…using social technology as a business tool is unavoidable and, for many, a critical component for success. According to Forrester Research, the market opportunity for social enterprise apps is expected to grow at a rate of 61 percent through 2016.

So IBM made some calls—1,160 to be exact—to business and IT professionals to find out how their businesses were adopting, and adapting to, the social side of business. IBM found that across the board, companies are increasing their social technology investments, although it seems the reasons why remain a little foggy.

The survey revealed that while 46 percent of the organizations questioned increased their investments in social technologies in 2012, only 22 percent believed that managers are prepared to incorporate social tools and approaches into their daily practices.

Who invented the Internet?: The outrageous conservative claim that every tech innovation came from private enterprise. - Slate Magazine


Earlier this month, President Obama argued that wealthy business people owe some of their success to the government’s investment in education and basic infrastructure. He cited roads, bridges, and schools. Then he singled out the most clear-cut example of how government investment can spark huge business opportunities: the Internet.




“The Internet didn’t get invented on its own,” Obama said. “Government research created the Internet so that all the companies could make money off the Internet.”




Until recently this wouldn’t have been a controversial statement. Everyone in the tech world knows that the Internet got its start in the 1960s, when a team of computing pioneers at the Pentagon’s Advanced Research Projects Agency designed and deployed ARPANET, the first computer network that used “packet switching”—a communications system that splits up data and sends it across multiple paths toward its destination, which is the basic design of today’s Internet. According to most accounts, researchers working on ARPANET created many of the Internet’s defining features, including TCP/IP, the protocol on which today’s network operates. In the 1980s, they strung together various government and university networks together using TCP/IP—thus creating a single worldwide network, the Internet.



Suddenly, though, the government’s role in the Internet’s creation is being cast into doubt. “It’s an urban legend that the government launched the Internet,” Gordon Crovitz, the former publisher of the Wall Street Journal,argued Monday in a widely linkedJournal op-ed. Instead, Crovitz believes that “full credit” for the Internet’s creation ought to go to Xerox, whose Silicon Valley research facility, Xerox PARC, created the Ethernet networking standard as well as the first graphical computer (famously the inspiration for Apple’s Mac). According to Crovitz, not only did the government not create the Internet, it slowed its arrival—that researchers were hassled by “bureaucrats” who stymied the network’s success.




“It’s important to understand the history of the Internet because it’s too often wrongly cited to justify big government,” Crovitz says. I’ll give him one thing: It is important to understand the history of the Internet. Too bad he doesn’t seem interested in doing so.




Crovitz’s entire yarn is almost hysterically false. He gets basic history wrong, he gets the Internet’s defining technologies wrong, and, most importantly, he misses the important interplay between public and private funds that has been necessary for all great modern technological advances.

Who invented the Internet?: The outrageous conservative claim that every tech innovation came from private enterprise. - Slate Magazine

Earlier this month, President Obama argued that wealthy business people owe some of their success to the government’s investment in education and basic infrastructure. He cited roads, bridges, and schools. Then he singled out the most clear-cut example of how government investment can spark huge business opportunities: the Internet.

“The Internet didn’t get invented on its own,” Obama said. “Government research created the Internet so that all the companies could make money off the Internet.”

Until recently this wouldn’t have been a controversial statement. Everyone in the tech world knows that the Internet got its start in the 1960s, when a team of computing pioneers at the Pentagon’s Advanced Research Projects Agency designed and deployed ARPANET, the first computer network that used “packet switching”—a communications system that splits up data and sends it across multiple paths toward its destination, which is the basic design of today’s Internet. According to most accounts, researchers working on ARPANET created many of the Internet’s defining features, including TCP/IP, the protocol on which today’s network operates. In the 1980s, they strung together various government and university networks together using TCP/IP—thus creating a single worldwide network, the Internet.

Suddenly, though, the government’s role in the Internet’s creation is being cast into doubt. “It’s an urban legend that the government launched the Internet,” Gordon Crovitz, the former publisher of the Wall Street Journal,argued Monday in a widely linkedJournal op-ed. Instead, Crovitz believes that “full credit” for the Internet’s creation ought to go to Xerox, whose Silicon Valley research facility, Xerox PARC, created the Ethernet networking standard as well as the first graphical computer (famously the inspiration for Apple’s Mac). According to Crovitz, not only did the government not create the Internet, it slowed its arrival—that researchers were hassled by “bureaucrats” who stymied the network’s success.

“It’s important to understand the history of the Internet because it’s too often wrongly cited to justify big government,” Crovitz says. I’ll give him one thing: It is important to understand the history of the Internet. Too bad he doesn’t seem interested in doing so.

Crovitz’s entire yarn is almost hysterically false. He gets basic history wrong, he gets the Internet’s defining technologies wrong, and, most importantly, he misses the important interplay between public and private funds that has been necessary for all great modern technological advances.

