trendd:

I am a huge fan of Automatic and I’m confident that this feature will be in all cars soon. I would love to see Apple buy this company to compliment it’s CarPlay efforts, but I wouldn’t be surprised if Google buys them first.
"The Crash Alert feature, which is currently in beta, is arriving on both iOS and Android for testing purposes. The idea is to offer the conveniences that an integrated system like OnStar would provide in terms of emergency assistance, but bundled into a mobile application instead. With Crash Alert enabled, Automatic will be able to detect if you’ve been in a serious crash and will notify the local authorities with your location even if you can’t.
In addition, someone from Automatic will also reach out to your family and other loved ones on your behalf to let them know what has happened, and that emergency responders are on their way.”
(via Smart Driving Assistant Comes To Android With Safety-Focused “Do Not Disturb” And Crash Alert Features | TechCrunch)

trendd:

I am a huge fan of Automatic and I’m confident that this feature will be in all cars soon. I would love to see Apple buy this company to compliment it’s CarPlay efforts, but I wouldn’t be surprised if Google buys them first.

"The Crash Alert feature, which is currently in beta, is arriving on both iOS and Android for testing purposes. The idea is to offer the conveniences that an integrated system like OnStar would provide in terms of emergency assistance, but bundled into a mobile application instead. With Crash Alert enabled, Automatic will be able to detect if you’ve been in a serious crash and will notify the local authorities with your location even if you can’t.

In addition, someone from Automatic will also reach out to your family and other loved ones on your behalf to let them know what has happened, and that emergency responders are on their way.”

(via Smart Driving Assistant Comes To Android With Safety-Focused “Do Not Disturb” And Crash Alert Features | TechCrunch)

How prepared are American cities for increased natural disasters? Over the years, Americans have insisted on expanding and building cities and suburbs in locations that are clearly threatened by natural hazards. This week’s monster tornado in Oklahoma demonstrates this. Cities and states have encouraged people to live in these areas through city planning, architectural design, and the so-called need for “economic development.”
Thus, instead of encouraging people to not live in these hazard zones, city leaders have created methods to help people survive relatively normal lives there. Houses in California must meet specific earthquake design standards, buildings in Oklahoma have “safe rooms,” and countless structures must be stable enough to handle floods and erosion along American coastlines. These are adaptations. Not good adaptations (I believe people should not be encouraged to live in these areas), but there it is.
With the climate changing, the impacts on communities are likely to increase. Incidences of natural disasters are expected to rise, costing many lives and causing a need for an endless stream of disaster aid.
Researchers at MIT teamed up with the non-profit ICLEI to survey cities around the world. The goal was to compare how they were adapting to climate change impacts, or preparing for future impacts. Progress, the researchers found, is very slow in the US, while cities around the world are far more advanced. 
It’s a great read, very visual so if you don’t have time you can skim it.
Survey: U.S. Cities Report Increase in Climate Change Impacts, Lag Global Cities in Planning

How prepared are American cities for increased natural disasters? Over the years, Americans have insisted on expanding and building cities and suburbs in locations that are clearly threatened by natural hazards. This week’s monster tornado in Oklahoma demonstrates this. Cities and states have encouraged people to live in these areas through city planning, architectural design, and the so-called need for “economic development.”

Thus, instead of encouraging people to not live in these hazard zones, city leaders have created methods to help people survive relatively normal lives there. Houses in California must meet specific earthquake design standards, buildings in Oklahoma have “safe rooms,” and countless structures must be stable enough to handle floods and erosion along American coastlines. These are adaptations. Not good adaptations (I believe people should not be encouraged to live in these areas), but there it is.

With the climate changing, the impacts on communities are likely to increase. Incidences of natural disasters are expected to rise, costing many lives and causing a need for an endless stream of disaster aid.

Researchers at MIT teamed up with the non-profit ICLEI to survey cities around the world. The goal was to compare how they were adapting to climate change impacts, or preparing for future impacts. Progress, the researchers found, is very slow in the US, while cities around the world are far more advanced. 

It’s a great read, very visual so if you don’t have time you can skim it.

