Dear Nate Silver:
My name is Emma Gertlowitz and I’m eleven years old and for a million years I liked Justin Bieber because he was so cute but now I like you. I watched you on MSNBC and HBO and on “Charlie Rose” and I can’t stop thinking about how you study polls and create probability models and predict elections and how you’re always right, which I think is so unbelievably cute, and I keep imagining you saying to me, “Emma, I think that there’s a 93.7% chance of me falling in love with you…”

Read “A Date with Nate,” one girl’s love letter to Nate Silver, by Paul Rudnick

(via newyorker)

(via newyorker)

simplystatistics:

Interview with Rebecca Nugent of Carnegie Mellon University.

In this episode Jeff and I talk with Rebecca Nugent, Associate Teaching Professor in the Department of Statistics at Carnegie Mellon University. We talk with her about her work with the Census and the growing interest in statistics among undergraduates.

Josette Rigsby reports that a recent Jaspersoft study supports the general consensus that there is currently a major lack of skilled Data Scientists. She writes, “Business intelligence platform provider Jaspersoft has released a new survey that examines how companies across the globe are using big data analytics. Although many studies indicate the challenge of managing rapidly growing data volumes paralyzes many companies into inaction, Jaspersoft’s research tells a different story. The data shows 62 percent of respondents plan to implement big data solutions in the next twelve months. Jaspersoft’s new big data survey includes 631 respondents from the company’s user community. The survey includes respondents from more than fifteen countries that are primarily employed by companies with less than US$ 10M in revenue (30 percent).”

What Happens When Everything’s Measured? | ReadWriteWeb
Anything that can be measured can be optimized, and sometimes that  optimization can lead to competitive advantage in inefficient markets.    That’s the lesson of the book and popular new movie Moneyball,  about the Oakland A’s baseball team and its use of statistics to  overcome the limitations of its budget.  It’s a seductive proposition.
What if everything were run like that, though?  What if measurement  and optimization were the fundamental strategic approach brought to bear  on all kinds of endeavors?  That may be exactly what’s happening with  the rise of what’s called The Internet of Things, the emerging network  of web connected streets, buildings, sensors, objects and devices  expected to dominate the Internet in coming decades.  But the same  approach is also being taken with regard to some of our most fundamental  human activities: growing up, healing our bodies and spending time  alone.  Three examples in particular help shed some light on the good  sides and the bad sides of a Web that would make all things measurable  and subject to optimization.

What Happens When Everything’s Measured? | ReadWriteWeb

Anything that can be measured can be optimized, and sometimes that optimization can lead to competitive advantage in inefficient markets. That’s the lesson of the book and popular new movie Moneyball, about the Oakland A’s baseball team and its use of statistics to overcome the limitations of its budget. It’s a seductive proposition.

What if everything were run like that, though? What if measurement and optimization were the fundamental strategic approach brought to bear on all kinds of endeavors? That may be exactly what’s happening with the rise of what’s called The Internet of Things, the emerging network of web connected streets, buildings, sensors, objects and devices expected to dominate the Internet in coming decades. But the same approach is also being taken with regard to some of our most fundamental human activities: growing up, healing our bodies and spending time alone. Three examples in particular help shed some light on the good sides and the bad sides of a Web that would make all things measurable and subject to optimization.

CrashStat Steers Pedestrians, Bikers Away From Dangerous Intersections | Fast Company
You probably have some idea of the most dangerous intersections in  your neighborhood—maybe one street is legendary for being perilous to  cyclists, and maybe another is known as a dicey place for pedestrians to  cross. But in big cities, not every dangerous intersection is obvious.  Hence the need for CrashStat, a site that maps the scariest intersections in New York City.
The site, a project of Transportation Alternatives,  relies on data from the New York State Department of Transportation,  which has data for every crash involving a cyclist or pedestrian dating  back to 1995. The site allows users to search for crashes by an array of  factors—location, crash details (pedestrian or cyclist injuries and  fatalities), age, sex, what kind of motorist was involved, and  contributing factors (i.e. driver illness, unsafe speed, and driver  inexperience).

