Building a Smarter Malaga | Citizen IBM Blog


The IBM Smarter Cities Challenge has reinforced and contributed to the goals of the Málaga II Strategic Plan, whose strong commitment with the Technology has allowed the City to make a significant progress towards a Smart City in different citizen services in the last years. Working with IBM’s Smarter Cities team, the objective was to create a framework for a sustainable economy by developing actionable recommendations to enhance our competitiveness. These include:

  • Creating a measurable economic strategy
  • Enhancing public-private collaboration
  • Reinforcing Málaga’s branding strategy
  • Making better use of open data
What Makes a Smarter City? IBM Bets on 24 Winners
Source: Fast Company

IBM announced the first batch of cities this week awarded grants as part of the company’s three-year, $50 million Smarter Cities Challenge. The recipients—including New Orleans, Newark, Rio de Janeiro, and Jakarta—are diverse, to say the least. So how did they end up with IBM’s attention, and what happens now?
IBM chose 24 recipients from more than 200 city applicants, all of which were vying for IBM’s expertise in data analytics to tackle problems like crime, education, and budgeting.
The issues in the winning cities are as diverse as the cities themselves. In St. Louis, Mo., for example, IBM has already hit the ground running, with consultants and technology specialists using advanced data analytics to deal with the city’s public safety and education problems. Data analytics are being used to “deploy public safety officers and to figure out which students are most at risk of dropping out, as well as social service needs,” explains Stan Litow, IBM’s Vice President of Corporate Citizenship & Corporate Affairs and President of IBM’s Foundation.
In Chengdu, China, IBM will home in on the local government’s Wireless City initiative, and in Rio de Janeiro, the company will work on infrastructure, environmental, and economic challenges.

What Makes a Smarter City? IBM Bets on 24 Winners

Source: Fast Company

IBM announced the first batch of cities this week awarded grants as part of the company’s three-year, $50 million Smarter Cities Challenge. The recipients—including New Orleans, Newark, Rio de Janeiro, and Jakarta—are diverse, to say the least. So how did they end up with IBM’s attention, and what happens now?

IBM chose 24 recipients from more than 200 city applicants, all of which were vying for IBM’s expertise in data analytics to tackle problems like crime, education, and budgeting.

The issues in the winning cities are as diverse as the cities themselves. In St. Louis, Mo., for example, IBM has already hit the ground running, with consultants and technology specialists using advanced data analytics to deal with the city’s public safety and education problems. Data analytics are being used to “deploy public safety officers and to figure out which students are most at risk of dropping out, as well as social service needs,” explains Stan Litow, IBM’s Vice President of Corporate Citizenship & Corporate Affairs and President of IBM’s Foundation.

In Chengdu, China, IBM will home in on the local government’s Wireless City initiative, and in Rio de Janeiro, the company will work on infrastructure, environmental, and economic challenges.

Syracuse named one of IBM’s ‘smarter cities,’ wins technology grant from company
Source: syracuse.com

Syracuse is one of 24 cities worldwide to win a Smarter Cities Challenge grant worth up to $400,000 from technology giant IBM, the company will announce today.
The prize: As many as 10 experts from IBM will spend three weeks in Syracuse later this year working on a project chosen by city officials, to develop a software-based planning tool to combat the problem of vacant properties.
More than 200 cities applied for grants in the first annual round of a three-year, $50 million program that IBM says will ultimately help 100 cities. Syracuse is one of just eight U.S. cities chosen, and the only one from New York. International winners include Bucharest, Delhi, Glasgow, Helsinki, Jakarta and Rio de Janeiro. “Syracuse is in very good company here,” said Ari Fishkind, speaking for IBM.
Mayor Stephanie Miner said the IBM team, expected to arrive sometime next fall, will work mainly with tech-savvy city employees from planning, codes and neighborhood development.

Syracuse named one of IBM’s ‘smarter cities,’ wins technology grant from company

Source: syracuse.com

Syracuse is one of 24 cities worldwide to win a Smarter Cities Challenge grant worth up to $400,000 from technology giant IBM, the company will announce today.

The prize: As many as 10 experts from IBM will spend three weeks in Syracuse later this year working on a project chosen by city officials, to develop a software-based planning tool to combat the problem of vacant properties.

More than 200 cities applied for grants in the first annual round of a three-year, $50 million program that IBM says will ultimately help 100 cities. Syracuse is one of just eight U.S. cities chosen, and the only one from New York. International winners include Bucharest, Delhi, Glasgow, Helsinki, Jakarta and Rio de Janeiro. “Syracuse is in very good company here,” said Ari Fishkind, speaking for IBM.

Mayor Stephanie Miner said the IBM team, expected to arrive sometime next fall, will work mainly with tech-savvy city employees from planning, codes and neighborhood development.