More wearables/connected devices and quantified-self launches at CES:
Socks with sensors that improve your running (from Sensoria)
A connected/smart bed that improves your sleep (from Sleep Number)
Two more fitness trackers/wearables/smart watches hybrids (from Atlas and Scosche)

More wearables/connected devices and quantified-self launches at CES:

  • Socks with sensors that improve your running (from Sensoria)
  • A connected/smart bed that improves your sleep (from Sleep Number)
  • Two more fitness trackers/wearables/smart watches hybrids (from Atlas and Scosche)

(via analyticisms)

How you and I could become nodes in the internet of things
A group of French researchers believe that the sensors and transmitters we wear will route and relay data, not just collect it. We won’t just be connected to the network. We’ll be the network.

Ever wonder what the network infrastructure of the future will be? Try looking in the mirror.
Some day our bodies — or at least the clothing or accessories that adorn them — could become key network nodes in the internet of things. European researchers think that sensors and transmitters on our bodies can be used to form cooperative ad hoc networks that could be used for group indoor navigation, crowd-motion capture, health monitoring on a massive scale and especially collaborative communications. Last week, French institute CEA-Leti and three French universities have launched the Cormoran project, which aims to explore the use of such cooperative interpersonal networks.
The concept of wireless body area networks (WBANs) isn’t a new one. WBANs could be used to sever the cord between patients and their monitoring equipment. Companies like Apple and Heapslylon are exploring the possibility of connected clothes with embedded sensors. We’ve already begun embracing a new era of wearables, such as Google Glass to Fitbit (see disclosure), designed to become extensions of our senses and movements.

How you and I could become nodes in the internet of things

A group of French researchers believe that the sensors and transmitters we wear will route and relay data, not just collect it. We won’t just be connected to the network. We’ll be the network.

Ever wonder what the network infrastructure of the future will be? Try looking in the mirror.

Some day our bodies — or at least the clothing or accessories that adorn them — could become key network nodes in the internet of things. European researchers think that sensors and transmitters on our bodies can be used to form cooperative ad hoc networks that could be used for group indoor navigation, crowd-motion capture, health monitoring on a massive scale and especially collaborative communications. Last week, French institute CEA-Leti and three French universities have launched the Cormoran project, which aims to explore the use of such cooperative interpersonal networks.

fitbit oneThe concept of wireless body area networks (WBANs) isn’t a new one. WBANs could be used to sever the cord between patients and their monitoring equipment. Companies like Apple and Heapslylon are exploring the possibility of connected clothes with embedded sensors. We’ve already begun embracing a new era of wearables, such as Google Glass to Fitbit (see disclosure), designed to become extensions of our senses and movements.

Steve Mann: My “Augmediated” Life - IEEE Spectrum

Steve Mann, a professor in the department of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Toronto, has been designing and wearing computerized eyewear for decades, the gear increasing markedly in sophistication over time.

Steve Mann: My “Augmediated” Life - IEEE Spectrum

Steve Mann, a professor in the department of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Toronto, has been designing and wearing computerized eyewear for decades, the gear increasing markedly in sophistication over time.

Muse: Changing The Way The World Thinks

Muse, InteraXon’s new brainwave-sensing headband, allows you to do more with your mind then ever thought possible. Visit our IndieGoGo crowdfunding campaign page for more details at indiegogo.com/interaxonmuse

Memoto, A Wearable Camera That Documents Your Life
Memoto is a tiny wearable camera that documents the wearer’s life by automatically taking a photo every 30 seconds (video). The 1.5 inch square, 5 megapixel camera has no buttons or controls, and automatically begins taking photos whenever it is clipped on by the wearer. The photos are tagged with time stamps and location (thanks to built-in GPS), and can be browsed and shared via an iPhone or Android app. The camera’s rechargeable battery allows it to take photos continuously for 2 days (that’s 4,000 photos) before it needs to be connected to a computer for charging and uploading to Memoto’s servers. Memoto’s Swedish designers are currently developing the camera for manufacture. They are pre-selling Memoto on Kickstarter. The camera is expected to ship in February, 2013.)

Memoto, A Wearable Camera That Documents Your Life

Memoto is a tiny wearable camera that documents the wearer’s life by automatically taking a photo every 30 seconds (video). The 1.5 inch square, 5 megapixel camera has no buttons or controls, and automatically begins taking photos whenever it is clipped on by the wearer. The photos are tagged with time stamps and location (thanks to built-in GPS), and can be browsed and shared via an iPhone or Android app. The camera’s rechargeable battery allows it to take photos continuously for 2 days (that’s 4,000 photos) before it needs to be connected to a computer for charging and uploading to Memoto’s servers. Memoto’s Swedish designers are currently developing the camera for manufacture. They are pre-selling Memoto on Kickstarter. The camera is expected to ship in February, 2013.)

(via laughingsquid)

Digital Health is a Long Distance Race, For Dot-Com Veteran BodyMedia
One of the top trends in digital health is wearable body sensors. The Nike+ sensor shoe is the Usain Bolt of this market, with its flashy image and impressive results. Startup Fitbit has also gained a lot of traction, with its small clip-on device. But still in the race for gold is a dot-com veteran, BodyMedia. It’s been producing “senseware” since 1999! A recent $12 million funding round suggests that BodyMedia has plenty of legs left.
BodyMedia’s core product is an armband that has four sensors to track movement, temperature, heat and “skin response.” The data is then processed and analyzed by an online “Activity Manager” and a variety of specialist mobile apps, such as a food log. The whole set-up is called BodyMedia FIT and the company terms it an “on-body monitoring system.” Putting it simply though, BodyMedia helps users count calories and lose weight.