CrashStat Steers Pedestrians, Bikers Away From Dangerous Intersections | Fast Company

You probably have some idea of the most dangerous intersections in your neighborhood—maybe one street is legendary for being perilous to cyclists, and maybe another is known as a dicey place for pedestrians to cross. But in big cities, not every dangerous intersection is obvious. Hence the need for CrashStat, a site that maps the scariest intersections in New York City.

The site, a project of Transportation Alternatives, relies on data from the New York State Department of Transportation, which has data for every crash involving a cyclist or pedestrian dating back to 1995. The site allows users to search for crashes by an array of factors—location, crash details (pedestrian or cyclist injuries and fatalities), age, sex, what kind of motorist was involved, and contributing factors (i.e. driver illness, unsafe speed, and driver inexperience).

Business Schools Plan Leap Into Data - WSJ.com
Faced with an increasing stream of data from the Web and other electronic sources, many companies are seeking managers who can make sense of the numbers through the growing practice of data analytics, also known as business intelligence. Finding qualified candidates has proven difficult, but business schools hope to fill the talent gap.
This fall several schools, including Fordham University’s Graduate School of Business and Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business, are unveiling analytics electives, certificates and degree programs; other courses and programs were launched in the previous school year.
International Business Machines Corp., which has invested more than $14 billion buying analytics industry companies such as Coremetrics and Netezza Corp. since 2005, has teamed up with more than 200 schools, including Fordham, to develop analytics curriculum and training.
"The more students that graduate knowledgeable in areas we care about, the better it is not just for our company but the companies we work with," said Steve Mills, IBM senior vice president and group executive of software and systems. "It really comes down to what clients and customers need most."
Data analytics was once considered the purview of math, science and information-technology specialists. Now barraged with data from the Web and other sources, companies want employees who can both sift through the information and help solve business problems or strategize. For example, luxury fashion company Elie Tahari Ltd. uses analytics to examine historical buying patterns and predict future clothing purchases. Northeastern pizza chain Papa Gino’s Inc. uses analytics to examine the use of its loyalty program and has succeeded in boosting the average customer’s online order size.

Business Schools Plan Leap Into Data - WSJ.com

Faced with an increasing stream of data from the Web and other electronic sources, many companies are seeking managers who can make sense of the numbers through the growing practice of data analytics, also known as business intelligence. Finding qualified candidates has proven difficult, but business schools hope to fill the talent gap.

This fall several schools, including Fordham University’s Graduate School of Business and Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business, are unveiling analytics electives, certificates and degree programs; other courses and programs were launched in the previous school year.

International Business Machines Corp., which has invested more than $14 billion buying analytics industry companies such as Coremetrics and Netezza Corp. since 2005, has teamed up with more than 200 schools, including Fordham, to develop analytics curriculum and training.

"The more students that graduate knowledgeable in areas we care about, the better it is not just for our company but the companies we work with," said Steve Mills, IBM senior vice president and group executive of software and systems. "It really comes down to what clients and customers need most."

Data analytics was once considered the purview of math, science and information-technology specialists. Now barraged with data from the Web and other sources, companies want employees who can both sift through the information and help solve business problems or strategize. For example, luxury fashion company Elie Tahari Ltd. uses analytics to examine historical buying patterns and predict future clothing purchases. Northeastern pizza chain Papa Gino’s Inc. uses analytics to examine the use of its loyalty program and has succeeded in boosting the average customer’s online order size.

Freakonomics is available on Netflix to watch instantly
Source: Flowing Data
FYI: Freakonomics, the Movie is available to watch instantly on Netflix right now. It is of course based on the highly recommended first book by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner. I just watched it last night, and  it’s not as good as the book, but still an interesting watch. If  anything, it’s worth watching just to see Levitt talk about data. The  exchange between Levitt and Dubner is also pretty entertaining.

Freakonomics is available on Netflix to watch instantly

Source: Flowing Data

FYI: Freakonomics, the Movie is available to watch instantly on Netflix right now. It is of course based on the highly recommended first book by Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner. I just watched it last night, and it’s not as good as the book, but still an interesting watch. If anything, it’s worth watching just to see Levitt talk about data. The exchange between Levitt and Dubner is also pretty entertaining.