Subretinal implant uses light instead of batteries, shows promise in initial testing — Engadget
There’s been significant progress in bringing sight to the blind in recent years, and this looks set to continue that miraculous trend. Scientists at Stanford University have invented a subretinal photodiode implant for people who have lost their vision due to degenerative retinal diseases. Existing tech involves batteries and wires, but the new implant works without such crude appendages. Instead, it’s activated by near-infrared beams projected by a camera that’s mounted on glasses worn by the patient and can record what the patient sees. The beams then stimulate the optic nerve to allow light perception, motion detection and even basic shape awareness. It hasn’t actually been tested with humans just yet, but the first few rodents volunteers have yet to lodge a single complaint.


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Nature Photonics

Subretinal implant uses light instead of batteries, shows promise in initial testing — Engadget

There’s been significant progress in bringing sight to the blind in recent years, and this looks set to continue that miraculous trend. Scientists at Stanford University have invented a subretinal photodiode implant for people who have lost their vision due to degenerative retinal diseases. Existing tech involves batteries and wires, but the new implant works without such crude appendages. Instead, it’s activated by near-infrared beams projected by a camera that’s mounted on glasses worn by the patient and can record what the patient sees. The beams then stimulate the optic nerve to allow light perception, motion detection and even basic shape awareness. It hasn’t actually been tested with humans just yet, but the first few rodents volunteers have yet to lodge a single complaint.

Bionic Eye Expected To Let The Blind See By 2014 - PSFK
With over 285 million visually impaired people in the world, research into restoring vision for the blind is well past its critical stage. But with innovations in technology, and by turning to a focus to even just restoring rudimentary vision, research suggests that a more expansive solution is on the near horizon. Better yet, it’s a solution that may serve as the foundation for something much more instrumental, for many more people.
A team of electrical engineers at the Monash Vision Group (MVG) of Monash University in Australia has had early success in doing just that. The group has been laboratory testing a new microchip that will be used to power a bionic eye. With pre-clinical assessments due to begin shortly, the team’s encouraging results suggest that the project is on track to deliver a direct-to-brain bionic eye implant ready for patient testing by the year 2014.
via PSFK: 

Bionic Eye Expected To Let The Blind See By 2014 - PSFK

With over 285 million visually impaired people in the world, research into restoring vision for the blind is well past its critical stage. But with innovations in technology, and by turning to a focus to even just restoring rudimentary vision, research suggests that a more expansive solution is on the near horizon. Better yet, it’s a solution that may serve as the foundation for something much more instrumental, for many more people.

A team of electrical engineers at the Monash Vision Group (MVG) of Monash University in Australia has had early success in doing just that. The group has been laboratory testing a new microchip that will be used to power a bionic eye. With pre-clinical assessments due to begin shortly, the team’s encouraging results suggest that the project is on track to deliver a direct-to-brain bionic eye implant ready for patient testing by the year 2014.



via PSFK: 

Every Single Gadget Could “See” With World’s Tiniest, Simplest Camera | Fast Company
Picture a camera that has no lens, no moving parts, costs fractions  of a penny to make, and sees as dimly as a short-sighted worm. Doesn’t  exactly sound like a game changer—but it is.
Cornell scientists have achieved the breakthrough by producing what’s called a Planar Fourier Capture Array camera from a  super-cheap material, doped silicon, that’s currently used in all sorts  of chip technology. It’s just one-hundredth of a millimeter deep and a  half a millimeter on each side, which means several of them could fit on  the head of a pin. The magical aspect of the cam is that it doesn’t  need a lens because it makes use of the wave-like properties of light to  work out what it’s looking at, and all the image construction is done  by algorithms in a computer later.

Every Single Gadget Could “See” With World’s Tiniest, Simplest Camera | Fast Company

Picture a camera that has no lens, no moving parts, costs fractions of a penny to make, and sees as dimly as a short-sighted worm. Doesn’t exactly sound like a game changer—but it is.

Cornell scientists have achieved the breakthrough by producing what’s called a Planar Fourier Capture Array camera from a super-cheap material, doped silicon, that’s currently used in all sorts of chip technology. It’s just one-hundredth of a millimeter deep and a half a millimeter on each side, which means several of them could fit on the head of a pin. The magical aspect of the cam is that it doesn’t need a lens because it makes use of the wave-like properties of light to work out what it’s looking at, and all the image construction is done by algorithms in a computer later.

Now I See You A surgery-free prosthetic retina restores vision in blind mice and raises the prospects for something similar in people. The new technique allows researchers to take a grayscale image (top left),  encode it (top right), and transmit it to the brain with far less loss  in fidelity (bottom left) than the standard method allows (bottom  right)

Now I See You A surgery-free prosthetic retina restores vision in blind mice and raises the prospects for something similar in people. The new technique allows researchers to take a grayscale image (top left), encode it (top right), and transmit it to the brain with far less loss in fidelity (bottom left) than the standard method allows (bottom right)