IBM Hopes To Lure New Data-Hungry Customers With Freemium Watson Analytics Tool

IBM IBM +0.6% wants more companies to work with their data through Big Blue, and it’s hoping a freemium model will lower the barrier for entry to get them on board.

The company announced a Watson Analytics tool on Tuesday that allows companies to upload data to the IBM cloud for free and then receive what the company claims will be predictive insights for businesspeople to use. If successful, Watson Analytics should work for companies that don’t have a data scientist.

“Watson Analytics is a tool to let every business user harness all the power we can deliver,” says Alistair Rennie, general manager of business analytics. “What deals am I most likely to win? What sector will be busiest in the next month?”

IBM Hopes To Lure New Data-Hungry Customers With Freemium Watson Analytics Tool

IBM IBM +0.6% wants more companies to work with their data through Big Blue, and it’s hoping a freemium model will lower the barrier for entry to get them on board.

The company announced a Watson Analytics tool on Tuesday that allows companies to upload data to the IBM cloud for free and then receive what the company claims will be predictive insights for businesspeople to use. If successful, Watson Analytics should work for companies that don’t have a data scientist.

“Watson Analytics is a tool to let every business user harness all the power we can deliver,” says Alistair Rennie, general manager of business analytics. “What deals am I most likely to win? What sector will be busiest in the next month?”

ibmblr:

Questions, prepare to meet answers.Indecision could soon be on the endangered list. Watson Analytics is bringing a new breakthrough cognitive service to take on big data. Got a keyboard and a web connection? Just ask your question and out comes the insight for better decision-making. No fancy statistics language required. Get the scoop →

ibmblr:

Questions, prepare to meet answers.
Indecision could soon be on the endangered list. Watson Analytics is bringing a new breakthrough cognitive service to take on big data. Got a keyboard and a web connection? Just ask your question and out comes the insight for better decision-making. No fancy statistics language required. Get the scoop 

IBM Watson Analytics - Overview
Get better data
IBM® Watson™ Analytics helps you find and improve data sets with the touch of a button.
Understand your business
Watson Analytics brings an engaging analytics experience in conversational terms you can understand.
Whether you have a question to answer, an assumption to test or you are not sure what you want, Watson Analytics has you covered.

IBM Watson Analytics - Overview

Get better data

IBM® Watson™ Analytics helps you find and improve data sets with the touch of a button.


Understand your business

Watson Analytics brings an engaging analytics experience in conversational terms you can understand.

Whether you have a question to answer, an assumption to test or you are not sure what you want, Watson Analytics has you covered.

In the fight against cancer, Watson helped identify new target proteins in a matter of weeks, not years, to accelerate the discovery of new treatments. In other industries as well—finance, retail, government, manufacturing, energy, education—Watson is forging new partnerships between humans and computers to enhance, scale and accelerate human expertise. For years, cognitive computing represented the potential for surprising new discoveries. Suddenly, with Watson, it’s the reality. Learn more at ibmwatson.com. Join the conversation at #IBMWatson.

ibmblr:

Watson at your service
“One moment, please.” “We’ll be with you shortly.” “You are eighth in the queue.” Sound all too familiar? Maybe not for long—The Watson Engagement Advisor can listen to customer queries, suggest personalized follow up questions and help operators find answers in a flash. For even faster service, callers can interact directly with Watson itself. Could this also mean an end to the need for mind-numbing “hold music?” (One can only hope.)

ibmblr:

Watson at your service

“One moment, please.” “We’ll be with you shortly.” “You are eighth in the queue.” Sound all too familiar? Maybe not for long—The Watson Engagement Advisor can listen to customer queries, suggest personalized follow up questions and help operators find answers in a flash. For even faster service, callers can interact directly with Watson itself. Could this also mean an end to the need for mind-numbing “hold music?” (One can only hope.)

ibmblr:

"Drawing from all kinds of information sources, Watson will power a whole new generation of cognitive apps — they’ll understand natural language, sense, hypothesize, constantly learn and confidently react and respond with contextual wisdom.”INSIDE THE INVENTIVE MINDSwami ChandrasekaranExecutive ArchitectIBM Watson Solutions

ibmblr:

"Drawing from all kinds of information sources, Watson will power a whole new generation of cognitive apps — they’ll understand natural language, sense, hypothesize, constantly learn and confidently react and respond with contextual wisdom.”

INSIDE THE INVENTIVE MIND
Swami Chandrasekaran
Executive Architect
IBM Watson Solutions

IBM Watson API Coming: 3 Potential Business Applications For IBM’s Watson Cloud Ecosystem
Watson, the name for the IBM supercomputer best known for crushing “Jeopardy!” contestants, is prepping its “cognitive computing” technology to be utilized by third-party developers for the first time via a Watson cloud service called the “Watson Ecosystem.”
The Watson cloud service will release with a development tool kit, access to the application programming interface (API) of Watson, an application marketplace, and educational material about IBM’s supercomputer. IBM says the Watson API should look familiar to any programmers familiar with the RESTful APIs, but details like pricing for the cloud service aren’t set yet. IBM also said it will tap startups to build software for Watson through a number of prominent venture capitalists, though the company refused to name names.

