to split water  into hydrogen and oxygen without needing any external connections, is  seen with some real leaves, which also convert the energy of sunlight  directly into storable chemical form.
It doesn’t look like the leaves changing colors and piling up on the  lawn, but a nature-inspired “artificial leaf” technology has taken a  notable step toward the goal of producing storable and clean energy to  power everything from factories to tablet computers.
The leaf is a  silicon solar cell coated with catalytic materials on its side that,  when placed in a container of water and exposed to sunlight, splits the  H2O into bubbles of oxygen and hydrogen. The hydrogen can be stored and  used as an energy source, for example to power a fuel cell.
"The device both captures the solar energy and stores it in the chemical  bonds of the hydrogen and oxygen that are produced from the water," Steven Reece, a research scientist with Sun Catalytix and lead author of a paper describing the breakthrough, told me Friday.

Future of Technology - ‘Artificial leaf’ makes real fuel | msnbc.com

The ‘artificial leaf,’ a device that can harness sunlight to split water into hydrogen and oxygen without needing any external connections, is seen with some real leaves, which also convert the energy of sunlight directly into storable chemical form.

It doesn’t look like the leaves changing colors and piling up on the lawn, but a nature-inspired “artificial leaf” technology has taken a notable step toward the goal of producing storable and clean energy to power everything from factories to tablet computers.

The leaf is a silicon solar cell coated with catalytic materials on its side that, when placed in a container of water and exposed to sunlight, splits the H2O into bubbles of oxygen and hydrogen. The hydrogen can be stored and used as an energy source, for example to power a fuel cell.

"The device both captures the solar energy and stores it in the chemical bonds of the hydrogen and oxygen that are produced from the water," Steven Reece, a research scientist with Sun Catalytix and lead author of a paper describing the breakthrough, told me Friday.

Step into the Smarter Planet Time Machine!
For a little Friday Fun, try one of these three settings:
…One Week Ago
…One Month Ago
…One Year Ago
Or to really rev up your Flux Capacitor, try the Random button to sample one of the more than 3600 posts about All Things Smarter since we went back to the future in Nov. 2008.
Want to hold Smarter Planet in your hand? Get the mobile apps for iOS and Android.
Of course, you can always browse through the misty mountains of Smarter Time via the Archive. Or for a real time warp, scroll through all the Time Machine posts.

Step into the Smarter Planet Time Machine!

For a little Friday Fun, try one of these three settings:

Or to really rev up your Flux Capacitor, try the Random button to sample one of the more than 3600 posts about All Things Smarter since we went back to the future in Nov. 2008.

Want to hold Smarter Planet in your hand? Get the mobile apps for iOS and Android.

Of course, you can always browse through the misty mountains of Smarter Time via the Archive. Or for a real time warp, scroll through all the Time Machine posts.

Verbally for iPad
Verbally is an amazing, comprehensive assisted speech solution for the iPad. Verbally is a top-selling Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) iPad app and it’s totally free. Unlike all other AAC solutions available, Verbally’s unique, simple design allows users to communicate quickly and effectively in any setting. Verbally enables creative communication, self-expression, and, most importantly, conversation.

Verbally for iPad

Verbally is an amazing, comprehensive assisted speech solution for the iPad. Verbally is a top-selling Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) iPad app and it’s totally free. Unlike all other AAC solutions available, Verbally’s unique, simple design allows users to communicate quickly and effectively in any setting. 

Verbally enables creative communication, self-expression, and, most importantly, conversation.

Sony’s head-mounted 3D visor is real, HMZ-T1 arrives in Japan November 11th - Engadget
Remember that crazy wearable 3D display concept Sony was showing off at CES 2011? Turns out the company is actually going to make it, and the HMZ-T1 is scheduled to be released in Japan on November 11th. While the design has changed slightly since we first laid our eyes, and heads, on it, the specs appear to be the same, with two 1280x720 0.7-inch OLED panels mounted in front of each eye giving the wearer an experience similar to viewing a 750-inch screen from 20m away, as well as 5.1 surround sound from headphones integrated into the Head Mounted Display (HMD). You can see the helmet above, as well as the processor unit (complete with HDMI input and output, so you can take off the helmet and watch on TV) that it must remain tethered to. Pricing is expected to be 60,000 yen ($783 US). Check out the press release and our hands-on video from CES after the break and decide if living out a Geordi La Forge-style fantasy is worth it.

Sony’s head-mounted 3D visor is real, HMZ-T1 arrives in Japan November 11th - Engadget

Remember that crazy wearable 3D display concept Sony was showing off at CES 2011? Turns out the company is actually going to make it, and the HMZ-T1 is scheduled to be released in Japan on November 11th. While the design has changed slightly since we first laid our eyes, and heads, on it, the specs appear to be the same, with two 1280x720 0.7-inch OLED panels mounted in front of each eye giving the wearer an experience similar to viewing a 750-inch screen from 20m away, as well as 5.1 surround sound from headphones integrated into the Head Mounted Display (HMD). You can see the helmet above, as well as the processor unit (complete with HDMI input and output, so you can take off the helmet and watch on TV) that it must remain tethered to. Pricing is expected to be 60,000 yen ($783 US). Check out the press release and our hands-on video from CES after the break and decide if living out a Geordi La Forge-style fantasy is worth it.


