In the fight against cancer, Watson helped identify new target proteins in a matter of weeks, not years, to accelerate the discovery of new treatments. In other industries as well—finance, retail, government, manufacturing, energy, education—Watson is forging new partnerships between humans and computers to enhance, scale and accelerate human expertise. For years, cognitive computing represented the potential for surprising new discoveries. Suddenly, with Watson, it’s the reality. Learn more at ibmwatson.com. Join the conversation at #IBMWatson.

IBM Watson API Coming: 3 Potential Business Applications For IBM’s Watson Cloud Ecosystem
Watson, the name for the IBM supercomputer best known for crushing “Jeopardy!” contestants, is prepping its “cognitive computing” technology to be utilized by third-party developers for the first time via a Watson cloud service called the “Watson Ecosystem.”
The Watson cloud service will release with a development tool kit, access to the application programming interface (API) of Watson, an application marketplace, and educational material about IBM’s supercomputer. IBM says the Watson API should look familiar to any programmers familiar with the RESTful APIs, but details like pricing for the cloud service aren’t set yet. IBM also said it will tap startups to build software for Watson through a number of prominent venture capitalists, though the company refused to name names.

IBM Watson API Coming: 3 Potential Business Applications For IBM’s Watson Cloud Ecosystem

Watson, the name for the IBM supercomputer best known for crushing “Jeopardy!” contestants, is prepping its “cognitive computing” technology to be utilized by third-party developers for the first time via a Watson cloud service called the “Watson Ecosystem.”

The Watson cloud service will release with a development tool kit, access to the application programming interface (API) of Watson, an application marketplace, and educational material about IBM’s supercomputer. IBM says the Watson API should look familiar to any programmers familiar with the RESTful APIs, but details like pricing for the cloud service aren’t set yet. IBM also said it will tap startups to build software for Watson through a number of prominent venture capitalists, though the company refused to name names.

IBM’s more powerful Watson supercomputer is opening up for public use | The Verge
IBM’s Watson supercomputer is taking a big step towards public use. Today, the company announced plans to open Watson up to developers in 2014, establishing an open platform and API that would let coders to build apps on top of the supercomputer’s database and natural language skills. It’s not the first time the project’s been used by outside groups, but the new platform will give developers complete control of the front-end, and require only minimal input from the Watson team at IBM. Companies will still have to contract an instance of Watson from IBM, but once that’s done, their programs will be able to pull questions and answers from the supercomputer in real time.
IBM says the API itself is unusually simple, providing programs with a direct path to ask Watson natural language questions and get an answers back with links to the relevant content from Watson’s database. The question is what the rest of the world might use it for. “We believe that this is such a significant development in the future of computing that we want other people involved in it,” said IBM’s chief technology officer Rob High. “We want to let other partners to have a much deeper say in how cognitive computing evolves.” The program is launching with three partners, including a Fluid Retail deployment that plans to bring a Watson-powered personal-shopper feature to North Face’s e-commerce shop in 2014.

IBM’s more powerful Watson supercomputer is opening up for public use | The Verge

IBM’s Watson supercomputer is taking a big step towards public use. Today, the company announced plans to open Watson up to developers in 2014, establishing an open platform and API that would let coders to build apps on top of the supercomputer’s database and natural language skills. It’s not the first time the project’s been used by outside groups, but the new platform will give developers complete control of the front-end, and require only minimal input from the Watson team at IBM. Companies will still have to contract an instance of Watson from IBM, but once that’s done, their programs will be able to pull questions and answers from the supercomputer in real time.

IBM says the API itself is unusually simple, providing programs with a direct path to ask Watson natural language questions and get an answers back with links to the relevant content from Watson’s database. The question is what the rest of the world might use it for. “We believe that this is such a significant development in the future of computing that we want other people involved in it,” said IBM’s chief technology officer Rob High. “We want to let other partners to have a much deeper say in how cognitive computing evolves.” The program is launching with three partners, including a Fluid Retail deployment that plans to bring a Watson-powered personal-shopper feature to North Face’s e-commerce shop in 2014.

