I too believe that cities are the way to live in the future. There are things we need to consider and accomplish in order to create healthy worthwhile environments for all to live in.

1barefootgirl explains why she’s supporting our campaign to make #urbanism a featured tag.  If you agree, then help jumpstart #urbanism by using the tag and help us spread the word! You can always send us an ask message to tell us why you think #urbanism is important and why you’re supporting the campaign! (via thisbigcity)
Six Kickstarter Projects for Cities | This Big City
Kickstarter is the world’s largest funding platform for creative projects. It has funded a diverse array of endeavors ranging from indie films, music, stage shows and comics to journalism, video games and food-related projects. Urban enthusiasts and public spacemakers are also embracing Kickstarter to gather financial support for projects that enhance city life and raise awareness about urban issues.
Here are some Kickstarter projects from 2012 with an urban focus:

Six Kickstarter Projects for Cities | This Big City

Kickstarter is the world’s largest funding platform for creative projects. It has funded a diverse array of endeavors ranging from indie films, music, stage shows and comics to journalism, video games and food-related projects. Urban enthusiasts and public spacemakers are also embracing Kickstarter to gather financial support for projects that enhance city life and raise awareness about urban issues.

Here are some Kickstarter projects from 2012 with an urban focus:

City as Laboratory for Alternative Urban Research and Practice | This Big City
By William Hunter - an architect, urban designer and Teaching Fellow at University College London’s Bartlett Development Planning Unit where he leads studio modules in urban practice in the developing world, critical case study analysis, and investigative design strategies. 
The current landscape of cities is that of contested processes, interdependencies and relations which are dominated to various degrees by diverse actors with contrasting voices and agendas. These complex relations emerge from historical and material dialectics of the territory, linking diverse activities with the environment in a time-based evolving process, connecting action sequences that may happen simultaneously both locally and globally. To appropriately engage in this arena, a critical re-appraisal is required concerning a new paradigmatic shift in the cultural discipline and practice of Architecture and Urban Design, one that views design as an interpretive and open form of action.
Arguably a re-appraisal of this nature needs to start in education. The notion of sleepless nights spent toiling over the design of a hypothetical museum or even the genuine article of a micro design-build project does little to enliven an understanding of the underlying and surface complexities that run constant in the shaping of the urban realm. As well as in practice, there is necessary movement to re-engage with the ground, the real, as it unfolds in front of us. Pre-dated by learned theory and methodology, the act of research, especially field-based investigation, becomes paramount to the exposure of a reality that offers higher stakes, higher return value and unparalleled informed experience. As Jeremy Till suggests, there are other ways of doing architecture.
In a move to align with any emerging shift in an alternative or renewed critical design practice, the Bartlett’s Development Planning Unit has launched its 2nd annualsummerLab series. Drawing on extensive internal resources and established departmental ethos, these workshops are an intended extension of academic and professional pursuits seeking to leverage the reality of the city as a laboratory for developing socially responsive design measures that provoke, stimulate, strategize, and reconsider the role of designers and practitioners in promoting spatial justice.

City as Laboratory for Alternative Urban Research and Practice | This Big City

By William Hunter - an architect, urban designer and Teaching Fellow at University College London’s Bartlett Development Planning Unit where he leads studio modules in urban practice in the developing world, critical case study analysis, and investigative design strategies. 

The current landscape of cities is that of contested processes, interdependencies and relations which are dominated to various degrees by diverse actors with contrasting voices and agendas. These complex relations emerge from historical and material dialectics of the territory, linking diverse activities with the environment in a time-based evolving process, connecting action sequences that may happen simultaneously both locally and globally. To appropriately engage in this arena, a critical re-appraisal is required concerning a new paradigmatic shift in the cultural discipline and practice of Architecture and Urban Design, one that views design as an interpretive and open form of action.

Arguably a re-appraisal of this nature needs to start in education. The notion of sleepless nights spent toiling over the design of a hypothetical museum or even the genuine article of a micro design-build project does little to enliven an understanding of the underlying and surface complexities that run constant in the shaping of the urban realm. As well as in practice, there is necessary movement to re-engage with the ground, the real, as it unfolds in front of us. Pre-dated by learned theory and methodology, the act of research, especially field-based investigation, becomes paramount to the exposure of a reality that offers higher stakes, higher return value and unparalleled informed experience. As Jeremy Till suggests, there are other ways of doing architecture.

In a move to align with any emerging shift in an alternative or renewed critical design practice, the Bartlett’s Development Planning Unit has launched its 2nd annualsummerLab series. Drawing on extensive internal resources and established departmental ethos, these workshops are an intended extension of academic and professional pursuits seeking to leverage the reality of the city as a laboratory for developing socially responsive design measures that provoke, stimulate, strategize, and reconsider the role of designers and practitioners in promoting spatial justice.

Kickstarting Urban Renewal with an Underground Park

A Kickstarter campaign is seeking to transform a defunct trolley terminal in Manhattan into a public space. After about a week the project founders, Dan Barasch and James Ramsey, have already raised 60 percent of what they need to make the “Delancey Underground” a reality. 

Read More on GOOD
via good:

Kickstarting Urban Renewal with an Underground Park

A Kickstarter campaign is seeking to transform a defunct trolley terminal in Manhattan into a public space. After about a week the project founders, Dan Barasch and James Ramsey, have already raised 60 percent of what they need to make the “Delancey Underground” a reality. 

Read More on GOOD

via good:

Alex Steffen gave a nifty TED talk about sustainable urban spaces. He touched on a lot of important notions such as the need for energy-efficient smart buildings, or that dense cities are more sustainable than sprawl because people walk or bike instead of drive (obviously). Favorite part:

“Studies say that people are surrounded by places that make them feel at home, often give up their cars altogether…People are saying that it’s moving from the idea of the ‘dream home’ to the ‘dream neighborhood.’”

Thankfully he stops short of promoting hyperdense skyscraper culture - this makes it seem like the ideal city would be made up of densely clustered neighborhoods, each carefully tailored to their demographic. (Whatup Jane Jacobs?) 

This comprehensive article on Treehugger seconds the notion:

Kaid Benfield:

 For our cities and towns to function as successful people habitat, they must be communities where people want to live, work and play. We must make them great, but always within a decidedly urban, nonsprawling form

James Kuntsler: 

I don’t think there’s any question that we have to return to traditional ways of occupying the landscape: walkable cities, towns, and villages, located on waterways and, if we are fortunate, connected by rail lines. These urban places will exist on a much smaller scale than what is familiar to us now, built on a much finer grain. They will have to be connected to farming and food-growing places. A return to human scale will surely lead to a restored regard for artistry in building, since the streetscape will be experienced at walking speed.

via ohtheplaceswewillknow: