$25 Model A Raspberry Pi Microcomputer Goes On Sale In Europe — Available To Rest Of World “Very Soon” | TechCrunch

The affordable Raspberry Pi microcomputer just got even more affordable: the slated $25 Model A Raspberry Pi board has now gone on sale in Europe. The Raspberry Pi Foundation, which created the Pi on a mission to get more kids learning to code, announced the Model A’s arrival and said sales are being restricted to Europe initially but will be opened up to the rest of the world “very soon”.

Cheat  Sheet: The internet of things | Networks | silicon.com
The internet of things, you say? Sounds like an oxymoron to me. The internet of things - or IoT for short - is all about bringing the analogue (physical) world into the digital (virtual) sphere so that physical objects can be identified, tracked, located and even controlled online, in real-time. And what does the IoT mean? Lots and lots more lovely data. Tell me more… IoT describes a not-so-far-distant future reality towards which our increasingly wired and sensor-strewn society is accelerating. There are many names for this already: other terms you may have come across include: ubiquitous computing (or ubicomp), invisible computing, pervasive computing and even - somewhat inevitably - web 3.0. The gist is: couple ubiquitous wireless and cellular networks with everyday objects that have wireless sensors embedded in them et voila: there’s your internet of things - smart objects that can be identified by the tiny chips they contain. 


Cheat Sheet: The internet of things | Networks | silicon.com

The internet of things, you say? Sounds like an oxymoron to me. The internet of things - or IoT for short - is all about bringing the analogue (physical) world into the digital (virtual) sphere so that physical objects can be identified, tracked, located and even controlled online, in real-time. And what does the IoT mean? Lots and lots more lovely data. Tell me more… IoT describes a not-so-far-distant future reality towards which our increasingly wired and sensor-strewn society is accelerating. There are many names for this already: other terms you may have come across include: ubiquitous computing (or ubicomp), invisible computing, pervasive computing and even - somewhat inevitably - web 3.0. The gist is: couple ubiquitous wireless and cellular networks with everyday objects that have wireless sensors embedded in them et voila: there’s your internet of things - smart objects that can be identified by the tiny chips they contain. 

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API FOR THE WORLD

With a small bit of software and a tiny physical device any object with a power cord can become a networked object and connected to the web.  It’s part of an effort to fill the gap between “smart” and low-tech devices.  For eample a desk lamp could order itself new lightbulbs, or a Refrigerator could alert you to pick up milk in your car on your way home.  The team behind this is calling it a “social network for everyday objects” because you can use an online dashboard to create unique profiles for different objects in your house and connect them to a variety of web services.  Another term used to describe this kind of thing is the “internet of things”.

(via droga5x5)

smartercities:

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Visible Cities #01: Euro Beinat and Ronald Lenz
The widespread employment and adoption of ubiquitous computing, sensor networks and mobile media into the urban environment have unforeseen implications for how we might come to use networked digital resources to change the way we understand, build, and inhabit cities. Visible Cities presents a revolving programme on how emerging technologies are changing the cities we live in.

smartercities:

spime:

Visible Cities #01: Euro Beinat and Ronald Lenz

The widespread employment and adoption of ubiquitous computing, sensor networks and mobile media into the urban environment have unforeseen implications for how we might come to use networked digital resources to change the way we understand, build, and inhabit cities. Visible Cities presents a revolving programme on how emerging technologies are changing the cities we live in.

Cross Reality: When Sensors Meet Virtual Reality| ReadWriteWeb
During my recent visit to MIT in Boston I met with Joseph Paradiso, Associate Professor and Director of the Responsive Environments Group at MIT Media Laboratory. He showed me some demos of what his lab is up to, focusing mostly on what is termed “Cross Reality”. This is when sensor/actuator networks meet online virtual worlds.

Cross Reality: When Sensors Meet Virtual Reality| ReadWriteWeb

During my recent visit to MIT in Boston I met with Joseph Paradiso, Associate Professor and Director of the Responsive Environments Group at MIT Media Laboratory. He showed me some demos of what his lab is up to, focusing mostly on what is termed “Cross Reality”. This is when sensor/actuator networks meet online virtual worlds.