IBM Watson API Coming: 3 Potential Business Applications For IBM’s Watson Cloud Ecosystem

Watson, the name for the IBM supercomputer best known for crushing “Jeopardy!” contestants, is prepping its “cognitive computing” technology to be utilized by third-party developers for the first time via a Watson cloud service called the “Watson Ecosystem.”

The Watson cloud service will release with a development tool kit, access to the application programming interface (API) of Watson, an application marketplace, and educational material about IBM’s supercomputer. IBM says the Watson API should look familiar to any programmers familiar with the RESTful APIs, but details like pricing for the cloud service aren’t set yet. IBM also said it will tap startups to build software for Watson through a number of prominent venture capitalists, though the company refused to name names.

IBM’s more powerful Watson supercomputer is opening up for public use | The Verge
IBM’s Watson supercomputer is taking a big step towards public use. Today, the company announced plans to open Watson up to developers in 2014, establishing an open platform and API that would let coders to build apps on top of the supercomputer’s database and natural language skills. It’s not the first time the project’s been used by outside groups, but the new platform will give developers complete control of the front-end, and require only minimal input from the Watson team at IBM. Companies will still have to contract an instance of Watson from IBM, but once that’s done, their programs will be able to pull questions and answers from the supercomputer in real time.
IBM says the API itself is unusually simple, providing programs with a direct path to ask Watson natural language questions and get an answers back with links to the relevant content from Watson’s database. The question is what the rest of the world might use it for. “We believe that this is such a significant development in the future of computing that we want other people involved in it,” said IBM’s chief technology officer Rob High. “We want to let other partners to have a much deeper say in how cognitive computing evolves.” The program is launching with three partners, including a Fluid Retail deployment that plans to bring a Watson-powered personal-shopper feature to North Face’s e-commerce shop in 2014.

IBM’s more powerful Watson supercomputer is opening up for public use | The Verge

IBM’s Watson supercomputer is taking a big step towards public use. Today, the company announced plans to open Watson up to developers in 2014, establishing an open platform and API that would let coders to build apps on top of the supercomputer’s database and natural language skills. It’s not the first time the project’s been used by outside groups, but the new platform will give developers complete control of the front-end, and require only minimal input from the Watson team at IBM. Companies will still have to contract an instance of Watson from IBM, but once that’s done, their programs will be able to pull questions and answers from the supercomputer in real time.

IBM says the API itself is unusually simple, providing programs with a direct path to ask Watson natural language questions and get an answers back with links to the relevant content from Watson’s database. The question is what the rest of the world might use it for. “We believe that this is such a significant development in the future of computing that we want other people involved in it,” said IBM’s chief technology officer Rob High. “We want to let other partners to have a much deeper say in how cognitive computing evolves.” The program is launching with three partners, including a Fluid Retail deployment that plans to bring a Watson-powered personal-shopper feature to North Face’s e-commerce shop in 2014.

IBM research stakes its future on cognitive computing | ZDNet
IBM Senior Vice President John E. Kelly / Photo: Audrey Quinn
YORKTOWN HEIGHTS, NY – IBM began its colloquium on cognitive computing today with a jewel in the company’s crown. Senior Vice President John E. Kelly took the stage following a video from January 14th, 2011 – the day when IBM’s Watson machine handedly beat Jeopardy champs Ken Jennings and Ken Rutter.
“I remember saying to the audience at that time,” recalled Kelly, “I don’t know if we’re going to win today. But it’s only a matter of when not if a system like Watson is going to surpass human beings at this task. People asked, ‘When did you realize how important this was?’ I think I realized in the year coming up to this that this was really special. Something was really changing in the way that computer systems interacted with people – something very big beyond just a game show is occurring here.”
So what is going on here? The world of data is now exploding, Kelly said, and machines like Watson have arose to provide us with better ways of harnessing this information.
“We are literally creating a digital universe,” he said. “And the way we have to process that is different than we’ve ever experienced before. What we were creating was a system that would be able to deal with portions of this tsunami of data coming at us. If we try to use first generation computing against this wave, it can’t be done. So we need a whole different set of systems, extracting information from noisy data sources in order to come up with rational answers.”
Kelly broke down the history of computing into three eras. First, there was the the tabulating era, with early calculators and tabulating machines made of mechanical systems and later, vacuum tubes. “In the first era of computing we basically fed data in on punch cards,” he said. “There was really no extraction of the data itself, the data was just going along for the ride.”
Next came the programmable era of computing, which ranged in form from vacuum tubes to microprocessors. “It was about taking processes and putting them into the machine,” Kelly explained. “It’s completely controlled by the programming we inflict on the system.”
And now, Kelly said, we are entering the era of cognitive computing, where computers can help us to unlock the insights that this new wealth of data holds. “If we don’t make this transition,” Kelly argued, “the data will be too big for us to have any impact on it. I think that this era of computing is going to be about scaling human capability. The separation between human and machine is going to blur in a very fundamental way.”

