smartercities:

World’s first hybrid wind/current generator could generate double the power | Treehugger
Combining a three-bladed Darrieus turbine on top, a Savonius turbine underneath, and a generator in between, the SKWID power generation concept is claimed to be the world’s first hybrid system “capable of maximizing the harvesting of ocean energy from wind and current”.

smartercities:

World’s first hybrid wind/current generator could generate double the power | Treehugger

Combining a three-bladed Darrieus turbine on top, a Savonius turbine underneath, and a generator in between, the SKWID power generation concept is claimed to be the world’s first hybrid system “capable of maximizing the harvesting of ocean energy from wind and current”.

China’s push to install more wind energy capacity has started paying off. Data from the China Wind Energy Association (CWEA) revealed that in 2012, wind energy overtook nuclear power for the very first time to become the country’s third largest source of electricity. The leading two are coal and hydro-electric power. Since 2007, electricity generation through nuclear power has risen by approximately ten percent annually. In comparison, the development of wind energy has grown by an astonishing 80 percent per year. Wind farms across China produced 100.4 terawatt hours of electricity in 2012 – that represents two percent more than that generated by nuclear power. Ambitious renewable energy targets have spurred the growth of China’s wind energy initiative, and the gap with nuclear power is expected to widen significantly over the coming years.

89-Year-Old Man Develops Bladeless Bird-Friendly Wind Turbine
Wind turbines transform moving air currents into clean energy; there isn’t much to hate about that, especially when compared to the toxic emissions and high cost of fossil fuels. But wildlife conservation organizations have often expressed concerns that wind farms pose a threat to flying species bird and bat species. Eighty-nine-year-old military veteran Raymond Green decided that there’s no reason why clean energy and birds can’t coexist, so he designed the Catching Wind Power device, a bladeless wind turbine that promises to harness wind energy without harming our feathered friends.

89-Year-Old Man Develops Bladeless Bird-Friendly Wind Turbine

Wind turbines transform moving air currents into clean energy; there isn’t much to hate about that, especially when compared to the toxic emissions and high cost of fossil fuels. But wildlife conservation organizations have often expressed concerns that wind farms pose a threat to flying species bird and bat species. Eighty-nine-year-old military veteran Raymond Green decided that there’s no reason why clean energy and birds can’t coexist, so he designed the Catching Wind Power device, a bladeless wind turbine that promises to harness wind energy without harming our feathered friends.


(via studio630)

How Offshore Wind Can Power New York And Boston | Sustainable Cities Collective
Here’s something we didn’t know about offshore wind: Unlike land-based wind, which tends to blow strongest at night and in the early morning hours — when energy demand is low — offshore wind usually peaks during the day, when demand is highest.
Just one more reason, argue Stanford University scientists in a new paper [PDF], to get to work on reaping the vast bounty of power off the East Coast of the United States.
And we do mean vast.
The Stanford team determined that after taking into account typical transmission losses and inefficiencies common to offshore turbine arrays, “the U.S. East Coast offshore winds were found to produce from 965 to 1,372 terawatt hours of electricity annually, enough to satisfy the demands of one-third of the United States, or all of the East Coast, from Florida to Maine.”

How Offshore Wind Can Power New York And Boston | Sustainable Cities Collective

Here’s something we didn’t know about offshore wind: Unlike land-based wind, which tends to blow strongest at night and in the early morning hours — when energy demand is low — offshore wind usually peaks during the day, when demand is highest.

Just one more reason, argue Stanford University scientists in a new paper [PDF], to get to work on reaping the vast bounty of power off the East Coast of the United States.

And we do mean vast.

The Stanford team determined that after taking into account typical transmission losses and inefficiencies common to offshore turbine arrays, “the U.S. East Coast offshore winds were found to produce from 965 to 1,372 terawatt hours of electricity annually, enough to satisfy the demands of one-third of the United States, or all of the East Coast, from Florida to Maine.”

jtotheizzoe:

Winds of Change for U.S. Electricity

This is what an innovative energy policy looks like. Wind energy was second only to natural gas in new energy projects in 2011. This is just fantastic news for green energy and shows real progress in moving toward clean electricity and trying to reduce our impact on the climate.

Be sure to check out the full report from the Department of Energy, with lots more infographic goodness.