Scientific Data Has Become So Complex, We Have to Invent New Math to Deal With It - Wired Science
Simon DeDeo, a research fellow in applied mathematics and complex systems at the Santa Fe Institute, had a problem. He was collaborating on a new project analyzing 300 years’ worth of data from the archives of London’s Old Bailey, the central criminal court of England and Wales. Granted, there was clean data in the usual straightforward Excel spreadsheet format, including such variables as indictment, verdict, and sentence for each case. But there were also full court transcripts, containing some 10 million words recorded during just under 200,000 trials.
How the hell do you analyze that data?” DeDeo wondered. It wasn’t the size of the data set that was daunting; by big data standards, the size was quite manageable. It was the sheer complexity and lack of formal structure that posed a problem. This “big data” looked nothing like the kinds of traditional data sets the former physicist would have encountered earlier in his career, when the research paradigm involved forming a hypothesis, deciding precisely what one wished to measure, then building an apparatus to make that measurement as accurately as possible.

Scientific Data Has Become So Complex, We Have to Invent New Math to Deal With It - Wired Science

Simon DeDeo, a research fellow in applied mathematics and complex systems at the Santa Fe Institute, had a problem. He was collaborating on a new project analyzing 300 years’ worth of data from the archives of London’s Old Bailey, the central criminal court of England and Wales. Granted, there was clean data in the usual straightforward Excel spreadsheet format, including such variables as indictment, verdict, and sentence for each case. But there were also full court transcripts, containing some 10 million words recorded during just under 200,000 trials.

How the hell do you analyze that data?” DeDeo wondered. It wasn’t the size of the data set that was daunting; by big data standards, the size was quite manageable. It was the sheer complexity and lack of formal structure that posed a problem. This “big data” looked nothing like the kinds of traditional data sets the former physicist would have encountered earlier in his career, when the research paradigm involved forming a hypothesis, deciding precisely what one wished to measure, then building an apparatus to make that measurement as accurately as possible.

Smart Machines: IBM’s Watson and the Era of Cognitive Computing
John E. Kelly III and Steve Hamm
We are crossing a new frontier in the evolution of computing and entering the era of cognitive systems. The victory of IBM’s Watson on the television quiz show Jeopardy! revealed how scientists and engineers at IBM and elsewhere are pushing the boundaries of science and technology to create machines that sense, learn, reason, and interact with people in new ways to provide insight and advice.In Smart Machines, John E. Kelly III, director of IBM Research, and Steve Hamm, a writer at IBM and a former business and technology journalist, introduce the fascinating world of “cognitive systems” to general audiences and provide a window into the future of computing. Cognitive systems promise to penetrate complexity and assist people and organizations in better decision making. They can help doctors evaluate and treat patients, augment the ways we see, anticipate major weather events, and contribute to smarter urban planning. Kelly and Hamm’s comprehensive perspective describes this technology inside and out and explains how it will help us conquer the harnessing and understanding of “big data,” one of the major computing challenges facing businesses and governments in the coming decades. Absorbing and impassioned, their book will inspire governments, academics, and the global tech industry to work together to power this exciting wave in innovation.
 (use code SMART to get a 30% discount)

Smart Machines: IBM’s Watson and the Era of Cognitive Computing

John E. Kelly III and Steve Hamm

We are crossing a new frontier in the evolution of computing and entering the era of cognitive systems. The victory of IBM’s Watson on the television quiz show Jeopardy! revealed how scientists and engineers at IBM and elsewhere are pushing the boundaries of science and technology to create machines that sense, learn, reason, and interact with people in new ways to provide insight and advice.

In Smart Machines, John E. Kelly III, director of IBM Research, and Steve Hamm, a writer at IBM and a former business and technology journalist, introduce the fascinating world of “cognitive systems” to general audiences and provide a window into the future of computing. Cognitive systems promise to penetrate complexity and assist people and organizations in better decision making. They can help doctors evaluate and treat patients, augment the ways we see, anticipate major weather events, and contribute to smarter urban planning. Kelly and Hamm’s comprehensive perspective describes this technology inside and out and explains how it will help us conquer the harnessing and understanding of “big data,” one of the major computing challenges facing businesses and governments in the coming decades. Absorbing and impassioned, their book will inspire governments, academics, and the global tech industry to work together to power this exciting wave in innovation.

(use code SMART to get a 30% discount)

Qantas Airways - Self-service kiosks and friendly agents revolutionize airport check in process
Getting smarter
Self-service kiosks, RFID card readers and bag-ticket printers allow Qantas passengers to perform all aspects of the check-in process in a matter of seconds.
Instrumented: Kiosks and card readers in the terminal area detect the arrival of passengers through either a mobile device or RFID-embedded frequent flyer card.

