Smart letterbox notifies users when they’ve got mail
When it comes to digital technology, its common to name platforms after the real-world things they aim to virtually replicate — online messages arrive in an inbox. But today’s digital inboxes have become something much more than their physical counterparts, offering greater functionality. Aiming to redress the balance, Mr. Postman is a solar-powered mailbox that offers notifications, package tracking and smart security features. READ MORE…

Smart letterbox notifies users when they’ve got mail

When it comes to digital technology, its common to name platforms after the real-world things they aim to virtually replicate — online messages arrive in an inbox. But today’s digital inboxes have become something much more than their physical counterparts, offering greater functionality. Aiming to redress the balance, Mr. Postman is a solar-powered mailbox that offers notifications, package tracking and smart security features. READ MORE…

 AT&T to launch Digital Life in 15 markets, hopes to enter home automation field
AT&T is finally set to launch its Digital Life home automation service, and it’s ready to do so in a big way. Initially planned for just eight markets, the telephony giant has expanded its coverage to 15 starting this spring, with the hope of 50 by the end of the year. Essentially a way to monitor your home, Digital Life packages may include live video, the ability to remotely toggle the light on and off, change the thermostat, unlock the door and more. Customers are able to set up programs and alerts via smartphone or tablet applications or the web. AT&T should bring some heavy clout to the home automation party, though it won’t be the first big-name communications company to do so. For more information on Digital Life and what it offers, have a peek at the source below.

 AT&T to launch Digital Life in 15 markets, hopes to enter home automation field

AT&T is finally set to launch its Digital Life home automation service, and it’s ready to do so in a big way. Initially planned for just eight markets, the telephony giant has expanded its coverage to 15 starting this spring, with the hope of 50 by the end of the year. Essentially a way to monitor your home, Digital Life packages may include live video, the ability to remotely toggle the light on and off, change the thermostat, unlock the door and more. Customers are able to set up programs and alerts via smartphone or tablet applications or the web. AT&T should bring some heavy clout to the home automation party, though it won’t be the first big-name communications company to do so. For more information on Digital Life and what it offers, have a peek at the source below.

Belkin WeMo Switch and Motion
Home automation and smartphones are a natural fit. As such, we’re seeing the proliferation of systems that let you turn lights on and off, brew coffee, monitor security cameras and control other things around the home from anywhere, just by tapping on your phone’s screen.
The WeMo Switch + Motion is a $100 kit from Belkin that acts as a simple home automation system. Plug the self-contained unit into an electrical outlet, connect a light or an appliance, then pair the WeMo your smartphone over Wi-Fi. Once everything’s hooked up, you gain the ability to switch lights (or whatever) on and off without leaving the comfort of your bed. Activating the included motion sensor will give you a truly automated setup, but if all you need is the Switch, it’s available on its own for $40.

Belkin WeMo Switch and Motion

Home automation and smartphones are a natural fit. As such, we’re seeing the proliferation of systems that let you turn lights on and off, brew coffee, monitor security cameras and control other things around the home from anywhere, just by tapping on your phone’s screen.

The WeMo Switch + Motion is a $100 kit from Belkin that acts as a simple home automation system. Plug the self-contained unit into an electrical outlet, connect a light or an appliance, then pair the WeMo your smartphone over Wi-Fi. Once everything’s hooked up, you gain the ability to switch lights (or whatever) on and off without leaving the comfort of your bed. Activating the included motion sensor will give you a truly automated setup, but if all you need is the Switch, it’s available on its own for $40.

The Internet of Things, Taking On a Life Of Its Own
As this article is being published, European politicians and heavyweight representatives of some of the biggest companies in the world have been convening in Brussels, Belgium to discuss the Internet of Things. The event, The 4th Annual Internet of Things Europe: Shaping Europe’s Future Internet Policy - The road to Horizon 2020 was expected to be a significant one, attracting more senior participants than ever this year, such is the growing momentum around the topic.
The Internet (or Web) of Things is the next big wave in the Internet’s development - at least as disruptive as the web itself. Using smart-tagging and advanced connectivity to digitize dumb products - from bikes and bottles to refrigerators and cars - and connect them to the Internet, will allow people and companies to interact with them in new and almost unimaginable ways. Objects will be able to talk to and control each other, and collect, receive and send information. The implications of this are enormous and wide-reaching, and were due to be further unraveled at the conference.
Rob van Kranenburg, founder of a European think-tank on the Internet of Things, is one of the event’s moderators. He notes that this year, in addition to attracting CEOs, CTOs and innovation leaders from major technology and telecommunications companies, there has been a strong senior presence at an EU government level.
"This reflects the growing realization among a wide range of stakeholders that the Internet of Things will be extremely disruptive, affecting everything,” van Kranenburg says. The nearest analogy is what has happened with the Internet and the browser, which over the last two decades have challenged all sorts of business and consumer norms, he adds.

