In the Coming Age of the Connected Home, Your Phone Will Be a Magic Wand |  Wired.com
Your smartphone is going domestic. In the age of the connected home, your mobile devices are becoming the central command, the brains, if you will, of the entire smarthome experience.
It makes sense. Rather than remote controls with menus to memorize and knobs, dials and switches to manipulate, your smartphone or tablet becomes one remote to rule them all. You’ve always got it with you when you’re out and about, it’s never far from hand when you’re sitting on the couch and it’s dead-simple to use.
What we’re seeing started with the birth of the smartphone, when gadgetmakers realized smartphone integration could add tremendous value to consumers’ product experiences. It started with simple apps that transform your phone into a remote control for a DVR or set-top box, letting you use a touchscreen to navigate complex user interfaces. It grew with apps that tie into our home security systems and, more recently, our appliances. Remembering if the milk in your fridge is past its prime or whether you have recipes based on the things in your freezer was once the stuff of The Jetsons, but is increasingly commonplace today.

In the Coming Age of the Connected Home, Your Phone Will Be a Magic Wand |  Wired.com

Your smartphone is going domestic. In the age of the connected home, your mobile devices are becoming the central command, the brains, if you will, of the entire smarthome experience.

It makes sense. Rather than remote controls with menus to memorize and knobs, dials and switches to manipulate, your smartphone or tablet becomes one remote to rule them all. You’ve always got it with you when you’re out and about, it’s never far from hand when you’re sitting on the couch and it’s dead-simple to use.

What we’re seeing started with the birth of the smartphone, when gadgetmakers realized smartphone integration could add tremendous value to consumers’ product experiences. It started with simple apps that transform your phone into a remote control for a DVR or set-top box, letting you use a touchscreen to navigate complex user interfaces. It grew with apps that tie into our home security systems and, more recently, our appliances. Remembering if the milk in your fridge is past its prime or whether you have recipes based on the things in your freezer was once the stuff of The Jetsons, but is increasingly commonplace today.

emergentfutures:

What Happens When Our Cellphones Can Predict Our Every Move?



Your cellphone knows where you’ve been. And new research shows it can take a pretty good guess at where you’re going next.


A team of British researchers has developed an algorithm that uses tracking data on people’s phones to predict where they’ll be in 24 hours. The average error: just 20 meters.
Paul Higgins: You need to be careful when interpreting this because an average error of 20 metres hides a lot of information. For instance if the sampling is every minute then the average becomes lower because most people will be at home or work most of the time.
Full Story: Slate

emergentfutures:

What Happens When Our Cellphones Can Predict Our Every Move?



Your cellphone knows where you’ve been. And new research shows it can take a pretty good guess at where you’re going next.

A team of British researchers has developed an algorithm that uses tracking data on people’s phones to predict where they’ll be in 24 hours. The average error: just 20 meters.

Paul Higgins: You need to be careful when interpreting this because an average error of 20 metres hides a lot of information. For instance if the sampling is every minute then the average becomes lower because most people will be at home or work most of the time.

Full Story: Slate

IBM Expands Smart Grid Work with EV Charging App, EcoGrid Partnership | GreenBiz.com
IBM is teaming up with Swiss utility EKZ to develop a smartphone app that will enable drivers of electric cars  to charge their vehicles and manage energy use with a click of a virtual  button.
The pilot by IBM scientists in the Swiss canton of Zurich is one of  the company’s two most recent moves to advance its market presence in  Europe’s developing smart grid.
IBM said last week that in addition to the partnership with EKZ, the firm has joined the newly formed EcoGrid EU project in Denmark. The project, which is led by a European  Union-funded consortium, is aimed at developing a smart and green energy  grid in which at least 50 percent of energy comes from renewable energy  sources — wind power, solar energy and biogas.

IBM Expands Smart Grid Work with EV Charging App, EcoGrid Partnership | GreenBiz.com

IBM is teaming up with Swiss utility EKZ to develop a smartphone app that will enable drivers of electric cars to charge their vehicles and manage energy use with a click of a virtual button.

