Making Transit Social by Mission Possible (by GOODIdeasforCities)

As part of GOOD Ideas for Cities Cincinnati, Mission Possible presents their idea for encouraging more residents to ride a new bus rapid transit system. The team is then joined by GOOD Ideas for Cities editor Alissa Walker and Sallie Hilvers, Metro; Gina Douthat, TANK; Mary Stagaman, Agenda 360 and Adena Kass and Bill Scheyer, Vision 2015.

smartercities:

Sheltering A City With Data: The Rio de Janeiro Story (by IBM)

Rio de Janeiro, the most visited city in the southern hemisphere, will soon play host to both the World Cup and the Olympic Games. Unfortunately it is also the location of the biggest natural disaster in Brazil’s history. In 2010, Rio de Janeiro was devastated by severe floods and mudslides, which took hundreds of lives and left thousands homeless.

Out of the need for improved emergency management and better weather prediction, IBM helped the city integrate predictive analytics, real-time data, and weather modeling technology and establish a state-of-the-art operations center. At the heart of the center is PMAR, a high resolution weather prediction system powered by IBM’s Deep Thunder supercomputer. It lets the city predict rains and floods 48 hours in advance, allowing for better management of emergency services and potentially saving lives.

From there the Rio Operations Center grew, and now acts as a nervous system for the entire city: managing traffic congestion, keeping a close eye on crime response and prevention, predicting brownouts in the power grid, and coordinating large-scale events to ensure public safety.

Integrating over 30 agencies and services across the city, the Rio Operations Center empowers the government and its citizens to be prepared for whatever nature may throw their way. IBM is helping make cities smarter. Let’s build a smarter planet -

The Internet of Things: By 2020, between 22 and 50 billion devices will be connected to the Internet, providing citizens with an unprecedented array of smart applications and services. Europe is confronted with the challenge of remaining at the cutting-edge of this Internet of Things revolution while addressing the complex policy issues that it raises (privacy, security, ethics).

via cityfibre:

'Smart' cities aim to predict — and manage — traffic future | Greenbang
The “internet of things,” as the smart grid is often called, entails  making our lives, homes and cities more efficient by connecting all the  pieces with networking technology and applying advanced strategies like  “big data” analytics to better understand how all the pieces interact.
The analogy to the computing internet, though, isn’t entirely  applicable. For one, the internet of things is aimed not only at making  our systems work better and smarter, but to actually help predict the  future.
Consider that bane of metropolitan motorists everywhere, for example:  the city traffic jam. Where the traditional response has been to build  new roads, expand mass transit or institute congestion pricing, smart  technology aims to help predict bottlenecks before they occur and manage  traffic accordingly to prevent jams.
Look at what IBM is currently doing in the Chinese city of Zhenjiang.  Using its Intelligent Operations Center for Smarter Cities, Big Blue  aims to help the city of three million use analytics to not only enable real-time bus monitoring and management, but to simulate traffic flow patterns ahead of time.  By anticipating traffic problems before they happen, IBM’s Intelligent  Transportation technology is designed to improve the city’s public  transit system and “increase traffic throughput” … in other words, make  it possible for more traffic to flow through streets without the need to  build more roads or otherwise radically change the existing  infrastructure.
“(W)e will make our public transportation system faster and more  efficient, while making our city a better place to live in,” said  Mingnian Yin, director of Zhenjiang’s Reform Commission.

'Smart' cities aim to predict — and manage — traffic future | Greenbang

The “internet of things,” as the smart grid is often called, entails making our lives, homes and cities more efficient by connecting all the pieces with networking technology and applying advanced strategies like “big data” analytics to better understand how all the pieces interact.

The analogy to the computing internet, though, isn’t entirely applicable. For one, the internet of things is aimed not only at making our systems work better and smarter, but to actually help predict the future.

Consider that bane of metropolitan motorists everywhere, for example: the city traffic jam. Where the traditional response has been to build new roads, expand mass transit or institute congestion pricing, smart technology aims to help predict bottlenecks before they occur and manage traffic accordingly to prevent jams.

Look at what IBM is currently doing in the Chinese city of Zhenjiang. Using its Intelligent Operations Center for Smarter Cities, Big Blue aims to help the city of three million use analytics to not only enable real-time bus monitoring and management, but to simulate traffic flow patterns ahead of time. By anticipating traffic problems before they happen, IBM’s Intelligent Transportation technology is designed to improve the city’s public transit system and “increase traffic throughput” … in other words, make it possible for more traffic to flow through streets without the need to build more roads or otherwise radically change the existing infrastructure.

“(W)e will make our public transportation system faster and more efficient, while making our city a better place to live in,” said Mingnian Yin, director of Zhenjiang’s Reform Commission.

