Could Minuum finally evolve the virtual QWERTY keyboard? | Crave - CNET
Did you know the QWERTY layout originated in the 1870s? It might be time for a makeover. The up-and-coming Minuum virtual keyboard minimizes the de facto standard into something far sleeker and sexier.
When in use, a virtual keyboard shouldn’t take up half of your smartphone or tablet screen, but it does, and it sure is ugly. If you’re tired of keys hogging up precious screen space, check out Minuum — a simple, yet intelligent single-row reinvention of the QWERTY layout.
Simply put, the Minuum keyboard, which is gaining traction on crowdfunding Web site Indiegogo, seems attractive as it doesn’t require much space to use. It intelligently predicts what word you’re going for through auto-correction algorithms, similar to a full-size virtual keyboard.

Could Minuum finally evolve the virtual QWERTY keyboard? | Crave - CNET

Did you know the QWERTY layout originated in the 1870s? It might be time for a makeover. The up-and-coming Minuum virtual keyboard minimizes the de facto standard into something far sleeker and sexier.

When in use, a virtual keyboard shouldn’t take up half of your smartphone or tablet screen, but it does, and it sure is ugly. If you’re tired of keys hogging up precious screen space, check out Minuum — a simple, yet intelligent single-row reinvention of the QWERTY layout.

Simply put, the Minuum keyboard, which is gaining traction on crowdfunding Web site Indiegogo, seems attractive as it doesn’t require much space to use. It intelligently predicts what word you’re going for through auto-correction algorithms, similar to a full-size virtual keyboard.

In the Coming Age of the Connected Home, Your Phone Will Be a Magic Wand |  Wired.com
Your smartphone is going domestic. In the age of the connected home, your mobile devices are becoming the central command, the brains, if you will, of the entire smarthome experience.
It makes sense. Rather than remote controls with menus to memorize and knobs, dials and switches to manipulate, your smartphone or tablet becomes one remote to rule them all. You’ve always got it with you when you’re out and about, it’s never far from hand when you’re sitting on the couch and it’s dead-simple to use.
What we’re seeing started with the birth of the smartphone, when gadgetmakers realized smartphone integration could add tremendous value to consumers’ product experiences. It started with simple apps that transform your phone into a remote control for a DVR or set-top box, letting you use a touchscreen to navigate complex user interfaces. It grew with apps that tie into our home security systems and, more recently, our appliances. Remembering if the milk in your fridge is past its prime or whether you have recipes based on the things in your freezer was once the stuff of The Jetsons, but is increasingly commonplace today.

In the Coming Age of the Connected Home, Your Phone Will Be a Magic Wand |  Wired.com

Your smartphone is going domestic. In the age of the connected home, your mobile devices are becoming the central command, the brains, if you will, of the entire smarthome experience.

It makes sense. Rather than remote controls with menus to memorize and knobs, dials and switches to manipulate, your smartphone or tablet becomes one remote to rule them all. You’ve always got it with you when you’re out and about, it’s never far from hand when you’re sitting on the couch and it’s dead-simple to use.

What we’re seeing started with the birth of the smartphone, when gadgetmakers realized smartphone integration could add tremendous value to consumers’ product experiences. It started with simple apps that transform your phone into a remote control for a DVR or set-top box, letting you use a touchscreen to navigate complex user interfaces. It grew with apps that tie into our home security systems and, more recently, our appliances. Remembering if the milk in your fridge is past its prime or whether you have recipes based on the things in your freezer was once the stuff of The Jetsons, but is increasingly commonplace today.

