The Internet of Things: Coming to a network near you - Network World

Internet of Things

Network When people talk about the Internet of Things (IoT), the most common examples are smart cars, IP-addressable washing machines and Internet-connected nanny cams.

But IoT is coming to the enterprise as well, and IT execs should already be thinking about the ways that IoT will shake up the corporate network.

[DEFINED: What is the Internet of Things?]

SLIDESHOW: 25 of the weirdest things in the ‘Internet of Things’]

"Products and services which were previously outside their domain will increasingly be under their jurisdiction," says Daniel Castro, senior analyst with the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, a Washington-based research and educational institute.

So, what are these devices?

Castro says that companies increasingly will be operating in “smart buildings” with advanced HVAC systems that are connected to the rest of the corporate network.

Many utility companies will be deploying Web-connected smart meters at customers’ facilities to allow for remote monitoring.

Companies are tying their physical security to their network security, so that data from security cameras and authentication readers are coming under the purview of enterprise IT.

Retailers such as WalMart, Target and Best Buy already use RFID and other tracking technologies to manage supply chain logistics, says IDC’s Michael Fauscette. IoT is a natural next step.

Then there’s “operational technology,” where enterprise assets such as manufacturing equipment, fleet trucks, rail cars, even patient monitoring equipment in hospitals, become networked devices, says Hung LeHong, research vice president at Gartner.

In the energy industry, nearly 50 percent of personnel who operate smart grids are within a few years of retirement, says IBM scientist Ron Ambrosio. A Deep QA system could help manage knowledge transfer by digitizing and making technical knowledge more accessible and transferable.

In the energy industry, nearly 50 percent of personnel who operate smart grids are within a few years of retirement, says IBM scientist Ron Ambrosio. A Deep QA system could help manage knowledge transfer by digitizing and making technical knowledge more accessible and transferable.

The Internet Of Things: How Will We Trust A Word It Says? - Tech Europe - WSJ
But what are the security issues surrounding an internet of 50 billion devices, 48 billion of which are going to be cheap remote sensors of some kind? And what are the security implications? One of the key issues is data integrity. How do you trust the data your sensors are sending? In fact how do you even know it is a sensor that is sending data at all, and not a bot or piece of malware? Then there is the problem of encryption. When smart meters are installed across the grid you can be sure that they will have a high degree of encryption built into them—after all they are likely to be pretty expensive pieces of kit. You can be sure that authentication and encryption will be built in. But what about a cheap (less than €1) sensor that is, say, responsible for reporting whether a parking place is occupied, or one that reports on the tensions in a restraining cable. How much encryption will be built into a 10¢ chip? But if it sends its data unencrypted, and it doesn’t use proper authentication, then it really is a simple matter of jumping in and adding whatever data you want to that stream.  

The Internet Of Things: How Will We Trust A Word It Says? - Tech Europe - WSJ

But what are the security issues surrounding an internet of 50 billion devices, 48 billion of which are going to be cheap remote sensors of some kind? And what are the security implications? One of the key issues is data integrity. How do you trust the data your sensors are sending? In fact how do you even know it is a sensor that is sending data at all, and not a bot or piece of malware? Then there is the problem of encryption. When smart meters are installed across the grid you can be sure that they will have a high degree of encryption built into them—after all they are likely to be pretty expensive pieces of kit. You can be sure that authentication and encryption will be built in. But what about a cheap (less than €1) sensor that is, say, responsible for reporting whether a parking place is occupied, or one that reports on the tensions in a restraining cable. How much encryption will be built into a 10¢ chip? But if it sends its data unencrypted, and it doesn’t use proper authentication, then it really is a simple matter of jumping in and adding whatever data you want to that stream.  

The Wi-Fi Alliance and the HomePlug Powerline Alliance announced an agreement Tuesday to collaborate on applications that allow smart energy grids to interoperate with “connected” homes.

courtenaybird:

Visualizing Small Changes That Make a Big Difference | Microsoft Hohm Blog
“Today we announced the Hohm Score and the ability to easily check your energy consumption and compare it to others around the nation. Besides personal use of the Hohm Score, there are some great data sets that can be visualized. Below is a heat map of the United States and the average Hohm Score per state.”

courtenaybird:

Visualizing Small Changes That Make a Big Difference | Microsoft Hohm Blog

Today we announced the Hohm Score and the ability to easily check your energy consumption and compare it to others around the nation. Besides personal use of the Hohm Score, there are some great data sets that can be visualized. Below is a heat map of the United States and the average Hohm Score per state.”

Oncor Names Smart Meter Partners: IBM, Ecologic Analytics
Texas utility Oncor may have rolled out almost 250,000 smart meters to customers already, but it won’t be building out all that network infrastructure alone. On Wednesday morning, some of Oncor’s partners announced their participation in the smart meter installation (planned to reach 3.4 million by 2012), including computing giant IBM and software maker Ecologic Analytics.

Oncor Names Smart Meter Partners: IBM, Ecologic Analytics

Texas utility Oncor may have rolled out almost 250,000 smart meters to customers already, but it won’t be building out all that network infrastructure alone. On Wednesday morning, some of Oncor’s partners announced their participation in the smart meter installation (planned to reach 3.4 million by 2012), including computing giant IBM and software maker Ecologic Analytics.