Which-50: Nissan's Nismo offers a fascinating glimpse of how consumers will engage with the Internet of Things

Car manufacturer Nissan today announced its Nismo watch, a smart watch which measures a car’s performance, monitors the biometrics of the driver and the efficiency of their driving, and even links into a user’s social network feeds.

Observation Deck: What Happens When Cars Start Talking to Each Other? | Underwire | Wired.com

The cars: They will drive themselves. That’s pretty much a given at this point, thanks to artificial intelligence research at Stanford and elsewhere. And they’ll talk to each other, too — the processes that let our cars go fast and get to where we tell them won’t be centralized. There won’t be a control tower. Software will sort it out among itself.

Subaru’s double vision prevents accidents | The Car Tech blog - CNET
Subaru’s new EyeSight system, which will first be available on the 2013 Legacy and Outback, uses two cameras to monitor what is out in front of the car. These cameras use stereo processing to determine the distance of other cars or objects ahead. They also can recognize lane lines.
These sensors enable a whole raft of driver assistance features. Collision prevention and mitigation can hit the brakes if the cameras detect an imminent collision with a pedestrian, car, or object. Subaru says that at speeds under 19 mph, the system can brake the car quickly enough so as to avoid a collision. At greater speeds the automatic braking will reduce the impact.

Subaru’s double vision prevents accidents | The Car Tech blog - CNET

Subaru’s new EyeSight system, which will first be available on the 2013 Legacy and Outback, uses two cameras to monitor what is out in front of the car. These cameras use stereo processing to determine the distance of other cars or objects ahead. They also can recognize lane lines.

These sensors enable a whole raft of driver assistance features. Collision prevention and mitigation can hit the brakes if the cameras detect an imminent collision with a pedestrian, car, or object. Subaru says that at speeds under 19 mph, the system can brake the car quickly enough so as to avoid a collision. At greater speeds the automatic braking will reduce the impact.

Connected Cars: How to Accelerate Mainstream Adoption | Mashable
Every so often, the media tells us about an automotive manufacturer  on the cusp of delivering wireless, cooperative systems. The reader  immediately thinks of Knight Rider, and wanders through a fantasy of connected car heaven.
However, this type of news is often miles from accurate; connected  car offerings in the near-to-distant future are a different reality.  This article examines the delays behind that “nearly done” automotive  technology, and analyzes the value of our research dollars.
In 2005, several automakers introduced cooperative, wireless systems at the Intelligent Transportation Society World Congress in the parking lot of the San Francisco Giants’s then SBC Park. Messages were sent vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure via dedicated short-range communications (DSRC) or, as it would later be renamed, “IEEE 802.11p (5.9 GHz).”
Most of the applications were safety-related systems that offered a  seemingly futuristic understanding of position, speed and road  conditions. But that was six long years ago – so, what has changed?  Apart from the Giants stadium name-change, not much. Technology is no  closer to the marketplace. Let’s explore why.

Connected Cars: How to Accelerate Mainstream Adoption | Mashable

Every so often, the media tells us about an automotive manufacturer on the cusp of delivering wireless, cooperative systems. The reader immediately thinks of Knight Rider, and wanders through a fantasy of connected car heaven.

However, this type of news is often miles from accurate; connected car offerings in the near-to-distant future are a different reality. This article examines the delays behind that “nearly done” automotive technology, and analyzes the value of our research dollars.

In 2005, several automakers introduced cooperative, wireless systems at the Intelligent Transportation Society World Congress in the parking lot of the San Francisco Giants’s then SBC Park. Messages were sent vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure via dedicated short-range communications (DSRC) or, as it would later be renamed, “IEEE 802.11p (5.9 GHz).”

Most of the applications were safety-related systems that offered a seemingly futuristic understanding of position, speed and road conditions. But that was six long years ago – so, what has changed? Apart from the Giants stadium name-change, not much. Technology is no closer to the marketplace. Let’s explore why.

MyFord Mobile App Keeps Tabs on Your (Future) Car | Mac|Life
Wish you could control your automobile from your smartphone? Yes, now there’s finally an app for that, assuming your car is from Ford and it’s one of the latest and greatest electric models that haven’t even been officially announced yet. Engadget is reporting that auto maker Ford is planning to release an app for iOS, Android and Blackberry called MyFord Mobile. Like similar apps already available for the Nissan Leaf and Chevy Volt, MyFord Mobile will check your “car’s charging status from afar and deliver some climate settings to ensure that the car is properly hot or cold before you leave on your hot or cold commute.”  

