The State Grid Corporation of China Is Running a Smart-Grid Project Using Passive Optical Networking Technology | MIT Technology Review

As well as making the grid more reliable and efficient, the technology could deliver high-speed Internet, TV, and telephony.


hina has begun testing smart-grid technology that could eventually be deployed nationwide to make the delivery of electricity more reliable and efficient. It might also serve as a way to deliver high-speed Internet, TV, and telephony to the farthest reaches of the country.

The State Grid Corporation of China (SGCC) is running the smart-grid project using passive optical networking (PON) technology—a high-bandwidth data wiring that can be run inside electric power cables without interference. Around 86,000 premises in China have so far been connected to the grid; if the project goes nationwide, it would cost around $2 billion to deploy.

Smart grids use computer networking to let utilities monitor everything from electricity use in customers’ homes to the performance of generators at power stations in real time. The concept has gained much attention in the United States but has been slow to catch on. This is partly because regional utilities have different ideas about how to best connect the last mile of the smart grid to users’ homes, says Rajit Gadh, a professor in UCLA’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Car tech: Electric vehicles get an IT assist - Computerworld
A new IT challenge is emerging: building a vast  infrastructure for electric vehicles, or EVs. Information technology is  needed to give the electric car a much-needed push — handling the vast  data processing required to optimize power utilization from the  generation plant all the way down to an individual owner’s garage. These  functions are needed to make the new cars successful, analysts say.
New EV models from Chevy and Nissan, with Ford and BMW following this  summer, can already connect to a smart grid and transmit a wealth of  data about battery usage and driving patterns over 3G. Toyota and  Microsoft jointly announced in early April that they are co-developing  an Azure-based service to provide data to Toyota EV drivers.
"IT can analyze the onboard and off-board energy management required  for electric cars and help the driver find the next charging station,"  says Thilo Koslowski, vice president for automotive at Gartner. Other  tasks tech can assist with, he says, include reserving a charging  station, routing drivers to charging stations and starting the billing  process to pay for the car’s charging, as well as controlling the power  load for electric utilities.  "We can also analyze driving behavior and  decide where to put stations," he adds.

Car tech: Electric vehicles get an IT assist - Computerworld

A new IT challenge is emerging: building a vast infrastructure for electric vehicles, or EVs. Information technology is needed to give the electric car a much-needed push — handling the vast data processing required to optimize power utilization from the generation plant all the way down to an individual owner’s garage. These functions are needed to make the new cars successful, analysts say.

New EV models from Chevy and Nissan, with Ford and BMW following this summer, can already connect to a smart grid and transmit a wealth of data about battery usage and driving patterns over 3G. Toyota and Microsoft jointly announced in early April that they are co-developing an Azure-based service to provide data to Toyota EV drivers.

"IT can analyze the onboard and off-board energy management required for electric cars and help the driver find the next charging station," says Thilo Koslowski, vice president for automotive at Gartner. Other tasks tech can assist with, he says, include reserving a charging station, routing drivers to charging stations and starting the billing process to pay for the car’s charging, as well as controlling the power load for electric utilities. "We can also analyze driving behavior and decide where to put stations," he adds.

Smart Grid: The smart grid’s next sonic boom: Smart buildings meet the smart grid
The  building automation/energy management market is set to explode, as the  research report described below confirms. Why now, after being two years  away from the big time for 25 years in a row? First, technology has  matured to the point you really can manage an entire building from a  single console.  
  
Second,  and more importantly, the smart grid and demand response have created  new revenue streams. You don’t just get the savings from energy  efficiency, you can also tap into DR, time-of-use pricing, white  certificates and more, depending on your location. As a result,  virtually every big corporation that has anything to do with HVAC,  building controls or building automation is launching major new efforts. – Jesse Berst 
If  there’s any doubt that the smart buildings market is finally hitting  its stride, a new forecast makes it pretty clear. U.S. investments in building energy management systems (BEMS) are expected to hit $10.1 billion in the period between 2010 and  2016 – with a compound annual growth rate of 17.4%, according to a  forecast report from cleantech market analyst firm Pike Research. 
  
Commercial  and residential buildings chew up almost two-thirds of the energy used  in the country, so it’s a natural that building owners and managers are  hunting for ways to cut energy costs and environmental impacts. As a  result, smart building technologies are on the rise, such as automation  and controls, high-efficiency systems and equipment and a wider  selection of energy management services. The report, Building Energy  Management Systems, says the growth of BEMS is unfolding first in  campuses and large commercial buildings and will then move into small  and mid-size buildings. 
  
"When  it comes to energy use, commercial buildings are getting smarter all  the time," research analyst Jevan Fox said. "This intelligence, which  encompasses everything from sensor networks to predictive supply and  demand algorithms  to  high-efficiency HVAC systems, will require a greater level of control  and coordination than legacy building management systems can provide.”

Smart Grid: The smart grid’s next sonic boom: Smart buildings meet the smart grid

The building automation/energy management market is set to explode, as the research report described below confirms. Why now, after being two years away from the big time for 25 years in a row? First, technology has matured to the point you really can manage an entire building from a single console. 

