Special Paint Turns Any Surface Into A Battery - PSFK
Researchers at the Rice University in Texas, USA, have created a lithium-ion battery paint that can be applied to any surface. The battery-based paint was experimented on bathroom tiles, which were able to power a set of LED lights for six hours, and provided a steady 2.4 volts.
The lead author of the project, Neelam Singh, commented that her team had spent hours formulating, mixing and testing the paints. The working concept means that traditional packaging for batteries can have a “more flexible approach that allows all kinds of new design and integration possibilities for storage devices.”
via PSFK: 

Special Paint Turns Any Surface Into A Battery - PSFK

Researchers at the Rice University in Texas, USA, have created a lithium-ion battery paint that can be applied to any surface. The battery-based paint was experimented on bathroom tiles, which were able to power a set of LED lights for six hours, and provided a steady 2.4 volts.

The lead author of the project, Neelam Singh, commented that her team had spent hours formulating, mixing and testing the paints. The working concept means that traditional packaging for batteries can have a “more flexible approach that allows all kinds of new design and integration possibilities for storage devices.”



via PSFK: 

Paintable  Electronics? NIST Studies Spray-On Manufacturing of  Transistors
A multidisciplinary research team at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has found* that an organic semiconductor may be a viable candidate for creating large-area electronics, such as solar cells and displays that can be sprayed onto a surface as easily as paint. While the electronics will not be ready for market anytime soon, the research team says the material they studied could overcome one of the main cost hurdles blocking the large-scale manufacture of organic thin-film transistors, the development of which also could lead to a host of devices inexpensive enough to be disposable. 

Paintable Electronics? NIST Studies Spray-On Manufacturing of Transistors

A multidisciplinary research team at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has found* that an organic semiconductor may be a viable candidate for creating large-area electronics, such as solar cells and displays that can be sprayed onto a surface as easily as paint. While the electronics will not be ready for market anytime soon, the research team says the material they studied could overcome one of the main cost hurdles blocking the large-scale manufacture of organic thin-film transistors, the development of which also could lead to a host of devices inexpensive enough to be disposable.