DARPA’s Virtual Robotics Challenge

From June 17-21, 2013, teams in DARPA’s Virtual Robotics Challenge tested software designs to control a simulated ATLAS robot in a three-dimensional, virtual environment through a series of tasks modeled on what activities might be required in a real disaster response situation. The test environment, the DARPA Simulator, was developed for DARPA by the Open Source Robotics Foundation. The Simulator monitors and displays the physical and sensory behaviors of robots in real time. Data communication between the virtual robot and the teams was varied to reflect degraded communications in an actual disaster zone. Twenty-six teams from eight countries qualified to compete, and up to six winning teams will receive funding and an ATLAS robot from DARPA to compete in the DARPA Robotics Challenge Trials in December 2013.

The Simulator uses physics-based models of inertia, actuation, contact and environment dynamics to simulate a robot’s motion through an environment. Following the DARPA Robotics Challenge, DARPA intends for the Simulator to be a legacy tool for the robotics community, available for broad use to support invention of robot applications.

[via & read more @popsci] [The Robotics Challenge]

Inside The Largest Simulation Of The Universe Ever Created | Popular Science
Simulating Matter Distribution Across The Cosmos  Joe Insley and the HACC team, Argonne National Laboratory.
Sometime next month, the world’s third-fastest supercomputer —known as Mira—will complete tests of its new upgraded software and begin running the largest cosmological simulations ever performed at Argonne National Laboratory. These simulations are massive, taking in huge amounts of data from the latest generation of high-fidelity sky surveys and crunching it into models of the universe that are larger, higher-resolution, and more statistically accurate than any that have come before. When it’s done, scientists should have some amazing high-quality visualizations of the so-called “cosmic web” that connects the universe as we understand it. And they’ll have the best statistical models of the cosmos that cosmologists have ever seen.

Inside The Largest Simulation Of The Universe Ever Created | Popular Science

Simulating Matter Distribution Across The Cosmos Joe Insley and the HACC team, Argonne National Laboratory.


Sometime next month, the world’s third-fastest supercomputer —known as Mira—will complete tests of its new upgraded software and begin running the largest cosmological simulations ever performed at Argonne National Laboratory. These simulations are massive, taking in huge amounts of data from the latest generation of high-fidelity sky surveys and crunching it into models of the universe that are larger, higher-resolution, and more statistically accurate than any that have come before. When it’s done, scientists should have some amazing high-quality visualizations of the so-called “cosmic web” that connects the universe as we understand it. And they’ll have the best statistical models of the cosmos that cosmologists have ever seen.

DARPA and NIH to fund ‘human body on a chip’ research | KurzweilAI
MIT-led team to receive up to $32 million from DARPA and NIH to develop technology that could accelerate pace and efficiency of pharmaceutical testing 
Researchers in the Department of Biological Engineering at MIT plan to develop a technology platform that will mimic human physiological systems in the laboratory, using an array of integrated, interchangeable engineered human tissue constructs, with $32 million funding over the next five years from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
A cooperative agreement between MIT and DARPA worth up to $26.3 million will be used to establish a new program titled “Barrier-Immune-Organ: MIcrophysiology, Microenvironment Engineered TIssue Construct Systems” (BIO-MIMETICS) at MIT, in collaboration with researchers at the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, MatTek Corp. and Zyoxel Ltd.

DARPA and NIH to fund ‘human body on a chip’ research | KurzweilAI

MIT-led team to receive up to $32 million from DARPA and NIH to develop technology that could accelerate pace and efficiency of pharmaceutical testing 

Researchers in the Department of Biological Engineering at MIT plan to develop a technology platform that will mimic human physiological systems in the laboratory, using an array of integrated, interchangeable engineered human tissue constructs, with $32 million funding over the next five years from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

A cooperative agreement between MIT and DARPA worth up to $26.3 million will be used to establish a new program titled “Barrier-Immune-Organ: MIcrophysiology, Microenvironment Engineered TIssue Construct Systems” (BIO-MIMETICS) at MIT, in collaboration with researchers at the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, MatTek Corp. and Zyoxel Ltd.

 Low-power chips to model a billion neurons | KurzweilAI
A miniature, massively parallel computer, powered by a million ARM processors, could produce the best brain simulations yet, Steve Furber suggests in IEEE Spectrum.
With traditional digital circuits, that would require a supercomputer that’s 1000 times as powerful as the best ones we have available today. And we’d need the output of an entire nuclear power plant to run it.
Fortunately, there are at least half a dozen projects dedicated to building brain models using specialized analog circuits that can model brain activity as fast as or even faster than it really occurs, and they consume a fraction of the power.