The Internet of Things, Taking On a Life Of Its Own

As this article is being published, European politicians and heavyweight representatives of some of the biggest companies in the world have been convening in Brussels, Belgium to discuss the Internet of Things. The event, The 4th Annual Internet of Things Europe: Shaping Europe’s Future Internet Policy - The road to Horizon 2020 was expected to be a significant one, attracting more senior participants than ever this year, such is the growing momentum around the topic.

The Internet (or Web) of Things is the next big wave in the Internet’s development - at least as disruptive as the web itself. Using smart-tagging and advanced connectivity to digitize dumb products - from bikes and bottles to refrigerators and cars - and connect them to the Internet, will allow people and companies to interact with them in new and almost unimaginable ways. Objects will be able to talk to and control each other, and collect, receive and send information. The implications of this are enormous and wide-reaching, and were due to be further unraveled at the conference.

Rob van Kranenburg, founder of a European think-tank on the Internet of Things, is one of the event’s moderators. He notes that this year, in addition to attracting CEOs, CTOs and innovation leaders from major technology and telecommunications companies, there has been a strong senior presence at an EU government level.

"This reflects the growing realization among a wide range of stakeholders that the Internet of Things will be extremely disruptive, affecting everything,” van Kranenburg says. The nearest analogy is what has happened with the Internet and the browser, which over the last two decades have challenged all sorts of business and consumer norms, he adds.

Futurist’s Cheat Sheet: Internet of Things
 The next phase of the the Internet will be about connecting things. The Internet of Things will be central to the infrastructure that we build…
What Is It?
Think of a thing. Really, it could be anything. A chair, a toaster, parts of a car, the lights in your house, the electricity meter, the security cameras in your offices, a fire hydrant, traffic lights … really, anything or everything that can exist could be connected to the Internet. Another name for the Internet of Things is a network of things. The network can monitor your home, your car, infrastructure (utilities such as electricity or water), traffic patterns and a variety of other possibilities to create a more informed and responsive system through data analysis. 

Futurist’s Cheat Sheet: Internet of Things

 The next phase of the the Internet will be about connecting things. The Internet of Things will be central to the infrastructure that we build…

What Is It?

Think of a thing. Really, it could be anything. A chair, a toaster, parts of a car, the lights in your house, the electricity meter, the security cameras in your offices, a fire hydrant, traffic lights … really, anything or everything that can exist could be connected to the Internet. Another name for the Internet of Things is a network of things. The network can monitor your home, your car, infrastructure (utilities such as electricity or water), traffic patterns and a variety of other possibilities to create a more informed and responsive system through data analysis. 

Smart Sutures That Detect Infections - Technology Review
Surgical sutures are mindless threads no more. Researchers have now coated them with sensors that could monitor wounds and speed up healing.

The electronic sutures, which contain ultrathin silicon sensors integrated on polymer or silk strips, can be threaded through needles, and in animal tests researchers were able to lace them through skin, pull them tight, and knot them without degrading the devices.
The sutures can precisely measure temperature—elevated temperatures indicate infection—and deliver heat to a wound site, which is known to aid healing.

Smart Sutures That Detect Infections - Technology Review

Surgical sutures are mindless threads no more. Researchers have now coated them with sensors that could monitor wounds and speed up healing.

The electronic sutures, which contain ultrathin silicon sensors integrated on polymer or silk strips, can be threaded through needles, and in animal tests researchers were able to lace them through skin, pull them tight, and knot them without degrading the devices.

The sutures can precisely measure temperature—elevated temperatures indicate infection—and deliver heat to a wound site, which is known to aid healing.

A Startup Puts the Internet in Your Couch Cushions - Technology Review
Sensor-filled Ninja Blocks connect the Web with whatever’s nearby.
Whoever has been stealing Mark Wotton’s newspaper should look out: He’s formulating a revenge plan, and it involves ninjas.
Well, technically, it involves Ninja Blocks—little computerized, sensor-equipped boxes that Wotton helped create. The blocks connect to the Internet to carry out preset actions in response to stimuli. For example, via an online service called Ninja Cloud, Wotton could set a Ninja Block equipped with a motion detector to automatically take photos of the paper thief and upload them to Facebook.
A Ninja Block might also be programmed to turn on a hall light when a child cries in her crib, or sound an alarm when the cat jumps onto the sofa. Wotton built the small devices and corresponding Web service with two cofounders. “Chances are people will have good ideas [for the devices] we’ve never thought of,” says Wotton, the company’s chief technical officer.

A Startup Puts the Internet in Your Couch Cushions - Technology Review

Sensor-filled Ninja Blocks connect the Web with whatever’s nearby.

Whoever has been stealing Mark Wotton’s newspaper should look out: He’s formulating a revenge plan, and it involves ninjas.

