Free, Open-Source Digital Textbook Provider, Boundless, Releases Its Content Under Creative Commons | TechCrunch
Since first emerging early last year, Boston-based startup Boundless has been on a mission to give students a free alternative to the financial and physical costs of bulky backpacks brimming with pricey hard-copy textbooks. Co-founders Ariel Diaz, Brian Balfour and Aaron White believe that the incumbents, the old-school textbook publishers (the top four of which still control the market) have been driving up the cost of educational content for years, so Boundless has been fighting the Powers That Be by offering a free, digital alternative culled from existing, open educational resources.

Free, Open-Source Digital Textbook Provider, Boundless, Releases Its Content Under Creative Commons | TechCrunch

Since first emerging early last year, Boston-based startup Boundless has been on a mission to give students a free alternative to the financial and physical costs of bulky backpacks brimming with pricey hard-copy textbooks. Co-founders Ariel Diaz, Brian Balfour and Aaron White believe that the incumbents, the old-school textbook publishers (the top four of which still control the market) have been driving up the cost of educational content for years, so Boundless has been fighting the Powers That Be by offering a free, digital alternative culled from existing, open educational resources.

New Hope For Open Source Textbooks | TechCrunch
Free digital open source textbooks are a promising alternative for states looking to cut costs and for universities trying to spare students from the soaring price of higher education. A growing number of laptop computers and tablets in the classroom provide an even greater opportunity to switch.  Indeed, the fledgling open source textbook movement is getting extra attention these days. Experiments are underway in a number of states and districts.
Last month, Utah’s State Office of Education said it would start a program to make open source textbooks available to students in kindergarten through 12th grade. Washington State’s legislature is considering a similar program.  The idea of open source textbooks is not new. They have been around for more than a decade, a period in which the major commercial publishers hiked textbook prices faster than inflation.  Until recently, however, open source textbooks gained little traction, in part, because of the byzantine process for approving school books. State and local school boards, which insure that books meet standards, are not known for innovative thinking.

New Hope For Open Source Textbooks | TechCrunch

Free digital open source textbooks are a promising alternative for states looking to cut costs and for universities trying to spare students from the soaring price of higher education. A growing number of laptop computers and tablets in the classroom provide an even greater opportunity to switch. Indeed, the fledgling open source textbook movement is getting extra attention these days. Experiments are underway in a number of states and districts.

Last month, Utah’s State Office of Education said it would start a program to make open source textbooks available to students in kindergarten through 12th grade. Washington State’s legislature is considering a similar program. The idea of open source textbooks is not new. They have been around for more than a decade, a period in which the major commercial publishers hiked textbook prices faster than inflation. Until recently, however, open source textbooks gained little traction, in part, because of the byzantine process for approving school books. State and local school boards, which insure that books meet standards, are not known for innovative thinking.

infoneer-pulse:

Macmillan’s DynamicBooks Lets Professors Rewrite E-Textbooks

Readers can modify content on the Web, so why not in books?
In a kind of Wikipedia of textbooks, Macmillan, one of the five largest publishers of trade books and textbooks, is introducing software called DynamicBooks, which will allow college instructors to edit digital editions of textbooks and customize them for their individual classes.
Professors will be able to reorganize or delete chapters; upload course syllabuses, notes, videos, pictures and graphs; and perhaps most notably, rewrite or delete individual paragraphs, equations or illustrations.

» via The New York Times

infoneer-pulse:

Macmillan’s DynamicBooks Lets Professors Rewrite E-Textbooks

Readers can modify content on the Web, so why not in books?

In a kind of Wikipedia of textbooks, Macmillan, one of the five largest publishers of trade books and textbooks, is introducing software called DynamicBooks, which will allow college instructors to edit digital editions of textbooks and customize them for their individual classes.

Professors will be able to reorganize or delete chapters; upload course syllabuses, notes, videos, pictures and graphs; and perhaps most notably, rewrite or delete individual paragraphs, equations or illustrations.

» via The New York Times

Top  10 ed-tech stories of 2009: No.  1 | eSchool News
Schools’ use of digital textbooks began long before 2009, but it was a watershed year for this emerging trend in education. At the K-12 level, California and Texas—two bellwether states for textbook purchasing—opened the door for local school systems to adopt digital texts. In higher education, inspired by the introduction of a Kindle electronic reader designed specifically for textbooks, several colleges and universities announced pilot projects to see how well the technology meets students’ needs.

Top 10 ed-tech stories of 2009: No.  1 | eSchool News

Schools’ use of digital textbooks began long before 2009, but it was a watershed year for this emerging trend in education. At the K-12 level, California and Texas—two bellwether states for textbook purchasing—opened the door for local school systems to adopt digital texts. In higher education, inspired by the introduction of a Kindle electronic reader designed specifically for textbooks, several colleges and universities announced pilot projects to see how well the technology meets students’ needs.