Mobile and the rise of the smart buyer | GigaOM
27% of US smartphone users will use the device during in-store holiday shopping: A new Deloitte survey (Oct 26) of 5,000 U.S. consumers says of the 42% of consumers who own a smartphone, 27% will use the device while shopping for the holidays. 67% of these shoppers will use the devices to find store locations, 59% to compare prices, 46% to check product availability, 45% to shop at online stores, and 40% will scan bar codes.  

Mobile and the rise of the smart buyer | GigaOM

27% of US smartphone users will use the device during in-store holiday shopping: A new Deloitte survey (Oct 26) of 5,000 U.S. consumers says of the 42% of consumers who own a smartphone, 27% will use the device while shopping for the holidays. 67% of these shoppers will use the devices to find store locations, 59% to compare prices, 46% to check product availability, 45% to shop at online stores, and 40% will scan bar codes.  

The Tech That Will Prevent The Next Big Foodborne Illness Outbreak | Fast Company
By tracking every step of the food production process, the next time people start getting sick from cantaloupes, it will be much easier to find which farms are clean, and which are responsible.
Food contamination has been in the news recently, and for good reason; at this moment, people in the U.S. are still getting sick from cantaloupe tainted with listeria. Every year, there are over 76 million food-related illnesses. And at least some of them could be prevented if suppliers used more comprehensive tracking systems.
Case in point: Using technology from IBM and food safety-technology company N2N Global, fruit and vegetable co-op Cherry Central can look at a bottle of its juice and tell you what oranges went into it, when the oranges were harvested, where they were harvested, who harvested them, where they were located through the entire process, when they were transported, what transport vehicle was used, and who the oranges were sent to. All of the data can be viewed and analyzed in real-time, courtesy of IBM’s analytics capabilities.
Every time a food product is moved or touched by someone new, supply chain data can be updated via mobile phone with information about date, time, location, temperature, and food safety compliance.

The Tech That Will Prevent The Next Big Foodborne Illness Outbreak | Fast Company

By tracking every step of the food production process, the next time people start getting sick from cantaloupes, it will be much easier to find which farms are clean, and which are responsible.

Food contamination has been in the news recently, and for good reason; at this moment, people in the U.S. are still getting sick from cantaloupe tainted with listeria. Every year, there are over 76 million food-related illnesses. And at least some of them could be prevented if suppliers used more comprehensive tracking systems.

Case in point: Using technology from IBM and food safety-technology company N2N Global, fruit and vegetable co-op Cherry Central can look at a bottle of its juice and tell you what oranges went into it, when the oranges were harvested, where they were harvested, who harvested them, where they were located through the entire process, when they were transported, what transport vehicle was used, and who the oranges were sent to. All of the data can be viewed and analyzed in real-time, courtesy of IBM’s analytics capabilities.

Every time a food product is moved or touched by someone new, supply chain data can be updated via mobile phone with information about date, time, location, temperature, and food safety compliance.

Smart systems that combine microprocessor control, connectivity and a high-level operating system will grow from a $1 trillion market today to $2 trillion by 2015.

Smart Systems to Top $1 Trillion | Business Analytics | Smarter Technology

Smart systems are proliferating in nearly all fields. And their use covers quite a broad range, including smart household appliances, smartphone navigation apps, smart security apps that identify suspicious activity, and supercomputers that use artificial intelligence to give expert medical or legal advice.

Already there are 1.8 billion smart systems in service worldwide, cutting across every application area under the sun—from personal hygiene to public transportation—but that number will more than double to over 4 billion over the next five years.

Step into the Smarter Planet Time Machine!
For a little Friday Fun, try one of these three settings:
…One Week Ago
…One Month Ago
…One Year Ago
Or to really rev up your Flux Capacitor, try the Random button to sample one of the more than 3600 posts about All Things Smarter since we went back to the future in Nov. 2008.
Want to hold Smarter Planet in your hand? Get the mobile apps for iOS and Android.
Of course, you can always browse through the misty mountains of Smarter Time via the Archive. Or for a real time warp, scroll through all the Time Machine posts.

Step into the Smarter Planet Time Machine!

For a little Friday Fun, try one of these three settings:

Or to really rev up your Flux Capacitor, try the Random button to sample one of the more than 3600 posts about All Things Smarter since we went back to the future in Nov. 2008.