Survey: U.S. Cities Report Increase in Climate Change Impacts, Lag Global Cities in Planning

(via urbnist)

Here are the hard facts. Climate change made Typhoon Haiyan the dangerous storm it was, and it is absolutely urgent that our leaders connect the dots to prevent worse in the future @ 350.org
Typhoon Haiyan influenced by climate change, scientists say @ Sydney Morning Herald
Is climate change to blame for Typhoon Haiyan? The Philippines has been hit by 24 typhoons in the past year but the power of Haiyan was off the scale, killing thousands and leaving millions homeless. Is there even worse devastation to come? @ Guardian

Here are the hard facts. Climate change made Typhoon Haiyan the dangerous storm it was, and it is absolutely urgent that our leaders connect the dots to prevent worse in the future @ 350.org

Typhoon Haiyan influenced by climate change, scientists say @ Sydney Morning Herald

Is climate change to blame for Typhoon Haiyan? The Philippines has been hit by 24 typhoons in the past year but the power of Haiyan was off the scale, killing thousands and leaving millions homeless. Is there even worse devastation to come? @ Guardian

Australian firefighters test data-transmitting pills to monitor biometrics during work
A new swallowable pill has been trialled with 50 firefighters in Australia, aimed at monitoring body temperatures and other vital readings when working under extreme conditions. Using Equivital’s VitalSense Core Temperature capsules, they transmit readings to the companion EQ02 LifeMonitor, housed on the chest. This then sends data on skin temperature, heart rate and respiration rate to an external computer. If a firefighter’s core body temperature is increasing too quickly, they can then be moved from the frontline to a recovery area, hopefully reducing accidents and deaths caused by heat exhaustion.

Australian firefighters test data-transmitting pills to monitor biometrics during work

A new swallowable pill has been trialled with 50 firefighters in Australia, aimed at monitoring body temperatures and other vital readings when working under extreme conditions. Using Equivital’s VitalSense Core Temperature capsules, they transmit readings to the companion EQ02 LifeMonitor, housed on the chest. This then sends data on skin temperature, heart rate and respiration rate to an external computer. If a firefighter’s core body temperature is increasing too quickly, they can then be moved from the frontline to a recovery area, hopefully reducing accidents and deaths caused by heat exhaustion.

Extreme weather poses a growing risk to the stability of insurance companies and has broad ramifications for the economy and society. Our new report shows what insurers, regulators and investors can do to address climate change risks. To learn more and to download the report, follow the link below! @ Ceres

Extreme weather poses a growing risk to the stability of insurance companies and has broad ramifications for the economy and society. Our new report shows what insurers, regulators and investors can do to address climate change risks. To learn more and to download the report, follow the link below! @ Ceres

Deep Thunder: Preparing for extreme weather events with modeling technology (by IBMSocialMedia)

IBM’s high resolution weather forecasting and modeling technology - called Deep Thunder - provides a predictive capability to map approaching weather events, and model the anticipated impact. The system applies mathematical algorithms to understand the interaction of the atmosphere with the surface of the earth. Detailed risk assessments are developed using data from soil saturation levels, rates and flow of water run off, the region’s topography, as well as historical rainfall and flood records. Using historical data, sophisticated analytics software and ever more powerful supercomputers, cities can get extremely accurate and detailed weather forecasts for very specific locations — such as a two-block radius — up to 48 hours in advance.

With the predictive information, emergency response teams are able to be deployed close to where problems are likely to occur. This technology can provide longer advance notice of adverse weather conditions, allowing more time for disaster prevention. Rather than monitor a storm, we can stage resources at the right place and time prior to an event to minimize the impact and save lives.

IBM is running in partnership with police departments across the nation, crunching massive amounts of public information to try to predict where and when crimes will occur. The project, known as CRUSH — Criminal Reduction Utilizing Statistical History — has proven very effective in pilot programs in several American cities, including Memphis, Tennessee, where it been credited with reducing serious crimes by 30 percent and violent crimes by 15 percent

emergentfutures:

No More Car Crashes by 2020?
The leading cause of car accidents is pretty obvious – its human error. Whether its drunk driving, distracted driving, or aggressive driving, it all comes back to the person behind the wheel. Less than 20% of accidents are caused by road or mechanical failure, so the only way to truly make driving safer for everyone is to give the person behind the wheel more tools to drive safely – or even remove the human element altogether.
Here are five things that can put us on a path to ZERO human error car crashes by 2020:
Full Story: Innovaro

emergentfutures:

No More Car Crashes by 2020?

The leading cause of car accidents is pretty obvious – its human error. Whether its drunk driving, distracted driving, or aggressive driving, it all comes back to the person behind the wheel. Less than 20% of accidents are caused by road or mechanical failure, so the only way to truly make driving safer for everyone is to give the person behind the wheel more tools to drive safely – or even remove the human element altogether.

Here are five things that can put us on a path to ZERO human error car crashes by 2020:

Full Story: Innovaro

The smell of freshly cut grass may stir memories of baseball parks, cookouts or lazy summer afternoons in the suburbs, but what we perceive as a sweet aroma is actually the plant equivalent of a distress call, one that the grass releases to signal that the lawn is under attack.