Smarter Energy  Outlets

Authentication Outlet Newly Developed

— Realized by combination of the contactless IC card technology and the new technology “RFID Over Power Line” —

Sony has developed an authentication outlet that can manage and allow electricity use by identifying a user or device (or both) based on authentication. This new technology aims at an outlet, an infrastructure that electricity always flows through when used. Using this outlet, the user can actively control and manage power consumption on a user basis as well as on a device basis.

Concept movie: New Authentication Outlet (by Sony)

Sony’s head-mounted 3D visor is real, HMZ-T1 arrives in Japan November 11th - Engadget
Remember that crazy wearable 3D display concept Sony was showing off at CES 2011? Turns out the company is actually going to make it, and the HMZ-T1 is scheduled to be released in Japan on November 11th. While the design has changed slightly since we first laid our eyes, and heads, on it, the specs appear to be the same, with two 1280x720 0.7-inch OLED panels mounted in front of each eye giving the wearer an experience similar to viewing a 750-inch screen from 20m away, as well as 5.1 surround sound from headphones integrated into the Head Mounted Display (HMD). You can see the helmet above, as well as the processor unit (complete with HDMI input and output, so you can take off the helmet and watch on TV) that it must remain tethered to. Pricing is expected to be 60,000 yen ($783 US). Check out the press release and our hands-on video from CES after the break and decide if living out a Geordi La Forge-style fantasy is worth it.

Sony’s head-mounted 3D visor is real, HMZ-T1 arrives in Japan November 11th - Engadget

Remember that crazy wearable 3D display concept Sony was showing off at CES 2011? Turns out the company is actually going to make it, and the HMZ-T1 is scheduled to be released in Japan on November 11th. While the design has changed slightly since we first laid our eyes, and heads, on it, the specs appear to be the same, with two 1280x720 0.7-inch OLED panels mounted in front of each eye giving the wearer an experience similar to viewing a 750-inch screen from 20m away, as well as 5.1 surround sound from headphones integrated into the Head Mounted Display (HMD). You can see the helmet above, as well as the processor unit (complete with HDMI input and output, so you can take off the helmet and watch on TV) that it must remain tethered to. Pricing is expected to be 60,000 yen ($783 US). Check out the press release and our hands-on video from CES after the break and decide if living out a Geordi La Forge-style fantasy is worth it.

Sony Sets Its Sights on Augmented Reality - Technology Review
The future of mobile gaming will merge the virtual and real worlds.
Sony has demonstrated a new augmented reality system called Smart AR that can be built into the company’s future gaming devices.
Augmented reality involves mapping virtual objects onto a view of  the real world, usually as seen through the screen of a smart phone. The  technology has so far been used to create a handful of dazzling  smart-phone apps, but has yet to take off in a big way. However, many  believe that mobile gaming could prove to be an ideal platform for the  technology. With Smart AR, certain real-world objects could become part  of a game when viewed through a device such as the PlayStation Portable.  This could allow game characters to appear on a tabletop, perhaps, or  to respond to the movement of real objects.
Unlike many augmented reality systems, Smart AR does not use  satellite tracking or special markers to figure out where to overlay a  virtual object. Instead, it uses object recognition. This means it works  where GPS signals are poor or nonexistent, for example, indoors. The  markerless system is more difficult to pull off, but it allows many more  everyday objects to be used.

Sony Sets Its Sights on Augmented Reality - Technology Review

The future of mobile gaming will merge the virtual and real worlds.

Sony has demonstrated a new augmented reality system called Smart AR that can be built into the company’s future gaming devices.

Augmented reality involves mapping virtual objects onto a view of the real world, usually as seen through the screen of a smart phone. The technology has so far been used to create a handful of dazzling smart-phone apps, but has yet to take off in a big way. However, many believe that mobile gaming could prove to be an ideal platform for the technology. With Smart AR, certain real-world objects could become part of a game when viewed through a device such as the PlayStation Portable. This could allow game characters to appear on a tabletop, perhaps, or to respond to the movement of real objects.

Unlike many augmented reality systems, Smart AR does not use satellite tracking or special markers to figure out where to overlay a virtual object. Instead, it uses object recognition. This means it works where GPS signals are poor or nonexistent, for example, indoors. The markerless system is more difficult to pull off, but it allows many more everyday objects to be used.

Rollable, The Flexible Screen by Sony: Sony has developed ‘Rollable’, a revolutionary OLED full color display that can wrap around a thin cylinder. Even when rolling up, the image is not affected and still plays with the same quality and speed. The screen roll-up capabilities are made possible thanks to high performing organic thin-film transistors resulting in an ultra thin but also resistant display.

Rollable, The Flexible Screen by Sony: Sony has developed ‘Rollable’, a revolutionary OLED full color display that can wrap around a thin cylinder. Even when rolling up, the image is not affected and still plays with the same quality and speed. The screen roll-up capabilities are made possible thanks to high performing organic thin-film transistors resulting in an ultra thin but also resistant display.

PlayStation Move arrives today for some, Sunday for others | The Digital Home - CNET News
Sony’s PlayStation Move is the company’s answer to the Nintendo Wii. It allows gamers to control on-screen action by waving the Move motion controller around. In order for it to work, users will need to have a PlayStation Eye camera, along with the motion controller. They also need to be playing a title that supports the new technology.

PlayStation Move arrives today for some, Sunday for others | The Digital Home - CNET News

Sony’s PlayStation Move is the company’s answer to the Nintendo Wii. It allows gamers to control on-screen action by waving the Move motion controller around. In order for it to work, users will need to have a PlayStation Eye camera, along with the motion controller. They also need to be playing a title that supports the new technology.

Sony demos game controller to track motion and emotion | New Scientist

The latest games console arms race – to perfect hands-free, full-body game control – just got more competitive.

Sony has unveiled just such a system called Interactive Communication Unit or ICU, at the Vision 2009 trade fair in Stuttgart, Germany. It uses stereo cameras to watch a player and, like a pair of eyes, to judge depth.

Microsoft unveiled its own full body controller in the summer summer, Project Natal, due to be released for the Xbox 360 games console late in 2010.

New Scientist