Want to hold Smarter Planet in your hand? Get the mobile apps for iOS and Android.

Of course, you can always browse through the misty mountains of Smarter Time via the Archive. Or for a real time warp, scroll through all the Time Machine posts.

Android Overtakes BlackBerry As the Top U.S. Smartphone Platform
Source: Mashable

The trend was obvious for quite some time, and now it finally happened: Android is the most popular smartphone platform among U.S. subscribers.
According to comScore’s data, Google’s Android rose from 23.5% market share in October 2010 to 31.2% in January 2011, enough to securely grab first place from RIM’s BlackBerry, which fell 35.8% in October 2010 to 30.4% in January 2011. A recent report from Nielsenalso claimed that Android is now the number one smartphone platform in the U.S., albeit with slightly different numbers.
Apple’s iOS experienced a minute growth in the same period: from 24.6% to 24.7%, while Microsoft and Palm continued losing market share, ending at 8.0% and 3.2%, respectively.

Android Overtakes BlackBerry As the Top U.S. Smartphone Platform

Source: Mashable

The trend was obvious for quite some time, and now it finally happened: Android is the most popular smartphone platform among U.S. subscribers.

According to comScore’s data, Google’s Android rose from 23.5% market share in October 2010 to 31.2% in January 2011, enough to securely grab first place from RIM’s BlackBerry, which fell 35.8% in October 2010 to 30.4% in January 2011. A recent report from Nielsenalso claimed that Android is now the number one smartphone platform in the U.S., albeit with slightly different numbers.

Apple’s iOS experienced a minute growth in the same period: from 24.6% to 24.7%, while Microsoft and Palm continued losing market share, ending at 8.0% and 3.2%, respectively.

Report Finds Connected Devices, Not Phones, Leading the Explosion in Mobile Wireless
Source: ReadWriteWeb
As Sharma observes, the mobile market crossed a number of important  thresholds in the last quarter of 2010.  Mobile subscriptions crossed  the 100% penetration mark, for example.  And smartphone shipments exceeded PC shipments for the first time.
But it’s important to note that these new mobile subscriptions aren’t  all phones.  In fact, the shape of the subscription market is changing  quite dramatically, with connected devices outpacing the growth of paid  and prepaid subscriptions quite dramatically.  Connected devices -  tablets, e-readers, and so on - are now 7% of subscriptions.  That  category isn’t simply the fastest growing; Sharma also predicts that  this will soon become the most profitable.  By the end of this year,  connected devices will command double digit market share.

Report Finds Connected Devices, Not Phones, Leading the Explosion in Mobile Wireless

Source: ReadWriteWeb

As Sharma observes, the mobile market crossed a number of important thresholds in the last quarter of 2010. Mobile subscriptions crossed the 100% penetration mark, for example. And smartphone shipments exceeded PC shipments for the first time.

But it’s important to note that these new mobile subscriptions aren’t all phones. In fact, the shape of the subscription market is changing quite dramatically, with connected devices outpacing the growth of paid and prepaid subscriptions quite dramatically. Connected devices - tablets, e-readers, and so on - are now 7% of subscriptions. That category isn’t simply the fastest growing; Sharma also predicts that this will soon become the most profitable. By the end of this year, connected devices will command double digit market share.

Android Phone Gets Driver Out of a Ticket
Source: Slashgear
College student Sahas Katta was able to beat his speeding ticket in traffic court using…drumroll please…his Android smartphone, and a handy app. Katta was pulled over and charged with going 40mph in a 25mph zone. But he wasn’t going 40, only 26mph. His word against the officer’s right? Not so much, since he was running My Tracks by Google in the background on his Motorola Droid phone.
The free app records and visualizes GPS data on a map, tracking distance, average speed, average moving speed, and max speed. Katta downloaded this information to Google Docs and brought it with him to the courtroom. He was able to convince the judge that the officer might not have been using his radar gun correctly, introducing enough reasonable doubt that he was declared “not guilty”. Nice!

Android Phone Gets Driver Out of a Ticket

Source: Slashgear

College student Sahas Katta was able to beat his speeding ticket in traffic court using…drumroll please…his Android smartphone, and a handy app. Katta was pulled over and charged with going 40mph in a 25mph zone. But he wasn’t going 40, only 26mph. His word against the officer’s right? Not so much, since he was running My Tracks by Google in the background on his Motorola Droid phone.

