Muse: Changing The Way The World Thinks

Muse, InteraXon’s new brainwave-sensing headband, allows you to do more with your mind then ever thought possible. Visit our IndieGoGo crowdfunding campaign page for more details at indiegogo.com/interaxonmuse

The Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society — CITRISwww.citris-uc.org, works on a variety of Smarter Planet-related fronts including “smart dust” networks of tiny wireless sensors, intelligent infrastructure, energy and the environment, and technology for emerging economies (via citrisuc)

Clip-on sensor monitors infants for trouble - The Boston Globe
The Snuza Halo (www.snuza.com) is among the latest gadgets that use sensors to monitor a baby’s crib for signs of trouble. The Halo, designed in South Africa, is unusual: rather than clipping the device to a crib or mattress, you attach it to the baby’s diaper. The Halo senses the slightest movements. If it does not detect movement for 15 seconds - a sign the baby might not be breathing - the device vibrates the baby’s abdomen. If after a few seconds the vibration doesn’t appear to restart movement, the Halo sounds an alarm.

Clip-on sensor monitors infants for trouble - The Boston Globe

The Snuza Halo (www.snuza.com) is among the latest gadgets that use sensors to monitor a baby’s crib for signs of trouble. The Halo, designed in South Africa, is unusual: rather than clipping the device to a crib or mattress, you attach it to the baby’s diaper. The Halo senses the slightest movements. If it does not detect movement for 15 seconds - a sign the baby might not be breathing - the device vibrates the baby’s abdomen. If after a few seconds the vibration doesn’t appear to restart movement, the Halo sounds an alarm.

Scientists at Draper Laboratory, in Cambridge, MA, are developing a nanosensor that could be injected into the skin, much like tattoo dye, to monitor an individual’s blood-sugar level. As the glucose level increases, the “tattoo” would fluoresce under an infrared light, telling a diabetic whether or not she needs an insulin shot following a meal. (via Technology Review: The Glucose-Monitoring Tattoo)

Scientists at Draper Laboratory, in Cambridge, MA, are developing a nanosensor that could be injected into the skin, much like tattoo dye, to monitor an individual’s blood-sugar level. As the glucose level increases, the “tattoo” would fluoresce under an infrared light, telling a diabetic whether or not she needs an insulin shot following a meal. (via Technology Review: The Glucose-Monitoring Tattoo)

CAP (Compact Application Protocol) is Arch Rock’s proposal to run ZigBee Application Profiles such as Smart Energy and Home Automation over a standard Internet Protocol (IP) stack. CAP brings the benefits of the ZigBee Application Profiles to a whole new set of devices on diverse networks, including Ethernet, Wi-Fi, and HomePlug, while preserving the resource efficiency and compactness crucial to devices running on IEEE 802.15.4 low-power radio.Arch Rock  >IP + ZigBee = CAP

CAP (Compact Application Protocol) is Arch Rock’s proposal to run ZigBee Application Profiles such as Smart Energy and Home Automation over a standard Internet Protocol (IP) stack. CAP brings the benefits of the ZigBee Application Profiles to a whole new set of devices on diverse networks, including Ethernet, Wi-Fi, and HomePlug, while preserving the resource efficiency and compactness crucial to devices running on IEEE 802.15.4 low-power radio.
Arch Rock >IP + ZigBee = CAP

University of Michigan (U-M) researchers have developed an ultra low power microchip which ‘uses 30,000 times less power in sleep mode and 10 times less in active mode than comparable chips now on the market.’ It only consumes 30 picowatts in sleep mode, which means that a simple watch battery could power the chip for more than 200 years. Of course, this is not a processor for your next computer. It is designed for sensor-based devices such as medical implants, environment monitors or surveillance equipment. (via 
		A 30-picowatt processor for sensors | ZDNet.com)

University of Michigan (U-M) researchers have developed an ultra low power microchip which ‘uses 30,000 times less power in sleep mode and 10 times less in active mode than comparable chips now on the market.’ It only consumes 30 picowatts in sleep mode, which means that a simple watch battery could power the chip for more than 200 years. Of course, this is not a processor for your next computer. It is designed for sensor-based devices such as medical implants, environment monitors or surveillance equipment. (via
A 30-picowatt processor for sensors | ZDNet.com
)

A peculiar quantum-physics property called entanglement can be harnessed to make detectors—similar in principle to radar systems used to track airplanes in flight or ships at sea—that are as much as a million times more efficient than existing systems. (via Next Big Future: Quantum entanglement enhanced radar, CT Scans, X-rays could get same image with one million times lower power)

A peculiar quantum-physics property called entanglement can be harnessed to make detectors—similar in principle to radar systems used to track airplanes in flight or ships at sea—that are as much as a million times more efficient than existing systems. (via Next Big Future: Quantum entanglement enhanced radar, CT Scans, X-rays could get same image with one million times lower power)