 Low-power chips to model a billion neurons | KurzweilAI

A miniature, massively parallel computer, powered by a million ARM processors, could produce the best brain simulations yet, Steve Furber suggests in IEEE Spectrum.

With traditional digital circuits, that would require a supercomputer that’s 1000 times as powerful as the best ones we have available today. And we’d need the output of an entire nuclear power plant to run it.

Fortunately, there are at least half a dozen projects dedicated to building brain models using specialized analog circuits that can model brain activity as fast as or even faster than it really occurs, and they consume a fraction of the power.

DEUS consortium – Dark Energy Universe Simulations | Dark matter & dark energy simulations
The goal of the DEUS project (Dark Energy Universe Simulation) is to investigate the imprints of dark energy on cosmic structure formation through high-performance numerical simulations

DEUS consortium – Dark Energy Universe Simulations | Dark matter & dark energy simulations

The goal of the DEUS project (Dark Energy Universe Simulation) is to investigate the imprints of dark energy on cosmic structure formation through high-performance numerical simulations

Predicting Disasters Of The Future: Economic Disaster, Water Shortages, And Cyber Attacks 
A new report asking experts what disasters they’re afraid of has enough in it to make you hide under the bed. Bad news for optimists: The experts think global catastrophe is more likely than ever.






via fastcompany:

Predicting Disasters Of The Future: Economic Disaster, Water Shortages, And Cyber Attacks 

A new report asking experts what disasters they’re afraid of has enough in it to make you hide under the bed. Bad news for optimists: The experts think global catastrophe is more likely than ever.

via fastcompany:

Largest-Ever Simulation of the Universe Revealed - Technology Review
The latest computer model of the cosmos involves 400 billion particles in a box about two thirds of the volume of the universe 
… Today, Juhan Kim at the Korea Institute for Advanced Study in Seoul,  and a few pals, show just how far this technique has come. These guys  have carried out the largest simulation of the universe ever undertaken,  consisting of 374 billion particles in a box some 10 gigaparsecs  across. That’s roughly equivalent to about two thirds the size of the  observable universe.
This took some 20 days of computing time on the Tachyonii  supercomputer in Korea, the 26th fastest in the world in the last set of  rankings.

Largest-Ever Simulation of the Universe Revealed - Technology Review

The latest computer model of the cosmos involves 400 billion particles in a box about two thirds of the volume of the universe

… Today, Juhan Kim at the Korea Institute for Advanced Study in Seoul, and a few pals, show just how far this technique has come. These guys have carried out the largest simulation of the universe ever undertaken, consisting of 374 billion particles in a box some 10 gigaparsecs across. That’s roughly equivalent to about two thirds the size of the observable universe.

This took some 20 days of computing time on the Tachyonii supercomputer in Korea, the 26th fastest in the world in the last set of rankings.

After spending their childhood playing online games, students at Choate Rosemary Hall will soon be able to live inside one. When the academic year begins next autumn, the tony Connecticut prep school will open the Kohler Environmental Center, a living-learning facility where teams of students will compete with one another to see who can live most energy efficiently. Think of it as a sort of SimCity meets Survivor: Wallingford.
via fastcompany:

After spending their childhood playing online games, students at Choate Rosemary Hall will soon be able to live inside one. When the academic year begins next autumn, the tony Connecticut prep school will open the Kohler Environmental Center, a living-learning facility where teams of students will compete with one another to see who can live most energy efficiently. Think of it as a sort of SimCity meets Survivor: Wallingford.

via fastcompany:

(via fastcompany)

3-D Japan Quake Animations May Help Visualize Temblors | VizWorld.com
Combing through the massive amounts of data regarding this year’s  massive 9.0 earthquake off the coast of Japan, researchers have found  mountains of useful information.  Visualizing it all usefully has proven  tricky, but some new techniques coming out of the University of Alaska  at Fairbanks show promise.

3-D Japan Quake Animations May Help Visualize Temblors | VizWorld.com

Combing through the massive amounts of data regarding this year’s massive 9.0 earthquake off the coast of Japan, researchers have found mountains of useful information.  Visualizing it all usefully has proven tricky, but some new techniques coming out of the University of Alaska at Fairbanks show promise.