MyFord Mobile App Keeps Tabs on Your (Future) Car | Mac|Life

Wish you could control your automobile from your smartphone? Yes, now there’s finally an app for that, assuming your car is from Ford and it’s one of the latest and greatest electric models that haven’t even been officially announced yet. Engadget is reporting that auto maker Ford is planning to release an app for iOS, Android and Blackberry called MyFord Mobile. Like similar apps already available for the Nissan Leaf and Chevy Volt, MyFord Mobile will check your “car’s charging status from afar and deliver some climate settings to ensure that the car is properly hot or cold before you leave on your hot or cold commute.”  

BMW adopts Nvidia GPU for in-car displays - CES 2011 CNET Blogs
After dominating PC graphics, Nvidia set its sights on other industries, most recently getting into the automotive sector, powering navigation system graphics in Audi cars. Now Nvidia announces a partnership with BMW to power the graphics in all of its infotainment systems. In Audi navigation systems, the Nvidia GPU allows rich 3D building and landscape rendering. BMW’s current high-end navigation systems also employ rich 3D maps, but the Nvidia GPU should improve rendering speed. Nvidia says its GPU will enable 1280x600 resolution graphics in BMW’s next generation infotainment system. 

BMW adopts Nvidia GPU for in-car displays - CES 2011 CNET Blogs

After dominating PC graphics, Nvidia set its sights on other industries, most recently getting into the automotive sector, powering navigation system graphics in Audi cars. Now Nvidia announces a partnership with BMW to power the graphics in all of its infotainment systems. In Audi navigation systems, the Nvidia GPU allows rich 3D building and landscape rendering. BMW’s current high-end navigation systems also employ rich 3D maps, but the Nvidia GPU should improve rendering speed. Nvidia says its GPU will enable 1280x600 resolution graphics in BMW’s next generation infotainment system. 

Watch live streaming video from newintelligence at livestream.com

Automotive 2.0 vPanel | New Models for Mobility on IBM Global Business Services Livestream Channel

Catch the on demand replay of our latest webcam-based interactive webcast on the new frontier for smarter transportation.

 

In the last 1.0 hundred years mobility was largely about automobile ownership.  The conversation now moves to the role of vehicles in a more complex mobility mix.  How must automakers adapt?

Join us for our next interactive webcam webcast on the IBM Global Business Services Livestream channel:  http://www.livestream.com/newintelligence

Panelists:

Dan Sturges  is an integrated mobility specialist with a background in vehicle /product innovation. He’s worked with leading transportation institutions on hybrid transit/shared personal vehicle systems.  He invented the “Neighborhood Electric Vehicle” category.


Kal Gyimesi is IBM Institute for Business Value Automotive leader. The IBV is IBM’s think tank for publishing new, fact-based, business research.  His latest study is titled Advancing Mobility: The new frontier of smarter transportation.


Sue Zielinski is the Managing Director of SMART at the University of Michigan’s. SMART is for Sustainable Mobility & Accessibility Research & Transformation. Her background is in Urban Planning and is she is actively consulting with automotive companies on new mobility strategies.

.

Jack Mason (moderator) is the social media leader on the Strategic Programs team for IBM Global Business Services. He is passionate about cars, mobile and video innovations and building a planet of smarter cities.


About the Smart Leaders vPanel Series: vPanels are webcam-based interactive webcasts to foster dialogue between thought leaders and viewers. Subscribe to the series to sample past discussions and to be alerted to new ones. And visit Smarter Leaders Mobile on your smartphone for an integrated view of content about next generation leadership from Tumblr, Twitter, YouTube and more.

Google  LatLong: Google Maps can now send destinations directly to more than 20  car brands worldwide
When we started the “Send-To-Car” service on Google Maps more than three years ago with BMW, only a few car makers offered connected services to their drivers. The industry has come a long way since then. Several car manufacturers have made industry-changing commitments to bringing connectivity to the majority, if not the entirety of their car line. We see more and more cars with connected navigation and entertainment systems leaving the assembly line and the trend is here to stay. That’s fantastic news for both drivers and the automotive industry.

Google LatLong: Google Maps can now send destinations directly to more than 20 car brands worldwide

When we started the “Send-To-Car” service on Google Maps more than three years ago with BMW, only a few car makers offered connected services to their drivers. The industry has come a long way since then. Several car manufacturers have made industry-changing commitments to bringing connectivity to the majority, if not the entirety of their car line. We see more and more cars with connected navigation and entertainment systems leaving the assembly line and the trend is here to stay. That’s fantastic news for both drivers and the automotive industry.