ReadWrite – Ubislate 7Ci: Can This $20 Tablet Really Change The World?
In all the competitive battles that have defined the history of the technology revolution, one essential truth almost always determines the outcome: cheap and good enough beats awesome but expensive every time.
It happened when PCs beat out minicomputers (not to mention Macintosh’s). It happened when VHS killed Betamax. It happened when Linux pushed aside proprietary server operating systems. It’s happening now as Google’s Android overtakes Apple’s iOS.
Good Enough?
And it could be about to happen again with the Ubislate 7Ci tablet. This Android device is far from special in just about every respect. The specs are ordinary at best:
7-inch, 800 x 432 capacitive touchscreen
Android 4.04 Ice Cream Sandwich
1GHz Cortex A8 ARMv7 CPU
512MB RAM, 4GB storage
Wi-Fi (a version with GPRS cellular capability is also available)
VGA front-facing camera
Micro SD slot
Power, micro-USB, and headphone connectors
The speaker is tinny. The pictures are grainy and low-res, and the colors are off, too. The screen has to be held just so to be seen properly. Battery life is listed as a measly 3 hours, and in my tests the device couldn’t hold a charge more than a day or two no matter how little it was used. Performance is painfully slow for anyone spoiled by the latest tablets from Apple, Samsung, Microsoft and others. Things that should happen instantly take several seconds or more, and I experienced frequent hangups and glitches. 
But build quality seems solid, and the thing is perfectly portable. Most important, though, it works - and it’s being sold for just $20 in India.

ReadWrite – Ubislate 7Ci: Can This $20 Tablet Really Change The World?

In all the competitive battles that have defined the history of the technology revolution, one essential truth almost always determines the outcome: cheap and good enough beats awesome but expensive every time.

It happened when PCs beat out minicomputers (not to mention Macintosh’s). It happened when VHS killed Betamax. It happened when Linux pushed aside proprietary server operating systems. It’s happening now as Google’s Android overtakes Apple’s iOS.

Good Enough?

And it could be about to happen again with the Ubislate 7Ci tablet. This Android device is far from special in just about every respect. The specs are ordinary at best:

  • 7-inch, 800 x 432 capacitive touchscreen
  • Android 4.04 Ice Cream Sandwich
  • 1GHz Cortex A8 ARMv7 CPU
  • 512MB RAM, 4GB storage
  • Wi-Fi (a version with GPRS cellular capability is also available)
  • VGA front-facing camera
  • Micro SD slot
  • Power, micro-USB, and headphone connectors

The speaker is tinny. The pictures are grainy and low-res, and the colors are off, too. The screen has to be held just so to be seen properly. Battery life is listed as a measly 3 hours, and in my tests the device couldn’t hold a charge more than a day or two no matter how little it was used. Performance is painfully slow for anyone spoiled by the latest tablets from Apple, Samsung, Microsoft and others. Things that should happen instantly take several seconds or more, and I experienced frequent hangups and glitches. 

But build quality seems solid, and the thing is perfectly portable. Most important, though, it works - and it’s being sold for just $20 in India.


The Smarter Planet app (version 3.0) integrates content from many spheres of IBM’s Smarter Planet initiative: our blog, Tumblr sites, YouTube, ibm.com, Facebook, Twitter and more.

Our goal is to help people understand how the world’s systems — from cities and buildings to the energy grid, transportation networks, the delivery of healthcare and the food supply chain — are becoming more instrumented, interconnected and intelligent through the application of new business analytics and information technology innovations.

Let’s build a smarter planet together.

India’s sub-$50 Android tablet claims 1.4 million orders in two weeks — Engadget
How popular is the world cheapest tablet? Pretty darn popular, it seems. The Aakash has already notched up 1.4 million bookings since going up for sale on  December 14th, not massively surprising given the $41 (2,500 rupee)  price tag. An upgraded version is already planned for March, with three  new factories planned to each produce 75,000 new units per month. If a  sub-$50 tablet is still too expensive for your tastes, then you may be happy to hear that the price should still sink as low as $35 and could even be pushed as low as $10. At that price, we’ll take five.
Physorg

India’s sub-$50 Android tablet claims 1.4 million orders in two weeks — Engadget

How popular is the world cheapest tablet? Pretty darn popular, it seems. The Aakash has already notched up 1.4 million bookings since going up for sale on December 14th, not massively surprising given the $41 (2,500 rupee) price tag. An upgraded version is already planned for March, with three new factories planned to each produce 75,000 new units per month. If a sub-$50 tablet is still too expensive for your tastes, then you may be happy to hear that the price should still sink as low as $35 and could even be pushed as low as $10. At that price, we’ll take five.

