Microchip Markets RFID Technology that Transmits via the Human Body - RFID Journal
Several companies are currently beta-testing a radio frequency identification system from Microchip Technology that uses the human body as a conduit for transmissions between an interrogator and a tag. Microchip’s platform, known as BodyCom, can be utilized to control access to a building, or to control the usage of a device, such as a computer or a weapon. The companies, located in various parts of the world, are testing ways in which to integrate the technology into their own solutions, such as keyless vehicle-entry systems.
While traditional RFID systems transmit data through the air, simply requiring a tag or a receiving unit to come within transmission range of an interrogator, the BodyCom solution requires that both tag and interrogator be within close proximity to a person’s body. By leveraging the body to transmit a signal, BodyCom does not need as much power, nor does it require a conventional RFID reader antenna, according to Edward Dias, the embedded-security business-development manager of Microchip’s MCU8 (8-bit microcontroller) division. This would mean the battery life of a device such as a remote control or an ID tag would be longer, he explains, and that the transmission itself would be more secure, since there would be no over-the-air RF signals that could be intercepted.

 Microchip Markets RFID Technology that Transmits via the Human Body - RFID Journal

Several companies are currently beta-testing a radio frequency identification system from Microchip Technology that uses the human body as a conduit for transmissions between an interrogator and a tag. Microchip’s platform, known as BodyCom, can be utilized to control access to a building, or to control the usage of a device, such as a computer or a weapon. The companies, located in various parts of the world, are testing ways in which to integrate the technology into their own solutions, such as keyless vehicle-entry systems.

While traditional RFID systems transmit data through the air, simply requiring a tag or a receiving unit to come within transmission range of an interrogator, the BodyCom solution requires that both tag and interrogator be within close proximity to a person’s body. By leveraging the body to transmit a signal, BodyCom does not need as much power, nor does it require a conventional RFID reader antenna, according to Edward Dias, the embedded-security business-development manager of Microchip’s MCU8 (8-bit microcontroller) division. This would mean the battery life of a device such as a remote control or an ID tag would be longer, he explains, and that the transmission itself would be more secure, since there would be no over-the-air RF signals that could be intercepted.

Michelin Uses RFID to Track Tire Pressure and Tread for London Bus Company - RFID Journal
The tires on Stagecoach London’s double-decker buses are equipped with passive EPC RFID tags and wireless air-pressure sensors that record a tire’s pressure and tread depth within a matter of seconds.

Michelin Uses RFID to Track Tire Pressure and Tread for London Bus Company - RFID Journal

The tires on Stagecoach London’s double-decker buses are equipped with passive EPC RFID tags and wireless air-pressure sensors that record a tire’s pressure and tread depth within a matter of seconds.

Scientists Print Cheap RFID Tags On Paper | TechWeekEurope UK
Technology could make RFID tags cheap enough to replace barcodes in the future
A way to print Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chips right onto paper has been discovered by a team of scientists from University of Montpellier.
The  technique uses a thermal evaporation process to deposit of thin  aluminium coil antennas on sheets of paper which can later be used to  create packaging or printed material. Researchers claim that this works  out to be cheaper than any other method of  producing RFID tags,  allowing the technology to replace both barcodes and QR codes.

Scientists Print Cheap RFID Tags On Paper | TechWeekEurope UK

Technology could make RFID tags cheap enough to replace barcodes in the future

A way to print Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chips right onto paper has been discovered by a team of scientists from University of Montpellier.

The technique uses a thermal evaporation process to deposit of thin aluminium coil antennas on sheets of paper which can later be used to create packaging or printed material. Researchers claim that this works out to be cheaper than any other method of  producing RFID tags, allowing the technology to replace both barcodes and QR codes.

When predicting technology trends, Bill Buxton, Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research and author of Sketching User Experiences may have said it best:

“If history is any indication, we should assume that any technology that is going to have a significant impact over the next 10 years is already 10 years old!”

This theory holds true for several technologies. For example, the first mobile telephone call was made in 1946, many years before the first commercial cellular network was launched in 1979. GPS was in use for nearly 30 years in government and military programs before it became a must have for personal vehicle navigation. And, the formation of the Internet as we know it began in the 1980s, but wasn’t truly incorporated into virtually every aspect of modern human life until a decade later.

Applying this premise to radio frequency identification (RFID) seems to hold true as well. The technology itself was well over 10 years old in 2004 when retail giants began pushing it as a means of driving efficiencies into their supply chains. While these initial retail programs didn’t succeed according to plan, and mass adoption didn’t happen the way many analysts predicted, these initiatives did kick off a high level of interest from retailers, product manufacturers and many other industries and markets focused on improving their business and service processes. Between 2004 and now, something else happened that makes one ask if RFID is ready to have that significant impact Buxton mentions.