The pilot by IBM scientists in the Swiss canton of Zurich is one of the company’s two most recent moves to advance its market presence in Europe’s developing smart grid.

IBM said last week that in addition to the partnership with EKZ, the firm has joined the newly formed EcoGrid EU project in Denmark. The project, which is led by a European Union-funded consortium, is aimed at developing a smart and green energy grid in which at least 50 percent of energy comes from renewable energy sources — wind power, solar energy and biogas.


I’ve always been a big fan of the Internet of Things, especially after Kevin Kelly’s TED lecture a few years back. After seeing this nice infographic done by Intel, I can only acknowledge we’re still in a very early stage of this idea.
Most types of devices you see (check the top right corner) are display devices, meaning they’ll present online content on a display, either “raw” as in a browser, or translated to an application like a game or a navigation system.
The real power of the Internet of Things will come when less obvious objects are connected to the internet. For example shoes, fridges, coffee machines, wardrobes, tooth brushes, doors, light switches… I’m sure there are shoes that go online already (Nike+ for example), coffee machines that make coffee based on the weather found online, tooth brushes that share your amount of turns and light switches that you can switch on and off from your smartphone. Yet these are hardly mainstream nor have they unveiled the true potential of the Internet Of Things.
If you think about all new technologies that are coming up in the coming months: 4G networks, RFID or NFC particularly, better face, object and voice recognition, … Combining that with faster processors, high resolution displays, longer battery life, … And putting that all into more objects we use every day, I think you can agree we’ve got some very exciting times ahead of us! The Internet of Things has only just started…

castemelijn:

I’ve always been a big fan of the Internet of Things, especially after Kevin Kelly’s TED lecture a few years back. After seeing this nice infographic done by Intel, I can only acknowledge we’re still in a very early stage of this idea.

Most types of devices you see (check the top right corner) are display devices, meaning they’ll present online content on a display, either “raw” as in a browser, or translated to an application like a game or a navigation system.

The real power of the Internet of Things will come when less obvious objects are connected to the internet. For example shoes, fridges, coffee machines, wardrobes, tooth brushes, doors, light switches… I’m sure there are shoes that go online already (Nike+ for example), coffee machines that make coffee based on the weather found online, tooth brushes that share your amount of turns and light switches that you can switch on and off from your smartphone. Yet these are hardly mainstream nor have they unveiled the true potential of the Internet Of Things.

If you think about all new technologies that are coming up in the coming months: 4G networks, RFID or NFC particularly, better face, object and voice recognition, … Combining that with faster processors, high resolution displays, longer battery life, … And putting that all into more objects we use every day, I think you can agree we’ve got some very exciting times ahead of us! The Internet of Things has only just started…

castemelijn:

Crowdsourcing Realtime Transit Updates | Sustainable Cities Collective
Real-time  data crowdsourced from transit riders will improve information sharing  for Pittsburgh’s public transport. Photo by Amphis d’@illeurs.
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University released a new smartphone application that will help transit users create a database of real-time information of their local transit agencies.
Cities  and transit agencies around the world are making riding easier for  their customers by offering real-time arrival data not only at stations  and stops but also online to be accessed from anywhere. Unfortunately,  many of these systems require hardware to be installed in every vehicle  and run on expensive, proprietary software that cash-strapped agencies  are often unable to afford.
Additionally, the level of  information available in these systems is limited generally to arrival  time estimates, which can be of limited use to riders with disabilities.  For these passengers, information about the space available on a  vehicle is of paramount importance.
Researchers at the  Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Accessible Public  Transportation, a part of CMU’s School of Computer Science, recognized  these problems. They decided to tackle them head on.
The idea is  simple: many transit agencies can’t afford to install proprietary  Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL) systems in their entire fleet. Yet,  with the proliferation of GPS-enabled mobile devices, many transit  vehicles already have a latent ability to be tracked.

