HGST’s Nanotechnology Printing Breakthrough Is Great News For Data Center Storage And HDD Capacity | TechCrunch

HGST-1.2Tbit-cropped-2013SPIE[4]

If you’re at all familiar with mobile processors, you’ve likely heard a lot about 32nm vs. 28nm construction when comparing the current generation of chips from companies like Qualcomm and others. That refers to the size of the processor, where a smaller number is better in terms of power consumption, fitting more transistors in less space for more efficient processing.

Currently, it’s hard to get past around the 20nm when creating individual patterns for data storage on today’s disk drives, which is another area in addition to processors where Moore’s Law applies. Today though, HGST, a Western Digital Company, announced a breakthrough that allows it to produce patterns as small as 10nm, via a process called “nanolithography,” meaning that it can essentially double the current maximum storage capacity possible in hard disk drives, given the same-sized final product.

Thermo-Chemical Solar Energy is Indefinitely Storable, Efficient | Inhabitat - Green Design Will Save the World
A new process developed by MIT researchers uses a molecular structure reconfiguration to capture energy from the sun and potentially storing it forever.  

Thermo-Chemical Solar Energy is Indefinitely Storable, Efficient | Inhabitat - Green Design Will Save the World

A new process developed by MIT researchers uses a molecular structure reconfiguration to capture energy from the sun and potentially storing it forever.  

IBM Research: Watch the Almaden Institute Live on August 26
Wednesday, August 26, 2009
Live Stream Agenda:
11:00 - 11:10 am ET: Opening Remarks, Josephine Cheng, IBM Fellow and Vice President Almaden Research Center
11:10 - 11:30 am ET: Why Energy Storage Matters, Winfried Wilcke, IBM, Conference Chairman
11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET: Surviving Two Billion Cars: The Urgent Need to Transform Vehicles, Fuels, and Mobility around the Globe, Daniel Sperling, Author, Two Billion Cars
1:00 - 1:50 pm ET: Energy, Emissions, and Transportation: A Look into the Future, Burton Richter, Stanford, Nobel Laureate
1:50 - 2:40 pm ET: The Importance of Energy Storage in Automotive Applications, Ted Miller, Sr. Manager, Ford Research
Watch it here starting at 11 am ET on Wednesday, August 26:

IBM Research: Watch the Almaden Institute Live on August 26

Wednesday, August 26, 2009

Live Stream Agenda:

11:00 - 11:10 am ET: Opening Remarks, Josephine Cheng, IBM Fellow and Vice President Almaden Research Center

11:10 - 11:30 am ET: Why Energy Storage Matters, Winfried Wilcke, IBM, Conference Chairman

11:30 am - 12:30 pm ET: Surviving Two Billion Cars: The Urgent Need to Transform Vehicles, Fuels, and Mobility around the Globe, Daniel Sperling, Author, Two Billion Cars

1:00 - 1:50 pm ET: Energy, Emissions, and Transportation: A Look into the Future, Burton Richter, Stanford, Nobel Laureate

1:50 - 2:40 pm ET: The Importance of Energy Storage in Automotive Applications, Ted Miller, Sr. Manager, Ford Research

Watch it here starting at 11 am ET on Wednesday, August 26:

This video shows an iron nanoparticle shuttle moving through a carbon nanotube in the presence of a low voltage electrical current. The shuttles position inside the tube can function as a high-density nonvolatile memory element.
(Courtesy of /Zettl Research Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California at Berkeley)/

Ultra-dense billion year memory chip (via BerkeleyLab)

science:

This is what 13,500 pages micro-etched into nickel looks like. The Rosetta Disk is “intended to be a durable archive of human languages, as well as an aesthetic object that suggests a journey of the imagination across culture and history.”

The Disk surface shown here, meant to be a guide to the contents, is etched with a central image of the earth and a message written in eight major world languages: “Languages of the World: This is an archive of over 1,500 human languages assembled in the year 02008 C.E. Magnify 1,000 times to find over 13,000 pages of language documentation.” The text begins at eye-readable scale and spirals down to nano-scale. This tapered ring of languages is intended to maximize the number of people that will be able to read something immediately upon picking up the Disk, as well as implying the directions for using it—‘get a magnifier and there is more.’
On the reverse side of the disk from the globe graphic are over 13,000 microetched pages of language documentation. Since each page is a physical rather than digital image, there is no platform or format dependency. Reading the Disk requires only optical magnification. Each page is .019 inches, or half a millimeter, across. This is about equal in width to 5 human hairs, and can be read with a 650X microscope (individual pages are clearly visible with 100X magnification).

science:

This is what 13,500 pages micro-etched into nickel looks like. The Rosetta Disk is “intended to be a durable archive of human languages, as well as an aesthetic object that suggests a journey of the imagination across culture and history.”

The Disk surface shown here, meant to be a guide to the contents, is etched with a central image of the earth and a message written in eight major world languages: “Languages of the World: This is an archive of over 1,500 human languages assembled in the year 02008 C.E. Magnify 1,000 times to find over 13,000 pages of language documentation.” The text begins at eye-readable scale and spirals down to nano-scale. This tapered ring of languages is intended to maximize the number of people that will be able to read something immediately upon picking up the Disk, as well as implying the directions for using it—‘get a magnifier and there is more.’

On the reverse side of the disk from the globe graphic are over 13,000 microetched pages of language documentation. Since each page is a physical rather than digital image, there is no platform or format dependency. Reading the Disk requires only optical magnification. Each page is .019 inches, or half a millimeter, across. This is about equal in width to 5 human hairs, and can be read with a 650X microscope (individual pages are clearly visible with 100X magnification).