Let the Robot Drive: The Autonomous Car of the Future Is Here | Wired
…
Google isn’t the only company with driverless cars on the road. Indeed, just about every traditional automaker is developing its own self-driving model, peppering Silicon Valley with new R&D labs to work on the challenge. Last year, a BMW drove itself down the Autobahn, from Munich to Ingolstadt (“the home of Audi,” as BMW’s Dirk Rossberg told me at the company’s outpost in Mountain View, California). Audi sent an autonomous vehicle up Pikes Peak, while VW, in conjunction with Stanford, is building a successor to Junior. At the Tokyo Auto Show in November, Toyota unveiled its Prius AVOS (Automatic Vehicle Operation System), which can be summoned remotely. GM’s Alan Taub predicts that self-driving cars will be on the road by the decade’s end. Groups like the Society of Automotive Engineers have formed special committees to draft autonomous-vehicle standards.

Let the Robot Drive: The Autonomous Car of the Future Is Here | Wired

Google isn’t the only company with driverless cars on the road. Indeed, just about every traditional automaker is developing its own self-driving model, peppering Silicon Valley with new R&D labs to work on the challenge. Last year, a BMW drove itself down the Autobahn, from Munich to Ingolstadt (“the home of Audi,” as BMW’s Dirk Rossberg told me at the company’s outpost in Mountain View, California). Audi sent an autonomous vehicle up Pikes Peak, while VW, in conjunction with Stanford, is building a successor to Junior. At the Tokyo Auto Show in November, Toyota unveiled its Prius AVOS (Automatic Vehicle Operation System), which can be summoned remotely. GM’s Alan Taub predicts that self-driving cars will be on the road by the decade’s end. Groups like the Society of Automotive Engineers have formed special committees to draft autonomous-vehicle standards.

Business Analytics - Turning Data Into Insight (by IBM)

In an era of Smarter Analytics, it is imperative that businesses leverage the massive quantities of data available to them. In order to remain competitive, data must be transformed into insight and integrated into business processes.

Connect w/ Simon Thomas at http://www.linkedin.com/pub/simon-thomas/1/228/45

Could Twitter Help Us Create Smarter Transit Routes?

“Traditional city maps visualize just one aspect of urban design—the city’s intended structure, full stop. But add in a layer that visualizes how people actually use the city, and then the map becomes much more interesting. Eric Fischer did exactly that when he used Twitter’s API to collect tens of thousands of geotagged tweets and map them onto the streets of New York, Chicago, and the San Francisco Bay area. The maps amount to something close to adesire path on a macro scale: The maps show where our buses and subways should be, if they conformed to the way we actually move and live.”
via studio630:

Could Twitter Help Us Create Smarter Transit Routes?

Traditional city maps visualize just one aspect of urban design—the city’s intended structure, full stop. But add in a layer that visualizes how people actually use the city, and then the map becomes much more interesting. Eric Fischer did exactly that when he used Twitter’s API to collect tens of thousands of geotagged tweets and map them onto the streets of New YorkChicago, and the San Francisco Bay area. The maps amount to something close to adesire path on a macro scale: The maps show where our buses and subways should be, if they conformed to the way we actually move and live.”

via studio630:

4 Cities Using Tech to Alleviate Traffic | Mashable
There are one billion cars on the road, and that number could reach 2.5 billion by 2020. That auto congestion not only wreaks havoc on the environment, but also frustrates the commuters sitting in traffic on their way to work. The IBM Commuter Pain Index compiled traffic angst data by city and found that 87% of people had been stuck in traffic in the past three years, and 31% said the traffic was so bad that they turned around and went home. Clearly, traffic is a major issue when it comes to metropolitan living and urban mobility, but help is on the way.  

4 Cities Using Tech to Alleviate Traffic | Mashable

There are one billion cars on the road, and that number could reach 2.5 billion by 2020. That auto congestion not only wreaks havoc on the environment, but also frustrates the commuters sitting in traffic on their way to work. The IBM Commuter Pain Index compiled traffic angst data by city and found that 87% of people had been stuck in traffic in the past three years, and 31% said the traffic was so bad that they turned around and went home. Clearly, traffic is a major issue when it comes to metropolitan living and urban mobility, but help is on the way.  

There are a lot of examples of big data and analytics that were previously unmanageable that are now becoming reasonable targets, most of which could be considered event-based: device instrumentation, weather data, social media, credit card transactions, crime statistics, traffic data and more. There are also some interesting problems in determining identity and relationships: figuring out who people really are even when they use different versions of their name, and who they are connected to in a variety of different ways that might indicate potential for fraud or other misrepresentation. Scary and big-brotherish to some, but undeniably providing organizations (including governments) with deeper insights into their customers and constituents. If those who complain about governments using this sort of technology “against” them would learn how to use it themselves, the tables might be turned as we gain insight into how well government is providing services to us.