The Battery of the Future
What is the future of battery materials and construction?
Batteries have the potential to more efficiently power our portable devices, fuel our vehicles, and disrupt the way the electric grid works. But advances in battery technology have been slow to respond to the power demands of modern life.
Moore’s Law sees computer chips double in performance and drop their price by 50 percent every 18 to 24 months.  But batteries adhere to much slower experience curves that typically see them double in performance perhaps every ten years. The stubborn refusal of battery materials to yield in price and size explains the high cost of electric vehicles and grid storage

sneijers:

The Battery of the Future

What is the future of battery materials and construction?

Batteries have the potential to more efficiently power our portable devices, fuel our vehicles, and disrupt the way the electric grid works. But advances in battery technology have been slow to respond to the power demands of modern life.

Moore’s Law sees computer chips double in performance and drop their price by 50 percent every 18 to 24 months. But batteries adhere to much slower experience curves that typically see them double in performance perhaps every ten years. The stubborn refusal of battery materials to yield in price and size explains the high cost of electric vehicles and grid storage

sneijers:

(via sneijers)

 IBM VP : My Three Essentials For Creating Innovative New Products | Co. Design
BM’s Lee Green provides a road map for generating disruptive technologies, objects, and experiences.
No matter the forum or platform, designers, executives, and  consumers love to discuss (and use) products and services that seem to  break the mold. These ideas are disruptive, creative, and often  counterintuitive. A decade ago, who could have predicted that mobile  phones would take the place of digital cameras, for both still and video  images, in the minds and hands of consumers? Or that serious chefs  would consider food-truck businesses, once the domain of low-end  services but now a trendy, fast, and cost-effective way to open a  “restaurant”?
Onlookers often think that such marketplace and marketing successes  are products of one-off “aha” moments of inspiration or unique research  methods. But there are actual strategies that designers and businesses  can follow to create such disruptive technologies, objects, and  experiences. Here are my three tried-and-true tactics:
1. Support what is likely to fail.
By this I don’t mean prioritize experiments and concepts that look  like they might not sell; I mean consider technology and designs that  might not seem to work for their intended purposes. This is the approach  of James Dyson, the British engineer and vacuum entrepreneur, and the  company that bears his name. While developing breakthrough products,  such as the energy-saving hand-drying machine known as the Airblade,  Dyson and his team take note of what ideas and prototypes aren’t  achieving their goals and then find new uses for them.

 IBM VP : My Three Essentials For Creating Innovative New Products | Co. Design

BM’s Lee Green provides a road map for generating disruptive technologies, objects, and experiences.

No matter the forum or platform, designers, executives, and consumers love to discuss (and use) products and services that seem to break the mold. These ideas are disruptive, creative, and often counterintuitive. A decade ago, who could have predicted that mobile phones would take the place of digital cameras, for both still and video images, in the minds and hands of consumers? Or that serious chefs would consider food-truck businesses, once the domain of low-end services but now a trendy, fast, and cost-effective way to open a “restaurant”?

Onlookers often think that such marketplace and marketing successes are products of one-off “aha” moments of inspiration or unique research methods. But there are actual strategies that designers and businesses can follow to create such disruptive technologies, objects, and experiences. Here are my three tried-and-true tactics:

1. Support what is likely to fail.

By this I don’t mean prioritize experiments and concepts that look like they might not sell; I mean consider technology and designs that might not seem to work for their intended purposes. This is the approach of James Dyson, the British engineer and vacuum entrepreneur, and the company that bears his name. While developing breakthrough products, such as the energy-saving hand-drying machine known as the Airblade, Dyson and his team take note of what ideas and prototypes aren’t achieving their goals and then find new uses for them.

Self-inflating vehicle tires on the way - Motoring, Life & Style - The Independent
Drivers could soon be traveling in cars with self-inflating tires, according to reports from the US.
Tire manufacturer Goodyear confirmed last week that it is currently working on a tire with an  automatic pump embedded, which could keep the internal air pressure at  the recommended level.
The firm told Edmunds’  AutoObserver that its Air Maintenance Technology (AMT) tires will be  able to keep themselves at the optimum pressure with no need for  external pumps or trips to the garage.
The system is made possible by a miniature internal  pump, which is connected to pressure sensors in a self-contained unit  inside each tire.

Self-inflating vehicle tires on the way - Motoring, Life & Style - The Independent

Drivers could soon be traveling in cars with self-inflating tires, according to reports from the US.

Tire manufacturer Goodyear confirmed last week that it is currently working on a tire with an automatic pump embedded, which could keep the internal air pressure at the recommended level.

The firm told Edmunds’ AutoObserver that its Air Maintenance Technology (AMT) tires will be able to keep themselves at the optimum pressure with no need for external pumps or trips to the garage.

The system is made possible by a miniature internal pump, which is connected to pressure sensors in a self-contained unit inside each tire.