Project Noah Gamifies all that Nature has to Offer | Gamification Blog
Ever wondered what plant rooted itself in your garden, or what strange  bug somehow survived the bitter cold outside to call your house its  home? Or maybe on vacation to warmer reaches, you came across a disturbingly large insect? Some might run the other way, but if you are like me, you’re asking “what the hell is that?” Project Noah brings together a community that can help. It’s been out for over a  year, and Project Noah has already engaged thousands of users in the  age-old game that has attracted the likes of Darwin and Teddy Roosevelt:  discovering and identifying nature’s treasures.
The web app is accessible and well designed, and the experience is also  available on iOS and Android for finding critters in the field.  Gamification features engage users towards contributing regularly. There  is not a leaderboard, but top photos of the day are featured and reward  users for contributing (check out yesterdays winning photo of a whale  shark from user JessyZich). The overall design of the website is excellent, drawing on many of the design philosophies of gamification and engagement.

Project Noah Gamifies all that Nature has to Offer | Gamification Blog

Ever wondered what plant rooted itself in your garden, or what strange bug somehow survived the bitter cold outside to call your house its home? Or maybe on vacation to warmer reaches, you came across a disturbingly large insect? Some might run the other way, but if you are like me, you’re asking “what the hell is that?” Project Noah brings together a community that can help. It’s been out for over a year, and Project Noah has already engaged thousands of users in the age-old game that has attracted the likes of Darwin and Teddy Roosevelt: discovering and identifying nature’s treasures.

The web app is accessible and well designed, and the experience is also available on iOS and Android for finding critters in the field. Gamification features engage users towards contributing regularly. There is not a leaderboard, but top photos of the day are featured and reward users for contributing (check out yesterdays winning photo of a whale shark from user JessyZich). The overall design of the website is excellent, drawing on many of the design philosophies of gamification and engagement.

Using clever but elegant design, University at Buffalo chemists have synthesized tiny, molecular cages that can be used to capture and purify nanomaterials.
“Sculpted from a special kind of molecule called a “bottle-brush molecule,” the traps consist of tiny, organic tubes whose interior walls carry a negative charge. This feature enables the tubes to selectively encapsulate only positively charged particles.”
via nanosize:

Using clever but elegant design, University at Buffalo chemists have synthesized tiny, molecular cages that can be used to capture and purify nanomaterials.

Sculpted from a special kind of molecule called a “bottle-brush molecule,” the traps consist of tiny, organic tubes whose interior walls carry a negative charge. This feature enables the tubes to selectively encapsulate only positively charged particles.”

via nanosize:

(via nanosize-deactivated20130114)

Caltech’s ePetri dish uses Android, not microscope | CNET News
What do you get when you combine an Android smartphone, cell phone image sensor, Lego building blocks, and a handful of Caltech engineers and biologists? The ePetri, which isn’t Petri Dish 2.0, but a full reworking of a technology that dates back to the late 1800s.

Caltech’s ePetri dish uses Android, not microscope | CNET News

What do you get when you combine an Android smartphone, cell phone image sensor, Lego building blocks, and a handful of Caltech engineers and biologists? The ePetri, which isn’t Petri Dish 2.0, but a full reworking of a technology that dates back to the late 1800s.


A startup called Liquid Robotics has a growing fleet of autonomous vehicles that rove the ocean collecting data from a variety of onboard sensors.
(via I’ve moved again : On a New Road)

via 2020:

A startup called Liquid Robotics has a growing fleet of autonomous vehicles that rove the ocean collecting data from a variety of onboard sensors.

(via I’ve moved again : On a New Road)

via 2020:


VIRTUAL LAB RATS TO ASSIST IN DISEASE STUDY

Despite all their rage, lab rats are still just rats in a cage, right? Well, not any more. Thanks to computational biologist, Daniel Beard, the cage door will be somewhat opened, as he and his team has found a new breed to study — virtual rats.
Full Story: Discovery News

via emergentfutures:

VIRTUAL LAB RATS TO ASSIST IN DISEASE STUDY


Despite all their rage, lab rats are still just rats in a cage, right? Well, not any more. Thanks to computational biologist, Daniel Beard, the cage door will be somewhat opened, as he and his team has found a new breed to study — virtual rats.

Full Story: Discovery News

via emergentfutures:


Kinect Hacked For 3-D Scanning Of Archaeology Site
University of California, San Diego students will be going to Jordan soon to take part in an archaeological dig that’s decidely futuristic: As they uncover artifacts and structures in the soil, they’ll be using high-quality 3-D scanning to record accurate positional details—rich data that could be incredibly useful in the future. Instead of using expensive and complex imaging systems like LIDAR, however, the team will use a hacked Microsoft Kinect to do the job for them.
Full Story: Fast Company

via emergentfutures:

Kinect Hacked For 3-D Scanning Of Archaeology Site

University of California, San Diego students will be going to Jordan soon to take part in an archaeological dig that’s decidely futuristic: As they uncover artifacts and structures in the soil, they’ll be using high-quality 3-D scanning to record accurate positional details—rich data that could be incredibly useful in the future. Instead of using expensive and complex imaging systems like LIDAR, however, the team will use a hacked Microsoft Kinect to do the job for them.

Full Story: Fast Company

via emergentfutures:

We think IBM Content Analytics will be a game changer in biomedical research and patient care. It will ultimately accelerate the pace of clinical and translational research through more rapid and accurate extraction of research relevant information from clinical documents

Quote by Dr. Rakesh Nagarajan, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University.  Quote appeared in "IBM Business Analytics Software Helps BJC Healthcare and Washington University Improve Healthcare Through Better Research"