 

Second, and more importantly, the smart grid and demand response have created new revenue streams. You don’t just get the savings from energy efficiency, you can also tap into DR, time-of-use pricing, white certificates and more, depending on your location. As a result, virtually every big corporation that has anything to do with HVAC, building controls or building automation is launching major new efforts. – Jesse Berst

If there’s any doubt that the smart buildings market is finally hitting its stride, a new forecast makes it pretty clear. U.S. investments in building energy management systems (BEMS) are expected to hit $10.1 billion in the period between 2010 and 2016 – with a compound annual growth rate of 17.4%, according to a forecast report from cleantech market analyst firm Pike Research.

 

Commercial and residential buildings chew up almost two-thirds of the energy used in the country, so it’s a natural that building owners and managers are hunting for ways to cut energy costs and environmental impacts. As a result, smart building technologies are on the rise, such as automation and controls, high-efficiency systems and equipment and a wider selection of energy management services. The report, Building Energy Management Systems, says the growth of BEMS is unfolding first in campuses and large commercial buildings and will then move into small and mid-size buildings.

 

"When it comes to energy use, commercial buildings are getting smarter all the time," research analyst Jevan Fox said. "This intelligence, which encompasses everything from sensor networks to predictive supply and demand algorithms  to high-efficiency HVAC systems, will require a greater level of control and coordination than legacy building management systems can provide.”

The Power 7 chips, launched today, use a quarter of the energy used by the Power 6, but the new products offer double the performance, says IBM. IBM’s Smarter Planet strategy aims to build green technologies, which will require lower-power processors says Ross Mauri, the company’s general manager of Power systems.”Think about smarter [energy] grids or smarter traffic solutions and smarter healthcare,” he told TheStreet. “That has opened up a new set of opportunities.”

Smarter Oil, Energy on the GBS Video Studio

The Smarter Energy “storyboard” on IBM’s Global Business Services Video Studio includes videos on innovations in oil exploration, smartgrids and the vital role that sustainable energy plays in helping us build a smarter planet.

Through the On Demand library, you can also watch replays of webcasts or other sets of clips on subjects such as Smarter Analytics.

Wireless communication companies are particularly happy with all the attention focused on the smart grid, since wireless networks can be tapped to help both utilities and consumers monitor and control energy consumption. That will benefit firms that are building wireless sensor technology, too — and Monday morning wireless sensor network startup Arch Rock plans to debut its own energy management software service, called Energy Optimizer. (via Wireless Sensors to Tackle Energy Management)

Wireless communication companies are particularly happy with all the attention focused on the smart grid, since wireless networks can be tapped to help both utilities and consumers monitor and control energy consumption. That will benefit firms that are building wireless sensor technology, too — and Monday morning wireless sensor network startup Arch Rock plans to debut its own energy management software service, called Energy Optimizer. (via Wireless Sensors to Tackle Energy Management)

Wireless carriers such as AT&T Corp. are setting their sights on so-called smart grids as a big business opportunity that could juice up earnings by utilizing excess capacity on their cellphone networks. The upshot for consumers is they may eventually be able to monitor and control home-energy use through a cellphone that talks to a digital meter and other devices, though that service is still in development. (via Wireless Firms Eye ‘Smart Grids’ - WSJ.com)

Wireless carriers such as AT&T Corp. are setting their sights on so-called smart grids as a big business opportunity that could juice up earnings by utilizing excess capacity on their cellphone networks. The upshot for consumers is they may eventually be able to monitor and control home-energy use through a cellphone that talks to a digital meter and other devices, though that service is still in development. (via Wireless Firms Eye ‘Smart Grids’ - WSJ.com)

If we are going to spend billions of dollars to fix our ailing infrastructure, let’s make sure we do it right. Here are the technologies to make that happen. (via Smart Roads. Smart Bridges. Smart Grids. - WSJ.com)

If we are going to spend billions of dollars to fix our ailing infrastructure, let’s make sure we do it right. Here are the technologies to make that happen. (via Smart Roads. Smart Bridges. Smart Grids. - WSJ.com)

Companies such as Johnson Controls and IBM have been very vocal about their vision of a ‘smart infrastructure’ future. And there are a number of ‘Smart Grid’ startups offering utility-scale and building/home energy management solutions. Cisco: ‘Smarter’ Energy Networks Cisco Systems is widely associated with the hardware ‘backbone’ (e.g. routers) of the Internet, but the company is expanding into new web-based services like video collaboration and energy management. Cisco has a very simple vision of the future of energy efficiency: If it is on the ‘network’, then we can make it more efficient. Why is this important? Because within a decade or two most everything that produces and consumes power will be integrated into an information (web) network. (via The Energy Roadmap - Cisco Offers Smart Energy Solutions: “Everything Connected to the Network Can Be Greener”)

Companies such as Johnson Controls and IBM have been very vocal about their vision of a ‘smart infrastructure’ future. And there are a number of ‘Smart Grid’ startups offering utility-scale and building/home energy management solutions. Cisco: ‘Smarter’ Energy Networks Cisco Systems is widely associated with the hardware ‘backbone’ (e.g. routers) of the Internet, but the company is expanding into new web-based services like video collaboration and energy management. Cisco has a very simple vision of the future of energy efficiency: If it is on the ‘network’, then we can make it more efficient. Why is this important? Because within a decade or two most everything that produces and consumes power will be integrated into an information (web) network. (via The Energy Roadmap - Cisco Offers Smart Energy Solutions: “Everything Connected to the Network Can Be Greener”)