Facebook, Google Less Trusted Than Your Grocery Store | Mashable

According to the survey customers trust grocery stores with their personal information more than they trust Facebook, AmazonGoogle or their cellphone provider.

According to the survey, 81% of consumers were comfortable with grocery stores using information about past purchases to give you coupons tailored to your shopping needs. But only 33% of respondents were comfortable with Facebook using profile information to target ads specifically for you.

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The massive impact of science on our collective and individual lives has decreased the willingness of many to accept the pronouncements of scientists unless they can verify the strength of the underlying evidence for themselves. […] It is vital that science is not seen to hide behind closed laboratory doors, but engages seriously with the public.

Open your minds and share your results, says Geoffry Boulton, asking that scientists make data available to the public and to other researchers, because “Science’s capacity for self-correction comes from this openness to scrutiny and challenge”.

Science as an open enterprise is a report from the Royal Society that highlights 6 main changes needed to improve the openess of science:

  1. “a shift away from a research culture where data is viewed as a private preserve;
  2. expanding the criteria used to evaluate research to give credit for useful data communication and novel ways of collaborating;
  3. the development of common standards for communicating data;
  4. mandating intelligent openness for data relevant to published scientific papers;
  5. strengthening the cohort of data scientists needed to manage and support the use of digital data;
  6. the development and use of new software tools to automate and simplify the creation and exploitation of datasets.
The Internet Of Things: How Will We Trust A Word It Says? - Tech Europe - WSJ
But what are the security issues surrounding an internet of 50 billion devices, 48 billion of which are going to be cheap remote sensors of some kind? And what are the security implications? One of the key issues is data integrity. How do you trust the data your sensors are sending? In fact how do you even know it is a sensor that is sending data at all, and not a bot or piece of malware? Then there is the problem of encryption. When smart meters are installed across the grid you can be sure that they will have a high degree of encryption built into them—after all they are likely to be pretty expensive pieces of kit. You can be sure that authentication and encryption will be built in. But what about a cheap (less than €1) sensor that is, say, responsible for reporting whether a parking place is occupied, or one that reports on the tensions in a restraining cable. How much encryption will be built into a 10¢ chip? But if it sends its data unencrypted, and it doesn’t use proper authentication, then it really is a simple matter of jumping in and adding whatever data you want to that stream.  

The Internet Of Things: How Will We Trust A Word It Says? - Tech Europe - WSJ

But what are the security issues surrounding an internet of 50 billion devices, 48 billion of which are going to be cheap remote sensors of some kind? And what are the security implications? One of the key issues is data integrity. How do you trust the data your sensors are sending? In fact how do you even know it is a sensor that is sending data at all, and not a bot or piece of malware? Then there is the problem of encryption. When smart meters are installed across the grid you can be sure that they will have a high degree of encryption built into them—after all they are likely to be pretty expensive pieces of kit. You can be sure that authentication and encryption will be built in. But what about a cheap (less than €1) sensor that is, say, responsible for reporting whether a parking place is occupied, or one that reports on the tensions in a restraining cable. How much encryption will be built into a 10¢ chip? But if it sends its data unencrypted, and it doesn’t use proper authentication, then it really is a simple matter of jumping in and adding whatever data you want to that stream.  

Stephen M. R. Covey invites Greater IBMers to The Speed of Trust series (via greateribmvideos)

Stephen M. R. Covey invites the members of The Greater IBM Connection , the official IBM alumni program, to an exclusive Webcast on September 16, 2009 at 3 p.m. EDT He will discuss the power of “trust ” to transform personal and business relationships. In his bestseller, “The Speed of Trust”, Covey states that: “trust is the one thing that changes everything”. If you are a former or current IBMer, don’t miss this event. Register now athttp://www.greaterbm.com.