A city is really just made up of a myriad of micro-cities. To make an entire city smarter, you have to start on these smaller systems first.
The 2012 National Football League season is in full swing. And, each week flocks of fans head to stadiums around the country to cheer (or boo) for the home team—about 80,000 people per stadium.
The unique challenge of stadiums, which are practically cities unto themselves, is the management of intensely complex infrastructures that provide food, water, medical facilities, climate, and even traffic control. All this may require pinpointing exact locations or managing operations across tens, hundreds, or even thousands of miles.
By using information in new and creative ways, organizations can better manage these sprawling environments.
What’s becoming increasingly prevalent in the creation of these “mini-cities” is requiring innovative technology to make them a microcosm of a smarter city where information is used to deliver services effectively and efficiently. By using information in new and creative ways, organizations can better manage these sprawling environments, and teach us lessons about how to make our cities smarter.
People are Sensors
Let’s put these organizations with massively complex facilities in context. Look at the top 25 most populated cities in the United States, and you’ll see Boston, Seattle and Nashville on the list. Yet, all of these cities are less populated and occupy fewer square miles of land than the Los Angeles Unified School District.
With 14,000 buildings that cover more than 710 square miles for its 700,000 students, the district is so vast, it mimics an actual city’s infrastructure considering their use of natural resources and the complexity of operations. To help manage this vast school system, the L.A. schools are empowering its “citizens”—the thousands of students, teachers and staff—to act as living sensors to identify faulty or dangerous infrastructure, such as broken windows, doors or railings, and then sending these images or text messages from their smartphones.

A city is really just made up of a myriad of micro-cities. To make an entire city smarter, you have to start on these smaller systems first.

The 2012 National Football League season is in full swing. And, each week flocks of fans head to stadiums around the country to cheer (or boo) for the home team—about 80,000 people per stadium.

The unique challenge of stadiums, which are practically cities unto themselves, is the management of intensely complex infrastructures that provide food, water, medical facilities, climate, and even traffic control. All this may require pinpointing exact locations or managing operations across tens, hundreds, or even thousands of miles.

By using information in new and creative ways, organizations can better manage these sprawling environments.

What’s becoming increasingly prevalent in the creation of these “mini-cities” is requiring innovative technology to make them a microcosm of a smarter city where information is used to deliver services effectively and efficiently. By using information in new and creative ways, organizations can better manage these sprawling environments, and teach us lessons about how to make our cities smarter.

People are Sensors

Let’s put these organizations with massively complex facilities in context. Look at the top 25 most populated cities in the United States, and you’ll see Boston, Seattle and Nashville on the list. Yet, all of these cities are less populated and occupy fewer square miles of land than the Los Angeles Unified School District.

With 14,000 buildings that cover more than 710 square miles for its 700,000 students, the district is so vast, it mimics an actual city’s infrastructure considering their use of natural resources and the complexity of operations. To help manage this vast school system, the L.A. schools are empowering its “citizens”—the thousands of students, teachers and staff—to act as living sensors to identify faulty or dangerous infrastructure, such as broken windows, doors or railings, and then sending these images or text messages from their smartphones.

(via smartercities)

IBM Helps Companies Build Intelligence into Products to Meet Customer Demands On A Smarter Planet

The products are talking, but no one is listening. IBMers explain how software can help connect different physical products into an interconnected infrastructure we call the smarter planet.

food+tech connect | promoting a networked food system
Created by shiftN, this map visualizes the global interconnections among food, agriculture, water, energy, soil, and humans that comprise our food system.
What fascinates me about this map is how I discovered it and how that  process demonstrates an opportunity for information technology to  connect us with the information, people, and resources necessary to  address pressing global food and environmental challenges. I stumbled  upon this graphic in a presentation from the Workshop on Skills and Translation of Agri-Food Research in the UK, which I located through a Google search for open agricultural research in the UK.  In effect, Google enabled me to quickly and effortlessly discover that  the open agriculture conversation is already underway across the ocean.
What about this graphic interests you?
- Danielle Gould

food+tech connect | promoting a networked food system

Created by shiftN, this map visualizes the global interconnections among food, agriculture, water, energy, soil, and humans that comprise our food system.

What fascinates me about this map is how I discovered it and how that process demonstrates an opportunity for information technology to connect us with the information, people, and resources necessary to address pressing global food and environmental challenges. I stumbled upon this graphic in a presentation from the Workshop on Skills and Translation of Agri-Food Research in the UK, which I located through a Google search for open agricultural research in the UK. In effect, Google enabled me to quickly and effortlessly discover that the open agriculture conversation is already underway across the ocean.

What about this graphic interests you?

- Danielle Gould

The Internet of Things (via IBMSocialMedia)

Video featuring, from IBM: Mike Wing, Andy Stanford-Clark and John Tolva.

Over the past century but accelerating over the past couple of decades, we have seen the emergence of a kind of global data field. The planet itself - natural systems, human systems, physical objects - have always generated an enormous amount of data, but we didnt used to be able to hear it, to see it, to capture it. Now we can because all of this stuff is now instrumented. And its all interconnected, so now we can actually have access to it. So, in effect, the planet has grown a central nervous system.