Scientists Print Cheap RFID Tags On Paper | TechWeekEurope UK
Technology could make RFID tags cheap enough to replace barcodes in the future
A way to print Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chips right onto paper has been discovered by a team of scientists from University of Montpellier.
The  technique uses a thermal evaporation process to deposit of thin  aluminium coil antennas on sheets of paper which can later be used to  create packaging or printed material. Researchers claim that this works  out to be cheaper than any other method of  producing RFID tags,  allowing the technology to replace both barcodes and QR codes.

Scientists Print Cheap RFID Tags On Paper | TechWeekEurope UK

Technology could make RFID tags cheap enough to replace barcodes in the future

A way to print Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) chips right onto paper has been discovered by a team of scientists from University of Montpellier.

The technique uses a thermal evaporation process to deposit of thin aluminium coil antennas on sheets of paper which can later be used to create packaging or printed material. Researchers claim that this works out to be cheaper than any other method of  producing RFID tags, allowing the technology to replace both barcodes and QR codes.

smartercities:

spime:

Visible Cities #01: Euro Beinat and Ronald Lenz
The widespread employment and adoption of ubiquitous computing, sensor networks and mobile media into the urban environment have unforeseen implications for how we might come to use networked digital resources to change the way we understand, build, and inhabit cities. Visible Cities presents a revolving programme on how emerging technologies are changing the cities we live in.

smartercities:

spime:

Visible Cities #01: Euro Beinat and Ronald Lenz

The widespread employment and adoption of ubiquitous computing, sensor networks and mobile media into the urban environment have unforeseen implications for how we might come to use networked digital resources to change the way we understand, build, and inhabit cities. Visible Cities presents a revolving programme on how emerging technologies are changing the cities we live in.

spime:

transforms:

newecologyofthings
“The new ecology of things (NET) is a research initiative to explore emerging forms of interactive communication brought about by pervasive networked technologies. The project began as a studio class run by Art Center’s Graduate Media Design Program and has evolved into a conceptual model, a forum for discussion, an ongoing series of projects, technological inventions, and new issues for design pedagogy.” via ryvarga

spime:

transforms:

newecologyofthings

“The new ecology of things (NET) is a research initiative to explore emerging forms of interactive communication brought about by pervasive networked technologies. The project began as a studio class run by Art Center’s Graduate Media Design Program and has evolved into a conceptual model, a forum for discussion, an ongoing series of projects, technological inventions, and new issues for design pedagogy.” via ryvarga

This video shows an iron nanoparticle shuttle moving through a carbon nanotube in the presence of a low voltage electrical current. The shuttles position inside the tube can function as a high-density nonvolatile memory element.
(Courtesy of /Zettl Research Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California at Berkeley)/

Ultra-dense billion year memory chip (via BerkeleyLab)

The “hand breathalyser” bit is a wall-mounted sensor system mounted in the hospital washrooms. After washing their hands, medics put them into the sensor. Provided that a suitable level of sanitiser chemicals are detected, the badge is wirelessly updated and a green light illuminates on the sensor. (via June R&D Round Up - Sensors)

The “hand breathalyser” bit is a wall-mounted sensor system mounted in the hospital washrooms. After washing their hands, medics put them into the sensor. Provided that a suitable level of sanitiser chemicals are detected, the badge is wirelessly updated and a green light illuminates on the sensor. (via June R&D Round Up - Sensors)

On Wednesday, Google announced that it would open its servers to geographic data belonging to anyone. This means that developers will be able to quickly build a location-based Web service without having to also manage their own data server. (via Technology Review: Google Grabs More Geo-Data)

On Wednesday, Google announced that it would open its servers to geographic data belonging to anyone. This means that developers will be able to quickly build a location-based Web service without having to also manage their own data server. (via Technology Review: Google Grabs More Geo-Data)

The Federal Communications Commission yesterday began mapping out a plan to bring high-speed Internet service to the entire nation, starting with questions on how to increase its availability, improve its quality of service and make it more affordable. (via FCC Developing Plan To Deliver Broadband)

The Federal Communications Commission yesterday began mapping out a plan to bring high-speed Internet service to the entire nation, starting with questions on how to increase its availability, improve its quality of service and make it more affordable. (via FCC Developing Plan To Deliver Broadband)

einsmarterplanet:
Thanks to Dirk Spannaus for spotting this at http://now.sprint.com/widget. While this is effectively an advertisement for Sprint, the widget exemplifies what a world of ubiquitous computing, measuring and analytics can look and feel like.

Würde so das Cockpit für unseren Smarten Planeten aussehen? Sprint hat sich für eine Werbecampagne für mobile Breitbandanschlüsse darüber scheinbar Gedanken gemacht und eine interessante Webseite mit verschiedensten Widgets zusammengestellt… Sehr interessant!
Hintergrund: Die meisten Widgets basieren derzeit auf statistischen Auswertungen, aber denkbar wäre sowas auch mit realen Informationen, wenn Sie intelligent vernetzt wären… Andere Quellen sind scheinbar live verlinkt.

einsmarterplanet:

Thanks to Dirk Spannaus for spotting this at http://now.sprint.com/widget. While this is effectively an advertisement for Sprint, the widget exemplifies what a world of ubiquitous computing, measuring and analytics can look and feel like.

Würde so das Cockpit für unseren Smarten Planeten aussehen? Sprint hat sich für eine Werbecampagne für mobile Breitbandanschlüsse darüber scheinbar Gedanken gemacht und eine interessante Webseite mit verschiedensten Widgets zusammengestellt… Sehr interessant!

Hintergrund: Die meisten Widgets basieren derzeit auf statistischen Auswertungen, aber denkbar wäre sowas auch mit realen Informationen, wenn Sie intelligent vernetzt wären… Andere Quellen sind scheinbar live verlinkt.

5. IBM Smarter Planet
O’Reilly highlighted the IBM Smarter Planet project in his talk about the future tonight. Smarter Planet is a broad body of initiatives by IBM to integrate efficient technology into a wide variety of systems around the world. Much of it is public infrastructure work. (via Five Technologies Tim O’Reilly Says Point Past Web 2.0 - ReadWriteWeb)

5. IBM Smarter Planet

O’Reilly highlighted the IBM Smarter Planet project in his talk about the future tonight. Smarter Planet is a broad body of initiatives by IBM to integrate efficient technology into a wide variety of systems around the world. Much of it is public infrastructure work. (via Five Technologies Tim O’Reilly Says Point Past Web 2.0 - ReadWriteWeb)

reQall is a voice-enabled memory aid that seamlessly integrates your mobile phone, email, text messaging and IM into a powerful organizer, reminder system and productivity assistant. reQall lets you capture your ideas, tasks and commitments before you forget, and it proactively keeps you well-prepared and memory-strong.