Interconnected: The check-in solution is integrated in near real time with the airline’s reservation, inventory and departure system.

Intelligent: Analysis of passenger behavior has enabled Qantas to optimize the allocation of agent resources, as well as the configuration of kiosk and other devices throughout the terminal.

Qantas Airways - Self-service kiosks and friendly agents revolutionize airport check in process

Getting smarter

Self-service kiosks, RFID card readers and bag-ticket printers allow Qantas passengers to perform all aspects of the check-in process in a matter of seconds.

  • Instrumented: Kiosks and card readers in the terminal area detect the arrival of passengers through either a mobile device or RFID-embedded frequent flyer card.

  • Interconnected: The check-in solution is integrated in near real time with the airline’s reservation, inventory and departure system.

  • Intelligent: Analysis of passenger behavior has enabled Qantas to optimize the allocation of agent resources, as well as the configuration of kiosk and other devices throughout the terminal.

jackmason:

Brooklane turned 5 today!
Five years ago I decided to test the waters with a very new service called Tumblr.  After playing around with it for a few months, in the fall I set up http://smarterplanet.tumblr.com as a microblogging companion to the Smarter Planet “traditional” blog that was launching in support of IBM’s big bold new blue strategic initiative.
So the 5th anniversary of this personal tumblr is just a harbinger of the Smarter Planet 5th birthday coming in a few months. Wow, wow wow.

jackmason:

Brooklane turned 5 today!


Five years ago I decided to test the waters with a very new service called Tumblr.  After playing around with it for a few months, in the fall I set up http://smarterplanet.tumblr.com as a microblogging companion to the Smarter Planet “traditional” blog that was launching in support of IBM’s big bold new blue strategic initiative.

So the 5th anniversary of this personal tumblr is just a harbinger of the Smarter Planet 5th birthday coming in a few months. Wow, wow wow.

smartercities:

IBM Turns Ads Into Useful Urban Furniture | Fast Company
Did you ever need a ramp for your luggage (or bike), or a shelter from a sudden downpour, or a place to sit down and tie your shoe? IBM believes that city life can be awfully inconvenient—and that cities should be designed with the needs of ordinary citizens in mind.

smartercities:

IBM Turns Ads Into Useful Urban Furniture | Fast Company

Did you ever need a ramp for your luggage (or bike), or a shelter from a sudden downpour, or a place to sit down and tie your shoe? IBM believes that city life can be awfully inconvenient—and that cities should be designed with the needs of ordinary citizens in mind.

A Planet of Intelligent Things (by IBMCuriosityShop)

Software is the “invisible thread” running through so many products that we use today; It’s what animates them, gives them their purpose, and acts as the “brains” to make them smarter.

IBM recently announced new software to help organizations bring intelligence to the products, systems and applications people use everyday. And here’s a simple video that sketches out how software is powering a planet of intelligent things.

View the associated announcement:

Step Into the Smarter Planet Time Machine!
For a little Friday Fun, try one of these three settings:
…One Week Ago
…One Month Ago
…One Year Ago
Or for quintessential quantum experience, try the Random button to sample one of the more than 4000 posts about All Things Smarter since we started three years ago in November, 2008.
You are welcome to like or reblog your favorites to feed our collective intelligence on those posts that best reflect how the world’s systems can become more sentient and senseable.
Of course, you can always browse through the misty mountains of Smarter Time via the Archive. Or for a real time warp, scroll through all the Time Machine posts.
Want to hold Smarter Planet in your hand? Get the mobile apps for iOS and Android.
(about the image)
Record-Breaking Laser Hits 500 Trillion Watts | Wired Science | Wired.com

Step Into the Smarter Planet Time Machine!

For a little Friday Fun, try one of these three settings:

Or for quintessential quantum experience, try the Random button to sample one of the more than 4000 posts about All Things Smarter since we started three years ago in November, 2008.

You are welcome to like or reblog your favorites to feed our collective intelligence on those posts that best reflect how the world’s systems can become more sentient and senseable.

Of course, you can always browse through the misty mountains of Smarter Time via the Archive. Or for a real time warp, scroll through all the Time Machine posts.

Want to hold Smarter Planet in your hand? Get the mobile apps for iOS and Android.

(about the image)

Record-Breaking Laser Hits 500 Trillion Watts | Wired Science | Wired.com