In the Coming Age of the Connected Home, Your Phone Will Be a Magic Wand |  Wired.com
Your smartphone is going domestic. In the age of the connected home, your mobile devices are becoming the central command, the brains, if you will, of the entire smarthome experience.
It makes sense. Rather than remote controls with menus to memorize and knobs, dials and switches to manipulate, your smartphone or tablet becomes one remote to rule them all. You’ve always got it with you when you’re out and about, it’s never far from hand when you’re sitting on the couch and it’s dead-simple to use.
What we’re seeing started with the birth of the smartphone, when gadgetmakers realized smartphone integration could add tremendous value to consumers’ product experiences. It started with simple apps that transform your phone into a remote control for a DVR or set-top box, letting you use a touchscreen to navigate complex user interfaces. It grew with apps that tie into our home security systems and, more recently, our appliances. Remembering if the milk in your fridge is past its prime or whether you have recipes based on the things in your freezer was once the stuff of The Jetsons, but is increasingly commonplace today.

In the Coming Age of the Connected Home, Your Phone Will Be a Magic Wand |  Wired.com

Your smartphone is going domestic. In the age of the connected home, your mobile devices are becoming the central command, the brains, if you will, of the entire smarthome experience.

It makes sense. Rather than remote controls with menus to memorize and knobs, dials and switches to manipulate, your smartphone or tablet becomes one remote to rule them all. You’ve always got it with you when you’re out and about, it’s never far from hand when you’re sitting on the couch and it’s dead-simple to use.

What we’re seeing started with the birth of the smartphone, when gadgetmakers realized smartphone integration could add tremendous value to consumers’ product experiences. It started with simple apps that transform your phone into a remote control for a DVR or set-top box, letting you use a touchscreen to navigate complex user interfaces. It grew with apps that tie into our home security systems and, more recently, our appliances. Remembering if the milk in your fridge is past its prime or whether you have recipes based on the things in your freezer was once the stuff of The Jetsons, but is increasingly commonplace today.

Nest Is Just the Beginning of Smart Home Tech
Another mold-breaking feature that has proven a boon for the Nest team is accurate climate reporting month over month. Nest will actually collect heating and cooling analytics — which includes the time it takes to hear or cool a home, how much energy is being used, and the peak times for energy consumption — and send them to the user to track trends. He hopes that this feature becomes an important part of how we control the climate in our homes in the next few years.
"I think we’re just starting to scratch the surface into the things we can do with our data," Rogers says. "We can understand so much more about the ecosystem as a whole."
The learning, talking thermostat is bound to be noticed, meaning that consumers who adopt smart thermostats are also able to understand how their energy is working for them.

Nest Is Just the Beginning of Smart Home Tech

Another mold-breaking feature that has proven a boon for the Nest team is accurate climate reporting month over month. Nest will actually collect heating and cooling analytics — which includes the time it takes to hear or cool a home, how much energy is being used, and the peak times for energy consumption — and send them to the user to track trends. He hopes that this feature becomes an important part of how we control the climate in our homes in the next few years.

"I think we’re just starting to scratch the surface into the things we can do with our data," Rogers says. "We can understand so much more about the ecosystem as a whole."

The learning, talking thermostat is bound to be noticed, meaning that consumers who adopt smart thermostats are also able to understand how their energy is working for them.

New Touchscreen Thermostat for Smarter Homes | Environmental Leader
Lighting control manufacturer Lutron Electronics has expanded its line of temperature controls with the addition of a co-branded Honeywell touchscreen thermostat called TouchPRO (pictured). The thermostat communicates with Lutron systems that also control lights, shades and stand-by power from small appliances. The TouchPRO thermostat can be ordered starting September 12, with a suggested list price of $450. 

New Touchscreen Thermostat for Smarter Homes | Environmental Leader

Lighting control manufacturer Lutron Electronics has expanded its line of temperature controls with the addition of a co-branded Honeywell touchscreen thermostat called TouchPRO (pictured). The thermostat communicates with Lutron systems that also control lights, shades and stand-by power from small appliances. The TouchPRO thermostat can be ordered starting September 12, with a suggested list price of $450. 

Connected Home is Now a Reality — Thanks to Verizon (via verizon)

The home of the future is today. Imagine a unified control panel that can manage your home essentials like lights, thermostat, and video using multiple screens: your TV, computer, smart phone and tablet. Imagine no longer. Thanks to Verizon—you can have real-time, anytime, anywhere access to manage your home. 

People Power rides ‘Internet of things’ to smart grid | Green Tech - CNET News
The best path to energy-efficient electronics is connecting them to the Internet, according to People Power. The Silicon Valley-based company today launched a system that uses embedded networking chips and Internet software, called the Energy Services Platform, to monitor and control plugged-in devices for better efficiency. It says it’s working with some business partners and expects its products to be available in the first quarter of next year. 

People Power rides ‘Internet of things’ to smart grid | Green Tech - CNET News

The best path to energy-efficient electronics is connecting them to the Internet, according to People Power. The Silicon Valley-based company today launched a system that uses embedded networking chips and Internet software, called the Energy Services Platform, to monitor and control plugged-in devices for better efficiency. It says it’s working with some business partners and expects its products to be available in the first quarter of next year. 

The Wi-Fi Alliance and the HomePlug Powerline Alliance announced an agreement Tuesday to collaborate on applications that allow smart energy grids to interoperate with “connected” homes.

I have been testing three of these devices, the Power Monitor from Black & Decker Corp. (BDK), the very similar PowerCost Monitor from Blue Line Innovations Inc., and the more-sophisticated The Energy Detective 5000 from Energy Inc. In my tests, the Black & Decker model provided the most effortless electricity-tracking service. At $99.99, it is also the least expensive. The devices provide real-time data about how much power you’re using across the house in terms that are easy to comprehend: cost per hour and cost per month. Turn on the microwave and watch the cost jump from 10 cents to 25 cents an hour. Turn off some lights and see the cost drop a few cents.

Smart mobile can turn on heating

Fancy a cuppa? Call the kettle.

A system that could eventually control heating, home security cameras and draw curtains has been demonstrated by phone maker Nokia.

The Nokia Home Control Center is a wireless router which can interface with equipment around the home.

The Finnish firm has partnered with European energy company RWE to manage heating systems and is hoping other firms will sign up soon.

BBC News (Posted via blackberry 8830)