Improved buildings could make a big dent in climate change

The construction and operation of buildings accounts for approximately 40 percent of all U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases. The most-used building material in the world, concrete, is used to construct many of the nation’s homes and office buildings — but a new MIT report says a variety of measures could drastically reduce, and ultimately even eliminate, the carbon footprint of most new concrete buildings, as well as some older ones.

"We’re trying to put more than 1,000 sensors together so Sensor Andrew serves as the nervous system for the whole campus," said Mario Berges, 25, an Oakland resident working toward a doctorate in civil engineering at CMU. “If we connect those, the campus as a whole becomes ‘smart.’” (via 'Smart' buildings, structures may save billions - Pittsburgh Tribune-Review)
Congrats to Mario, who is also helping to build a Smarter Planet through our Languages network and his site  Planeta Inteligente, while pursuing his doctorate in the engineering of smarter buildings!

"We’re trying to put more than 1,000 sensors together so Sensor Andrew serves as the nervous system for the whole campus," said Mario Berges, 25, an Oakland resident working toward a doctorate in civil engineering at CMU. “If we connect those, the campus as a whole becomes ‘smart.’” (via 'Smart' buildings, structures may save billions - Pittsburgh Tribune-Review)

Congrats to Mario, who is also helping to build a Smarter Planet through our Languages network and his site  Planeta Inteligente, while pursuing his doctorate in the engineering of smarter buildings!