South Korea’s Live Park uses RFID and Kinect to bring your Holodeck fantasies one step nearer | Engadget
. Located near Seoul, Live Park uses  3D video, holograms and augmented reality, interacting with RFID wrist  bands and Kinect sensors to stitch together a continuous immersive  story. You (and your avatar!) have 65 attractions, over seven themed  zones, and the world’s biggest interactive 360 degree stereoscopic theater to wave, jump and shout your way through. Two years and $13  million in the making, Live Park’s creator d’strict is now looking to  license the concept out internationally, with locations in China and  Singapore already earmarked.

South Korea’s Live Park uses RFID and Kinect to bring your Holodeck fantasies one step nearer | Engadget

. Located near Seoul, Live Park uses 3D video, holograms and augmented reality, interacting with RFID wrist bands and Kinect sensors to stitch together a continuous immersive story. You (and your avatar!) have 65 attractions, over seven themed zones, and the world’s biggest interactive 360 degree stereoscopic theater to wave, jump and shout your way through. Two years and $13 million in the making, Live Park’s creator d’strict is now looking to license the concept out internationally, with locations in China and Singapore already earmarked.

RF-enabled app locates lost objects or children

We’ve recently seen RFID technology used to help farmers track cows and locate children. Now, recently launched Bikn enables consumers to find lost objects, pets or children with a system consisting of an RF-enabled iPhone case, multiple tags and an app. READ MORE…

via springwise:

RF-enabled app locates lost objects or children

We’ve recently seen RFID technology used to help farmers track cows and locate children. Now, recently launched Bikn enables consumers to find lost objects, pets or children with a system consisting of an RF-enabled iPhone case, multiple tags and an app. READ MORE…

via springwise:

(via thenextweb)

4 Cities Using Tech to Alleviate Traffic | Mashable
There are one billion cars on the road, and that number could reach 2.5 billion by 2020. That auto congestion not only wreaks havoc on the environment, but also frustrates the commuters sitting in traffic on their way to work. The IBM Commuter Pain Index compiled traffic angst data by city and found that 87% of people had been stuck in traffic in the past three years, and 31% said the traffic was so bad that they turned around and went home. Clearly, traffic is a major issue when it comes to metropolitan living and urban mobility, but help is on the way.  

4 Cities Using Tech to Alleviate Traffic | Mashable

There are one billion cars on the road, and that number could reach 2.5 billion by 2020. That auto congestion not only wreaks havoc on the environment, but also frustrates the commuters sitting in traffic on their way to work. The IBM Commuter Pain Index compiled traffic angst data by city and found that 87% of people had been stuck in traffic in the past three years, and 31% said the traffic was so bad that they turned around and went home. Clearly, traffic is a major issue when it comes to metropolitan living and urban mobility, but help is on the way.  


I’ve always been a big fan of the Internet of Things, especially after Kevin Kelly’s TED lecture a few years back. After seeing this nice infographic done by Intel, I can only acknowledge we’re still in a very early stage of this idea.
Most types of devices you see (check the top right corner) are display devices, meaning they’ll present online content on a display, either “raw” as in a browser, or translated to an application like a game or a navigation system.
The real power of the Internet of Things will come when less obvious objects are connected to the internet. For example shoes, fridges, coffee machines, wardrobes, tooth brushes, doors, light switches… I’m sure there are shoes that go online already (Nike+ for example), coffee machines that make coffee based on the weather found online, tooth brushes that share your amount of turns and light switches that you can switch on and off from your smartphone. Yet these are hardly mainstream nor have they unveiled the true potential of the Internet Of Things.
If you think about all new technologies that are coming up in the coming months: 4G networks, RFID or NFC particularly, better face, object and voice recognition, … Combining that with faster processors, high resolution displays, longer battery life, … And putting that all into more objects we use every day, I think you can agree we’ve got some very exciting times ahead of us! The Internet of Things has only just started…

castemelijn:

I’ve always been a big fan of the Internet of Things, especially after Kevin Kelly’s TED lecture a few years back. After seeing this nice infographic done by Intel, I can only acknowledge we’re still in a very early stage of this idea.

Most types of devices you see (check the top right corner) are display devices, meaning they’ll present online content on a display, either “raw” as in a browser, or translated to an application like a game or a navigation system.

The real power of the Internet of Things will come when less obvious objects are connected to the internet. For example shoes, fridges, coffee machines, wardrobes, tooth brushes, doors, light switches… I’m sure there are shoes that go online already (Nike+ for example), coffee machines that make coffee based on the weather found online, tooth brushes that share your amount of turns and light switches that you can switch on and off from your smartphone. Yet these are hardly mainstream nor have they unveiled the true potential of the Internet Of Things.

