World’s First City-Wide White Space Network Launched - Tech Europe - WSJ
The world’s first city-wide white-space network has been unveiled today in Cambridge, England.
Neul, which has been part of a trial of the technology in Cambridge, said the trial had been a success. According to Glenn Collinson, Neul’s co-founder, the company was moving to a pre-commercial phase this year with a view to a full commercial roll out in 2013. “The network is aimed squarely at ‘the Internet of things’ applications, machine to machine communication,” he said. “We see a whole host of things being enabled by this in smart cities.”
White space is the unused and underused parts of the wireless spectrum. For example, around the world many TV channels are left vacant in most locations. One of the issues had been whether there would be interference in the remaining TV frequencies. The trial established it was possible to keep them apart.
Other potential uses of the freed-up spectrum was as an alternative way of providing mobile broadband connectivity. Mr. Collinson said this was not on offer.
One of the first uses of the network will be smart electricity meters. This is the first step toward smart electricity grids that will allow electricity supply to be matched more efficiently to real-time demand.
“We see that as the first of many smart applications, starting in Cambridge, but spreading out to other cities.” Mr. Collinson would not say which cities were next, but did say there would be announcements about a city in North America and one in Asia.

World’s First City-Wide White Space Network Launched - Tech Europe - WSJ

The world’s first city-wide white-space network has been unveiled today in Cambridge, England.

Neul, which has been part of a trial of the technology in Cambridge, said the trial had been a success. According to Glenn Collinson, Neul’s co-founder, the company was moving to a pre-commercial phase this year with a view to a full commercial roll out in 2013. “The network is aimed squarely at ‘the Internet of things’ applications, machine to machine communication,” he said. “We see a whole host of things being enabled by this in smart cities.”

White space is the unused and underused parts of the wireless spectrum. For example, around the world many TV channels are left vacant in most locations. One of the issues had been whether there would be interference in the remaining TV frequencies. The trial established it was possible to keep them apart.

Other potential uses of the freed-up spectrum was as an alternative way of providing mobile broadband connectivity. Mr. Collinson said this was not on offer.

One of the first uses of the network will be smart electricity meters. This is the first step toward smart electricity grids that will allow electricity supply to be matched more efficiently to real-time demand.

“We see that as the first of many smart applications, starting in Cambridge, but spreading out to other cities.” Mr. Collinson would not say which cities were next, but did say there would be announcements about a city in North America and one in Asia.

Rural Broadband Could Fill Those White Spaces - Ina Fried - News - AllThingsD
On the one hand, the decision by the Federal Communications Commission last week to approve the first devices to run in the “white spaces” between television channels was a modest one.
The decision initially covers only one product, and is limited to the pilot city of Wilmington, N.C.
But backers of the technology hope those white spaces prove as big a  boost to innovation as the unlicensed spectrum that gave birth to Wi-Fi.
“We see this as a multibillion-dollar industry,” said Rod Dir, CEO of  Spectrum Bridge, the company whose database is a key component of the  white spaces system approved by the FCC.
White spaces, for the uninitiated, are the spectrum spots in between  TV channels. Like the 2.4GHZ spectrum used by several flavors of Wi-Fi,  the white spaces are unlicensed spectrum, meaning any device that agrees  to play nice with others and gains regulatory approval can operate in  the frequency. Devices that are approved to operate in the white spaces  spectrum are required to check in with a database to see which channels  are available. (For more, check out AllThingsD’s handy FAQ post from last week.)
Over time, analysts imagine a range of wireless and wired devices  that can use the white spaces as a sort of “Super Wi-Fi” that can  operate over greater distance and perform better indoors.

Rural Broadband Could Fill Those White Spaces - Ina Fried - News - AllThingsD

On the one hand, the decision by the Federal Communications Commission last week to approve the first devices to run in the “white spaces” between television channels was a modest one.

The decision initially covers only one product, and is limited to the pilot city of Wilmington, N.C.

But backers of the technology hope those white spaces prove as big a boost to innovation as the unlicensed spectrum that gave birth to Wi-Fi.

“We see this as a multibillion-dollar industry,” said Rod Dir, CEO of Spectrum Bridge, the company whose database is a key component of the white spaces system approved by the FCC.

White spaces, for the uninitiated, are the spectrum spots in between TV channels. Like the 2.4GHZ spectrum used by several flavors of Wi-Fi, the white spaces are unlicensed spectrum, meaning any device that agrees to play nice with others and gains regulatory approval can operate in the frequency. Devices that are approved to operate in the white spaces spectrum are required to check in with a database to see which channels are available. (For more, check out AllThingsD’s handy FAQ post from last week.)

Over time, analysts imagine a range of wireless and wired devices that can use the white spaces as a sort of “Super Wi-Fi” that can operate over greater distance and perform better indoors.