Digital Health is a Long Distance Race, For Dot-Com Veteran BodyMedia

One of the top trends in digital health is wearable body sensors. The Nike+ sensor shoe is the Usain Bolt of this market, with its flashy image and impressive results. Startup Fitbit has also gained a lot of traction, with its small clip-on device. But still in the race for gold is a dot-com veteran, BodyMedia. It’s been producing “senseware” since 1999! A recent $12 million funding round suggests that BodyMedia has plenty of legs left.

BodyMedia’s core product is an armband that has four sensors to track movement, temperature, heat and “skin response.” The data is then processed and analyzed by an online “Activity Manager” and a variety of specialist mobile apps, such as a food log. The whole set-up is called BodyMedia FIT and the company terms it an “on-body monitoring system.” Putting it simply though, BodyMedia helps users count calories and lose weight.

Google’s Project Glass: Envisioning the business boost | Cutting Edge - CNET News
Skeptical about smart glasses that would augment your visual reality with data on the fly? You should be. But it is worth pondering some potential business uses for these newfangled glasses.

Google’s Project Glass: Envisioning the business boost | Cutting Edge - CNET News

Skeptical about smart glasses that would augment your visual reality with data on the fly? You should be. But it is worth pondering some potential business uses for these newfangled glasses.

Citizen Sensor | DIY Environmental Monitoring — Development Blog
Citizen Sensor is DIY, wearable, reconfigurable sensor pack and data contextualization system that allows users to collect, share, and understand data using sensors recording environmental conditions such as carbon monoxide, light, noise pollution, and methane gas exposure among others. Users choose what to sense, and then connect with others around the world to share knowledge and experience. We want to empower the general public to learn more about their own personal space and measure where we live and play on a daily basis. 

Citizen Sensor | DIY Environmental Monitoring — Development Blog

Citizen Sensor is DIY, wearable, reconfigurable sensor pack and data contextualization system that allows users to collect, share, and understand data using sensors recording environmental conditions such as carbon monoxide, light, noise pollution, and methane gas exposure among others. Users choose what to sense, and then connect with others around the world to share knowledge and experience. We want to empower the general public to learn more about their own personal space and measure where we live and play on a daily basis. 

Cufflinks with Wi-Fi hot spot turn you into a digital 007 | CNET
These silver oval ‘links keep your cuffs together without the  embarrassment of using some silly analog plastic buttons, and also  double as a USB thumbdrive with 2GB of storage and an embedded wireless  hot spot.
They can be used to share data and Internet access between smartphones, tablets, laptops, and just about anything else that’s USB- or wireless-compatible.

Cufflinks with Wi-Fi hot spot turn you into a digital 007 | CNET

These silver oval ‘links keep your cuffs together without the embarrassment of using some silly analog plastic buttons, and also double as a USB thumbdrive with 2GB of storage and an embedded wireless hot spot.

They can be used to share data and Internet access between smartphones, tablets, laptops, and just about anything else that’s USB- or wireless-compatible.

Meanwhile, Mark Rolston of frog design (which famously helped design the original Macintosh) talked about how computers and other advanced technology are already beginning to disappear into our surroundings and devices, and that he expects this to accelerate in the future. Rolston said that it doesn’t take much to think about combining voice technology, like the kind Apple has in Siri, with the kind of processing power we have now to create a computer that uses any available surface (a wall, a mirror, etc.) as a screen.

Rolston imagines an extension of the kind of physical interface that Microsoft’s Kinect uses, where gestures and even facial recognition could be used to control all kinds of processes or devices and where computing power behind the scenes would allow us to interact with our homes in different ways. Computers would become “externalized resources in a room.” In that kind of environment, Rolston said, “I can talk at it and wave at it, and maybe I have a keyboard or maybe there are screens or cameras around, but [the computers] compose in the moment as we need them.”

Basis Reveals An Awesome New Affordable Heart And Health Tracker You Can Wear On Your Wrist | TechCrunch
Basis Science has been able to  continue their year-long research and design development of a new  affordable heart and health monitor that can be worn all the live-long  day right on your wrist. In anticipation of its showcase at Health 2.0,  the startup is today revealing the design and features of its so-called  “B1 Basis Band” that will launch in the market later this year.

Basis Reveals An Awesome New Affordable Heart And Health Tracker You Can Wear On Your Wrist | TechCrunch

Basis Science has been able to continue their year-long research and design development of a new affordable heart and health monitor that can be worn all the live-long day right on your wrist. In anticipation of its showcase at Health 2.0, the startup is today revealing the design and features of its so-called “B1 Basis Band” that will launch in the market later this year.

Body  acoustics can turn your arm into a touchscreen -  New Scientist
Called Skinput, the system is a marriage of two technologies: the ability to detect the ultralow-frequency sound produced by tapping the skin with a finger, and the microchip-sized “pico” projectors now found in some cellphones.

Body acoustics can turn your arm into a touchscreen -  New Scientist

Called Skinput, the system is a marriage of two technologies: the ability to detect the ultralow-frequency sound produced by tapping the skin with a finger, and the microchip-sized “pico” projectors now found in some cellphones.