IBM research stakes its future on cognitive computing | ZDNet

IBM Senior Vice President John E. Kelly / Photo: Audrey Quinn

YORKTOWN HEIGHTS, NY – IBM began its colloquium on cognitive computing today with a jewel in the company’s crown. Senior Vice President John E. Kelly took the stage following a video from January 14th, 2011 – the day when IBM’s Watson machine handedly beat Jeopardy champs Ken Jennings and Ken Rutter.

“I remember saying to the audience at that time,” recalled Kelly, “I don’t know if we’re going to win today. But it’s only a matter of when not if a system like Watson is going to surpass human beings at this task. People asked, ‘When did you realize how important this was?’ I think I realized in the year coming up to this that this was really special. Something was really changing in the way that computer systems interacted with people – something very big beyond just a game show is occurring here.”

So what is going on here? The world of data is now exploding, Kelly said, and machines like Watson have arose to provide us with better ways of harnessing this information.

“We are literally creating a digital universe,” he said. “And the way we have to process that is different than we’ve ever experienced before. What we were creating was a system that would be able to deal with portions of this tsunami of data coming at us. If we try to use first generation computing against this wave, it can’t be done. So we need a whole different set of systems, extracting information from noisy data sources in order to come up with rational answers.”

Kelly broke down the history of computing into three eras. First, there was the the tabulating era, with early calculators and tabulating machines made of mechanical systems and later, vacuum tubes. “In the first era of computing we basically fed data in on punch cards,” he said. “There was really no extraction of the data itself, the data was just going along for the ride.”

Next came the programmable era of computing, which ranged in form from vacuum tubes to microprocessors. “It was about taking processes and putting them into the machine,” Kelly explained. “It’s completely controlled by the programming we inflict on the system.”

And now, Kelly said, we are entering the era of cognitive computing, where computers can help us to unlock the insights that this new wealth of data holds. “If we don’t make this transition,” Kelly argued, “the data will be too big for us to have any impact on it. I think that this era of computing is going to be about scaling human capability. The separation between human and machine is going to blur in a very fundamental way.”

Smart Machines: IBM’s Watson and the Era of Cognitive Computing
John E. Kelly III and Steve Hamm
We are crossing a new frontier in the evolution of computing and entering the era of cognitive systems. The victory of IBM’s Watson on the television quiz show Jeopardy! revealed how scientists and engineers at IBM and elsewhere are pushing the boundaries of science and technology to create machines that sense, learn, reason, and interact with people in new ways to provide insight and advice.In Smart Machines, John E. Kelly III, director of IBM Research, and Steve Hamm, a writer at IBM and a former business and technology journalist, introduce the fascinating world of “cognitive systems” to general audiences and provide a window into the future of computing. Cognitive systems promise to penetrate complexity and assist people and organizations in better decision making. They can help doctors evaluate and treat patients, augment the ways we see, anticipate major weather events, and contribute to smarter urban planning. Kelly and Hamm’s comprehensive perspective describes this technology inside and out and explains how it will help us conquer the harnessing and understanding of “big data,” one of the major computing challenges facing businesses and governments in the coming decades. Absorbing and impassioned, their book will inspire governments, academics, and the global tech industry to work together to power this exciting wave in innovation.
 (use code SMART to get a 30% discount)

Smart Machines: IBM’s Watson and the Era of Cognitive Computing

John E. Kelly III and Steve Hamm

We are crossing a new frontier in the evolution of computing and entering the era of cognitive systems. The victory of IBM’s Watson on the television quiz show Jeopardy! revealed how scientists and engineers at IBM and elsewhere are pushing the boundaries of science and technology to create machines that sense, learn, reason, and interact with people in new ways to provide insight and advice.

In Smart Machines, John E. Kelly III, director of IBM Research, and Steve Hamm, a writer at IBM and a former business and technology journalist, introduce the fascinating world of “cognitive systems” to general audiences and provide a window into the future of computing. Cognitive systems promise to penetrate complexity and assist people and organizations in better decision making. They can help doctors evaluate and treat patients, augment the ways we see, anticipate major weather events, and contribute to smarter urban planning. Kelly and Hamm’s comprehensive perspective describes this technology inside and out and explains how it will help us conquer the harnessing and understanding of “big data,” one of the major computing challenges facing businesses and governments in the coming decades. Absorbing and impassioned, their book will inspire governments, academics, and the global tech industry to work together to power this exciting wave in innovation.

(use code SMART to get a 30% discount)