Physorg

Of all the announcements from Amazon today, the most audacious one is the one that involves Silk, a hybrid browser that essentially pre-fetches the web, caches it and then serves it up to Fire owners. I was pretty intrigued by it the moment I read about it. It reminded me of Skyfire. However, it was later when reading this post by Chris Espinosa, I realized the implications of it:

MEMS Boom Following Tablet, Smartphone Mania
Source: Technology for Change
Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) chips, used  as sensors and actuators, are riding the wave of exploding touch-screen  tablet and smartphone sales, promising record earnings in 2011 and  beyond.

Accelerometers, gyroscopes, oscillators, acoustic-wave filters, digital microphones, digital speakers, and a dozen other microscopic sensors and actuators are micro-miniaturizing the final frontier in consumer electronics. This is driving the sales of once off-beat MEMS applications into the mainstream.
The Nintendo Wii started the MEMS consumer revolution by using electro-mechanical devices downsized with semiconductor fabrication techniques into tiny mechanisms for tracking the actions of their users. Now every major game-console maker, from Sony’s Move to Xbox’s Kinect, uses MEMS chips to track motion and interpret user gestures. Next came Apple’s iPhone, which first adopted MEMS accelerometers for auto-switching between portrait and landscape orientations. It later used them for gyroscopes to enable accurate pointing and dead reckoning for location-based services.
Now touch-screen tablets are adopting the whole gamut of MEMS chips, adding 3D gesture recognition as well as all the pointing and location-based capabilities of gaming consoles and mobile phones. This is opening a new MEMS market that IHS’ iSuppli claims will top $140.4 million this year, up 373 percent from a mere $29.7 million for tablet-bound MEMS chips in 2010. By 2014, iSuppli predicts that MEMS sensors for touch-screen tablets will top $280 million, second only to mobile phones in total revenue.

MEMS Boom Following Tablet, Smartphone Mania

Source: Technology for Change

  • Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) chips, used as sensors and actuators, are riding the wave of exploding touch-screen tablet and smartphone sales, promising record earnings in 2011 and beyond.
  • Accelerometers, gyroscopes, oscillators, acoustic-wave filters, digital microphones, digital speakers, and a dozen other microscopic sensors and actuators are micro-miniaturizing the final frontier in consumer electronics. This is driving the sales of once off-beat MEMS applications into the mainstream.

    The Nintendo Wii started the MEMS consumer revolution by using electro-mechanical devices downsized with semiconductor fabrication techniques into tiny mechanisms for tracking the actions of their users. Now every major game-console maker, from Sony’s Move to Xbox’s Kinect, uses MEMS chips to track motion and interpret user gestures. Next came Apple’s iPhone, which first adopted MEMS accelerometers for auto-switching between portrait and landscape orientations. It later used them for gyroscopes to enable accurate pointing and dead reckoning for location-based services.

    Now touch-screen tablets are adopting the whole gamut of MEMS chips, adding 3D gesture recognition as well as all the pointing and location-based capabilities of gaming consoles and mobile phones. This is opening a new MEMS market that IHS’ iSuppli claims will top $140.4 million this year, up 373 percent from a mere $29.7 million for tablet-bound MEMS chips in 2010. By 2014, iSuppli predicts that MEMS sensors for touch-screen tablets will top $280 million, second only to mobile phones in total revenue.

iPad Drives Tablet Market to 17 Million Units Shipped in 2010

 

Source: Mashable

A new report from IDC shows that both the media tablet market and the e-reader market made big leaps in 2010. The market for media tablets grew from 3.3 million in Q2 to 4.8 million in Q3, an increase of 45.1%. That growth was fueled almost exclusively by the iPad. In Q3, Apple sold 4.19 million iPads, representing over 87% of the media tablet market.

IDC defines media tablets as devices larger than five inches and less than 14 inches running “lightweight operating systems,” primarily iOS and Android.

E-readers experienced rapid growth as well, led by the Amazon Kindle. 1.14 million Kindles were shipped in Q3, representing 41.5% of the e-reader market. Unexpectedly though, the Pandigital Novel (440 million) beat out the Barnes and Noble Nook (420 million) for second place.

The most interesting part of the report though was the overall forecasts for 2010, 2011 and 2012. For 2010, IDC predicts that about 17 million media tablets will be shipped (they’re still counting up the numbers), but that it will grow to a whopping 44.6 million in 2011 and 70.8 million in 2012. If devices like the iPad 2 and the Motorola Xoom succeed though, then IDC might have to revise its numbers.