If you think about all new technologies that are coming up in the coming months: 4G networks, RFID or NFC particularly, better face, object and voice recognition, … Combining that with faster processors, high resolution displays, longer battery life, … And putting that all into more objects we use every day, I think you can agree we’ve got some very exciting times ahead of us! The Internet of Things has only just started…

castemelijn:

SmartHat Developers Hope to Make Construction Sites Safer - RFID Journal
Researchers at Georgia Tech and Duke University have developed  and tested an energy-harvesting EPC Gen 2 RFID tag and reader designed  to alert workers and equipment operators in the event of an imminent  collision.
A team of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology’s Real-time Automated Project Information and Decision Systems (RAPIDS) laboratory and Duke University have completed testing of an energy-harvesting radio frequency identification system that, when tags are attached to hard hats, can issue an alert in  the event that heavy equipment is moving too close to a worker on a  construction site. The solution is unique, in that the tag can operate  from power stored on a built-in capacitor,  enabling the tag to be smaller than it would have been if it had a  battery, while also ensuring that the system does not fail due to  batteries requiring replacement.

SmartHat Developers Hope to Make Construction Sites Safer - RFID Journal

Researchers at Georgia Tech and Duke University have developed and tested an energy-harvesting EPC Gen 2 RFID tag and reader designed to alert workers and equipment operators in the event of an imminent collision.

A team of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology’s Real-time Automated Project Information and Decision Systems (RAPIDS) laboratory and Duke University have completed testing of an energy-harvesting radio frequency identification system that, when tags are attached to hard hats, can issue an alert in the event that heavy equipment is moving too close to a worker on a construction site. The solution is unique, in that the tag can operate from power stored on a built-in capacitor, enabling the tag to be smaller than it would have been if it had a battery, while also ensuring that the system does not fail due to batteries requiring replacement.

Beverage Metrics developed a patented collar sensor that fits securely over the neck of liquor and wine bottles. The collar contains an RFID tag, a tilt sensor, an accelerometer, and a temperature sensor. When a drink is poured, the sensor gathers data, including beverage type, time poured, and volume poured, and sends that data wirelessly to readers installed in the bar or on touchscreen tablets on banquet carts. The software then utilizes a proprietary algorithm to determine and record the exact amount of alcohol being poured, and makes the data instantly available in InSync’s application.

L.L. Bean Tries to Hike Sales With RFID
Source: RFID Journal
Apparel and outdoors sports equipment retailerL.L. Bean is testing a radio frequency identification system that records when an item is picked up by a customer at its flagship store, and activates the streaming of appropriate video regarding that particular product. The system, known as InMotion Retail Marketing, was provided by brand identification technologies firmPittsfield ID Technologies. 

L.L. Bean Tries to Hike Sales With RFID

Source: RFID Journal

Apparel and outdoors sports equipment retailerL.L. Bean is testing a radio frequency identification system that records when an item is picked up by a customer at its flagship store, and activates the streaming of appropriate video regarding that particular product. The system, known as InMotion Retail Marketing, was provided by brand identification technologies firmPittsfield ID Technologies

RFID in the Consumer Electronics Sector | RFID Journal

Now that apparel companies have paved the way, the electronics industry could be next to adopt RFID at the item level.

Managing complex inventories: The single biggest benefit apparel companies can achieve from using RFID at the item level is being able to manage complex inventories. It’s difficult to make sure the right number of stone-washed denim jeans—which come in several styles and 20 different sizes—are shipped to the warehouse, picked, shipped to the store and put on the shelf when they need to be replenished. Similarly, managing inventories of 20 types of Dell laptops—with different processors, hard drives, video cards and RAM—is a challenge. Looking at boxes in the back room doesn’t immediately tell you which specific configurations are missing. 

Out-of-stocks: Unlike apparel retailers, electronics retailers do not usually stock a lot of goods on shelves—rather, most display samples and keep stock in the back room to reduce theft. But they do have some out-of-stock issues. Just as apparel-store employees can’t look at a wall unit filled with jeans and know which particular styles and sizes are missing, electronic store associates can not view a rack of music CDs or movie DVDs, or a shelf of toner cartridges, and know which items are missing. When customers enter a store seeking a specific item and fail to find it, the result is often a lost sale. 

Seasonality: Related to out-of-stocks and managing complex inventory is the issue of seasonality. Consumer electronics, like clothing, have a limited shelf life. Order too many of the new iPod introduced for the holiday season, for example, and you’ll wind up with excess inventory that then has to be sold at a steep discount, or written off entirely. Order too few of the hottest electronics products, on the other hand, and you’ll miss out on sales. RFID can help manage inventory more efficiently, so that companies can better match supply to demand. For example, knowing exactly what you have on the shelves, in the back of the store and in the warehouse means you can reduce safety stocks, thereby decreasing the likelihood of being caught with overstocks. 

(Read the rest on RFIDJournal.com)