Open Source Sensing
Pervasive sensing is arriving soon — we have a short window of opportunity for guiding this technology to protect both our security *and* our privacy.

Open Source Sensing

Pervasive sensing is arriving soon — we have a short window of opportunity for guiding this technology to protect both our security *and* our privacy.

Microblogging has emerged as a powerful and vesatile new form of asynchronous, multi-modal communication between people. It is now increasingly being populated not just by bots sending and receiving spam messages, but sensors reporting observational data. (via Social objects in the Twitter-verse | Signtific)

Microblogging has emerged as a powerful and vesatile new form of asynchronous, multi-modal communication between people. It is now increasingly being populated not just by bots sending and receiving spam messages, but sensors reporting observational data. (via Social objects in the Twitter-verse | Signtific)

IBM’s Zürich Research Laboratory is working in the Mote Runner runtime and development platform for heterogeneous wireless networks. It’s meant to overcome some of the challenge of programming a WSN application. Although currently, it runs exclusively on Crossbow Iris motes, the runtime environment creates a virtual machine which shields applications from hardware heterogeneity, and is supposed to support a diversity of platforms. Developers are working to have the platform available in a near future. This article on EE Times has the story. You would also visit the project website for a deailed look. (via Wireless Sensor Networks » Blog Archive » IBM Zürich Research on Mote Runner)

IBM’s Zürich Research Laboratory is working in the Mote Runner runtime and development platform for heterogeneous wireless networks. It’s meant to overcome some of the challenge of programming a WSN application. Although currently, it runs exclusively on Crossbow Iris motes, the runtime environment creates a virtual machine which shields applications from hardware heterogeneity, and is supposed to support a diversity of platforms. Developers are working to have the platform available in a near future. This article on EE Times has the story. You would also visit the project website for a deailed look. (via Wireless Sensor Networks » Blog Archive » IBM Zürich Research on Mote Runner)

The first revolution was about wireless voice networks, in two steps: in-house and then outdoors (DECT/GSM). The second revolution was about wireless high speed data (Wi-Fi) in every laptop, you can’t buy them without it anymore. And finally, the third wave with sense and control networks (ZigBee)? (via Computer-Internet Tips and Tricks: The Third Wireless Wave - Sensor networks)

The first revolution was about wireless voice networks, in two steps: in-house and then outdoors (DECT/GSM). The second revolution was about wireless high speed data (Wi-Fi) in every laptop, you can’t buy them without it anymore. And finally, the third wave with sense and control networks (ZigBee)? (via Computer-Internet Tips and Tricks: The Third Wireless Wave - Sensor networks)

My first book, Everyware: The dawning age of ubiquitous computing, is … about an important change I see unfolding in the world: the emergence of a computing without computers, where information processing is almost imperceptible, but everywhere around us. Smart buildings, smart furniture, smart clothing…even smart bathtubs. Networked street signs and self-describing soda cans. Gestural interfaces like those seen in Minority Report. The RFID tags now embedded in everything from credit cards to the family pet. All of these are facets of the class of technologies I think of as “everyware.”

One approach to transforming primary care is the patient-centered medical home (PCMH), or the “medical home” — an enhanced primary-care model that provides comprehensive and timely care with appropriate reimbursement, emphasizing the central role of teamwork and engagement by those receiving care.  IBM - Patient-centered medical home - PCMH Register to download complete IBM Institute for Business Value study Download the executive summary (129KB. PDF)

One approach to transforming primary care is the patient-centered medical home (PCMH), or the “medical home” — an enhanced primary-care model that provides comprehensive and timely care with appropriate reimbursement, emphasizing the central role of teamwork and engagement by those receiving care. IBM - Patient-centered medical home - PCMH Register to download complete IBM Institute for Business Value study Download the executive summary (129KB. PDF)