Well, technically, it involves Ninja Blocks—little computerized, sensor-equipped boxes that Wotton helped create. The blocks connect to the Internet to carry out preset actions in response to stimuli. For example, via an online service called Ninja Cloud, Wotton could set a Ninja Block equipped with a motion detector to automatically take photos of the paper thief and upload them to Facebook.

A Ninja Block might also be programmed to turn on a hall light when a child cries in her crib, or sound an alarm when the cat jumps onto the sofa. Wotton built the small devices and corresponding Web service with two cofounders. “Chances are people will have good ideas [for the devices] we’ve never thought of,” says Wotton, the company’s chief technical officer.

New computer chip seeks to create an “internet of things”
The Flycatcher, a new computer chip from a UK firm, will be capable of connecting traffic lights, parking meters and possibly even forests in the future.
According to the BBC, the firm, Arm Holdings, says that tiny microcontrollers based on what has been termed “Flycatcher” architecture, will be able to create an “internet of things” able to connect to nearly every conceivable device or appliance.
The miniscule microchip (0.03 inches squared) is said to be the lowest powered of its kind ever created and will soon be in motors, sensors, lights and heating systems.

New computer chip seeks to create an “internet of things”

The Flycatcher, a new computer chip from a UK firm, will be capable of connecting traffic lights, parking meters and possibly even forests in the future.

According to the BBC, the firm, Arm Holdings, says that tiny microcontrollers based on what has been termed “Flycatcher” architecture, will be able to create an “internet of things” able to connect to nearly every conceivable device or appliance.

The miniscule microchip (0.03 inches squared) is said to be the lowest powered of its kind ever created and will soon be in motors, sensors, lights and heating systems.

Ninja Blocks: Connect your world with the web. by Ninja Blocks — Kickstarter

The internet of things for the rest of us.

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Want to bridge the things in your life with the web? Maybe you want to get an alert when your friends are playing on Xbox Live, or send an SMS to your phone when someone is at your front door. Even if you’re an electronics expert, or a programming prodigy, these are complex, finicky projects. Ninja Blocks puts aside the complexity of electronics, networking, and coding and allows you to focus on creating.

Ninja Cloud

This is the Internet of Things the way it should be: Ninja Cloud is seamlessly integrated into your Ninja Blocks, allowing them to easily listen and talk to web services such as Twitter, Facebook, Dropbox, Weather and more.

How it all works

Ninja Blocks are simple but powerful open source hardware backed by an amazing web service called Ninja Cloud that allows your Ninja Block to talk to your favorite web apps. 

Each Ninja Block comes with an RGB LED and built-in temperature sensor and accelerometer. Four expansion ports and a regular USB port allow you to add further inputs and outputs. 

Ninja Cloud allows you to control your Ninja Blocks without writing a single line of code.

Open source ‘blocks’ connect the offline world with the web

Hard on the heels of our recent story about EVRYTHNG comes word of yet another venture that brings us one step closer towards an Internet of Things. The spotting this time? Ninja Blocks, an open source hardware project based in San Francisco that aims to provide “a two-way bridge between the things in your life and the web services you use every day.” READ MORE…
via springwise:

Open source ‘blocks’ connect the offline world with the web

Hard on the heels of our recent story about EVRYTHNG comes word of yet another venture that brings us one step closer towards an Internet of Things. The spotting this time? Ninja Blocks, an open source hardware project based in San Francisco that aims to provide “a two-way bridge between the things in your life and the web services you use every day.” READ MORE…

via springwise:

Bits meet bite: Check out the connected toothbrush | GigaOM
Want to really embrace the quantitative self? Forget tracking your sleep and start tracking your dental hygiene. Beam Technologies,  a year-old startup, is set to introduce a Bluetooth-enabled toothbrush  and app that will launch next month. The toothbrush contains a sensor  and Bluetooth radio that will send your brushing information to a  smartphone app. Later versions will also track how long you spent in  certain areas of the mouth and might add some kind of gamification layer  to help encourage better brushing. Alex X. Frommeyer, the CEO and founder of Beam, says the Beam Brush  should hit shelves in early March and retail for about $50 for the base  and $3 for a replaceable brush head. The Android app is ready, and the  iOS app should be ready when the toothbrush launches or soon after.

Bits meet bite: Check out the connected toothbrush | GigaOM

Want to really embrace the quantitative self? Forget tracking your sleep and start tracking your dental hygiene. Beam Technologies, a year-old startup, is set to introduce a Bluetooth-enabled toothbrush and app that will launch next month. The toothbrush contains a sensor and Bluetooth radio that will send your brushing information to a smartphone app. Later versions will also track how long you spent in certain areas of the mouth and might add some kind of gamification layer to help encourage better brushing. Alex X. Frommeyer, the CEO and founder of Beam, says the Beam Brush should hit shelves in early March and retail for about $50 for the base and $3 for a replaceable brush head. The Android app is ready, and the iOS app should be ready when the toothbrush launches or soon after.