Crowdsourcing Realtime Transit Updates | Sustainable Cities Collective

Real-time data crowdsourced from transit riders will improve information sharing for Pittsburgh’s public transport. Photo by Amphis d’@illeurs.

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University released a new smartphone application that will help transit users create a database of real-time information of their local transit agencies.

Cities and transit agencies around the world are making riding easier for their customers by offering real-time arrival data not only at stations and stops but also online to be accessed from anywhere. Unfortunately, many of these systems require hardware to be installed in every vehicle and run on expensive, proprietary software that cash-strapped agencies are often unable to afford.

Additionally, the level of information available in these systems is limited generally to arrival time estimates, which can be of limited use to riders with disabilities. For these passengers, information about the space available on a vehicle is of paramount importance.

Researchers at the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Accessible Public Transportation, a part of CMU’s School of Computer Science, recognized these problems. They decided to tackle them head on.

The idea is simple: many transit agencies can’t afford to install proprietary Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL) systems in their entire fleet. Yet, with the proliferation of GPS-enabled mobile devices, many transit vehicles already have a latent ability to be tracked.

There’s a huge group of mobile users that you may be overlooking as you develop your hospital’s mobile strategy. They’re “information seekers,” and they will be the largest cohort of mobile healthcare consumers in the future, according to a new report by IBM, “The Future of Connected Health Devices.” Traditional mHealth users are a small percentage of highly motivated individuals with significant fitness goals or debilitating chronic conditions. Both groups are willing to put in the time to learn and use smartphone apps, remote monitoring devices and other mobile health products, IBM’s researchers found in their study of more than 1,300 mobile health device users.

Mobile app diagnoses malaria from a single drop of blood
The virtual ink had barely dried on our story about the Skin Scan app for diagnosing melanoma when we received word of another, equally  compelling mobile diagnostic tool. Focusing this time on the millions of  people at risk from malaria in sub-Saharan Africa and other parts of  the world, Lifelens is a project that has created a smartphone app to diagnose the insidious, mosquito-borne disease. READ MORE…
via springwise:

Mobile app diagnoses malaria from a single drop of blood

The virtual ink had barely dried on our story about the Skin Scan app for diagnosing melanoma when we received word of another, equally compelling mobile diagnostic tool. Focusing this time on the millions of people at risk from malaria in sub-Saharan Africa and other parts of the world, Lifelens is a project that has created a smartphone app to diagnose the insidious, mosquito-borne disease. READ MORE…

via springwise:

MedCoach for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad
Having a hard time keeping track of your meds? With MedCoach by  GreatCall, you’ll never miss another medication! This easy-to-use and  valuable app helps you remember to take your medications at the right  time of day - everyday. Stay on schedule with your medication regimen  and even connect to your pharmacy to refill your prescriptions.

MedCoach for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad

Having a hard time keeping track of your meds? With MedCoach by GreatCall, you’ll never miss another medication! This easy-to-use and valuable app helps you remember to take your medications at the right time of day - everyday. Stay on schedule with your medication regimen and even connect to your pharmacy to refill your prescriptions.

IBM - A Smarter Planet mobile apps
Evidence of a smarter planet is everywhere.And people are more mobile than ever.
And now the latest news about our smarter planet can be too, going wherever you and your smart phone go. Download these new apps to keep information, links and multimedia  related to Smarter Planet—and our new initiative The Social  Business—always at your fingertips. The apps include content optimized  for your device from ibm.com, the Smarter Planet blog, our Tumblr sites,  YouTube, the IBM Centennial Icons of Progress project and more.

IBM - A Smarter Planet mobile apps

Evidence of a smarter planet is everywhere.
And people are more mobile than ever.

And now the latest news about our smarter planet can be too, going wherever you and your smart phone go.
Download these new apps to keep information, links and multimedia related to Smarter Planet—and our new initiative The Social Business—always at your fingertips. The apps include content optimized for your device from ibm.com, the Smarter Planet blog, our Tumblr sites, YouTube, the IBM Centennial Icons of Progress project and more.