Next generation Cargo Ship with 50m high sails uses 30% less fuel

The aim of the Wind Challenger Project is to substantially reduce fuel consumption by large merchant vessels. Under development by a group including members from the University of Tokyo, the idea is to utilize giant retractable sails, 20m wide by 50m high, to make maximal use of wind energy. The group has done simulations for shipping routes such as Yokohama-Seattle. The results indicate that hybrid ships with sails and engines could reduce annual fuel consumption by about 30% on average. […]

[more]

via futurescope:

(via futurescope)

Making Cheaper, Better Windmills | Fast Company
GOAL: Cheaper, Better Windmills
PROJECT: Makani Airborne Wind Turbine (aka the Flying Windmill)
ThesisWind power can be cheaper than solar and greener than coal, which bodes well for the $77 billion (and counting) annual market. But turbines are clunky and expensive—both huge barriers to adoption. So what if they soared like kites?
MethodMakani built a carbon-fiber wing, with triblade propellers to mimic traditional windmills. The gizmo, which flies in circles, is tethered to the ground by a wire that transmits the electricity its propellers generate. Onboard sensors and a computer chip work automatically to direct its path. “Once the blade gets high enough, it can coast without help from a motor,” says CEO Corwin Hardham. “It flies by hitting the wind flow perpendicularly, like a kite.”

Making Cheaper, Better Windmills | Fast Company

GOAL: Cheaper, Better Windmills

PROJECT: Makani Airborne Wind Turbine (aka the Flying Windmill)

Thesis
Wind power can be cheaper than solar and greener than coal, which bodes well for the $77 billion (and counting) annual market. But turbines are clunky and expensive—both huge barriers to adoption. So what if they soared like kites?

Method
Makani built a carbon-fiber wing, with triblade propellers to mimic traditional windmills. The gizmo, which flies in circles, is tethered to the ground by a wire that transmits the electricity its propellers generate. Onboard sensors and a computer chip work automatically to direct its path. “Once the blade gets high enough, it can coast without help from a motor,” says CEO Corwin Hardham. “It flies by hitting the wind flow perpendicularly, like a kite.”

A visual representation of renewable energy growth in the U.S. | Grist

…here’s a U.S. map of non-hydro renewable energy installations built or planned today:
So: lots more, lots bigger, and lots more variety. I’m sure most Grist readers knew this was happening on some level, but it’s nice to have a visual representation.
The point the B&V analyst takes from that is that Solyndra is a sideshow. It’s not going to stop the march of renewables in the U.S. And that’s undoubtedly true. The point I take, of course, is that this growth is impressive but not nearly fast enough. In 10 years, I want the gray U.S. map to be invisible beneath a blanket of multi-colored dots. Get on it, people!

A visual representation of renewable energy growth in the U.S. | Grist

here’s a U.S. map of non-hydro renewable energy installations built or planned today:

So: lots more, lots bigger, and lots more variety. I’m sure most Grist readers knew this was happening on some level, but it’s nice to have a visual representation.

The point the B&V analyst takes from that is that Solyndra is a sideshow. It’s not going to stop the march of renewables in the U.S. And that’s undoubtedly true. The point I take, of course, is that this growth is impressive but not nearly fast enough. In 10 years, I want the gray U.S. map to be invisible beneath a blanket of multi-colored dots. Get on it, people!

IBM’s big data helps Vestas wind turbines crank | CNET News
A wind farm in North Dakota
(Credit: Google )
In a classic pairing of IT and renewable energy, an IBM supercomputer  will optimize placement of wind turbines to improve performance.

IBM’s big data helps Vestas wind turbines crank | CNET News

A wind farm in North Dakota

(Credit: Google )

In a classic pairing of IT and renewable energy, an IBM supercomputer will optimize placement of wind turbines to improve performance.


Japanese breakthrough will make wind power cheaper than nuclearA surprising aerodynamic innovation in wind turbine design called the ‘wind lens’ could triple the output of a typical wind turbine, making it less costly than nuclear power.

via mothernaturenetwork:

Japanese breakthrough will make wind power cheaper than nuclear
A surprising aerodynamic innovation in wind turbine design called the ‘wind lens’ could triple the output of a typical wind turbine, making it less costly than nuclear power.

via mothernaturenetwork:

(via electricpower)