The free app records and visualizes GPS data on a map, tracking distance, average speed, average moving speed, and max speed. Katta downloaded this information to Google Docs and brought it with him to the courtroom. He was able to convince the judge that the officer might not have been using his radar gun correctly, introducing enough reasonable doubt that he was declared “not guilty”. Nice!

The Social Business | IBM for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad on the iTunes App Store
Building on the launch of the Smarter Planet iPhone app for iPhones, iPads and iPod Touch, our second app — The Social Business — is now available in the App Store. It focuses on the ways in which every facet of business — from training and product development to customer service and internal collaboration — is ripe for innovation and integration.
Of course, both Smarter Planet and The Social Business apps are available for Android phones, as well as other smartphones through our listings on GetJar.

The Social Business | IBM for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad on the iTunes App Store

Building on the launch of the Smarter Planet iPhone app for iPhones, iPads and iPod Touch, our second app — The Social Business — is now available in the App Store. It focuses on the ways in which every facet of business — from training and product development to customer service and internal collaboration — is ripe for innovation and integration.

Of course, both Smarter Planet and The Social Business apps are available for Android phones, as well as other smartphones through our listings on GetJar.

In addition to the iPhone app now available in the Apple App Store, and the Smarter Planet and The Social Business apps on the Android Market, you can text yourself a link to download the Smarter Planet app customized by GetJar for other phones such as Nokia (Symbian) Palm (WebOS) and 2,100 smartphone models.

Nanogenerators to Enable Battery-Free Handhelds
Source: Smarter technology
Energy harvesting today is confined to a few niche applications, such as powering wireless sensor networks in remote areas where it is too expensive to send out crews to constantly be replacing batteries. However, by nano-sizing the working element in these energy harvesters, Northwestern University researchers claim their efficiency can be improved enough to enable battery-free mobile electronics.
The most advanced semiconductor materials today are enabling advances in electronics that impact every segment of society—from consumer to IT. Gallium nitride (GaN), for instance, has enabled ultra-bright light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to replace automotive headlight filaments and Blu-ray drives to pack 50GB on a CD-sized disk. Now Northwestern University researchers claim that by nano-sizing gallium nitride and other piezoelectric semiconductors like zinc oxide (ZnO), their efficiency can be boosted by 20 to 100 times, thereby enabling battery-free electronic devices to enter the mainstream.
Piezoelectric materials, like GaN and ZnO, are structured as crystalline lattices of highly polarized molecules called dipoles where one end is positively charged and the other negatively charged. Whenever such a piezoelectric material is bent, or otherwise stressed, the distribution of these dipoles is reorganized, resulting in a momentary excess of charge that can be harvested as a current to drive electronic circuits. Since the deformation is usually cyclic—for instance, bending back and forth in sync with vibrations—the resulting voltage induces an alternating current. (This is in contrast to the direct current that comes from a battery.)

Nanogenerators to Enable Battery-Free Handhelds

Source: Smarter technology

Energy harvesting today is confined to a few niche applications, such as powering wireless sensor networks in remote areas where it is too expensive to send out crews to constantly be replacing batteries. However, by nano-sizing the working element in these energy harvesters, Northwestern University researchers claim their efficiency can be improved enough to enable battery-free mobile electronics.

The most advanced semiconductor materials today are enabling advances in electronics that impact every segment of society—from consumer to IT. Gallium nitride (GaN), for instance, has enabled ultra-bright light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to replace automotive headlight filaments and Blu-ray drives to pack 50GB on a CD-sized disk. Now Northwestern University researchers claim that by nano-sizing gallium nitride and other piezoelectric semiconductors like zinc oxide (ZnO), their efficiency can be boosted by 20 to 100 times, thereby enabling battery-free electronic devices to enter the mainstream.

Piezoelectric materials, like GaN and ZnO, are structured as crystalline lattices of highly polarized molecules called dipoles where one end is positively charged and the other negatively charged. Whenever such a piezoelectric material is bent, or otherwise stressed, the distribution of these dipoles is reorganized, resulting in a momentary excess of charge that can be harvested as a current to drive electronic circuits. Since the deformation is usually cyclic—for instance, bending back and forth in sync with vibrations—the resulting voltage induces an alternating current. (This is in contrast to the direct current that comes from a battery.)