Report Finds Connected Devices, Not Phones, Leading the Explosion in Mobile Wireless
Source: ReadWriteWeb
As Sharma observes, the mobile market crossed a number of important  thresholds in the last quarter of 2010.  Mobile subscriptions crossed  the 100% penetration mark, for example.  And smartphone shipments exceeded PC shipments for the first time.
But it’s important to note that these new mobile subscriptions aren’t  all phones.  In fact, the shape of the subscription market is changing  quite dramatically, with connected devices outpacing the growth of paid  and prepaid subscriptions quite dramatically.  Connected devices -  tablets, e-readers, and so on - are now 7% of subscriptions.  That  category isn’t simply the fastest growing; Sharma also predicts that  this will soon become the most profitable.  By the end of this year,  connected devices will command double digit market share.

Report Finds Connected Devices, Not Phones, Leading the Explosion in Mobile Wireless

Source: ReadWriteWeb

As Sharma observes, the mobile market crossed a number of important thresholds in the last quarter of 2010. Mobile subscriptions crossed the 100% penetration mark, for example. And smartphone shipments exceeded PC shipments for the first time.

But it’s important to note that these new mobile subscriptions aren’t all phones. In fact, the shape of the subscription market is changing quite dramatically, with connected devices outpacing the growth of paid and prepaid subscriptions quite dramatically. Connected devices - tablets, e-readers, and so on - are now 7% of subscriptions. That category isn’t simply the fastest growing; Sharma also predicts that this will soon become the most profitable. By the end of this year, connected devices will command double digit market share.

President Obama Details Plan to Win the Future through Expanded Wireless Access

Initiative expands wireless coverage to 98% of Americans, reduces deficit by nearly $10 billion, invests in nationwide public safety network

WASHINGTON—President Barack Obama will today detail his plan to win the future by catalyzing the buildout of high-speed wireless services that will enable businesses to grow faster, students to learn more, and public safety officials to access state-of-the-art, secure, nationwide, and interoperable mobile communications.

In his State of the Union address, President Obama called for a National Wireless Initiative to make available high-speed wireless services to at least 98 percent of Americans. The Wireless Innovation and Infrastructure Initiative laid out today will make it possible for businesses to achieve that goal, while freeing up spectrum through incentive auctions, spurring innovation, and creating a nationwide, interoperable wireless network for public safety.  It will also reduce the national deficit by approximately $10 billion.

(Read more at ww.whitehouse.gov)

New class of implantable monitoring devices for heart patients

CardioMEMS, which has more than 65 employees, grew out of Georgia Tech research. 
The company’s products combine wireless communications technology with microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication, providing doctors with more information while making monitoring less invasive for patients.
MEMS uses micro-machining fabrication to build electrical and mechanical systems at the micron scale — one-millionth of a meter. Using technology originally developed for the integrated circuit industry, MEMS is an attractive platform for medical devices because mechanical, sensing and computational functions can be placed on a single chip.
CardioMEMS began marketing its first product in 2006: the EndoSure sensor, which measures blood pressure inside a repaired abdominal aortic aneurysm. Implanted along with a stent graft during endovascular repair, this tiny sensor may allow doctors to monitor post-surgery patients more effectively than the CT scans that had previously been used. 

New class of implantable monitoring devices for heart patients

CardioMEMS, which has more than 65 employees, grew out of Georgia Tech research. 

The company’s products combine wireless communications technology with microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication, providing doctors with more information while making monitoring less invasive for patients.

MEMS uses micro-machining fabrication to build electrical and mechanical systems at the micron scale — one-millionth of a meter. Using technology originally developed for the integrated circuit industry, MEMS is an attractive platform for medical devices because mechanical, sensing and computational functions can be placed on a single chip.

CardioMEMS began marketing its first product in 2006: the EndoSure sensor, which measures blood pressure inside a repaired abdominal aortic aneurysm. Implanted along with a stent graft during endovascular repair, this tiny sensor may allow doctors to monitor post-surgery patients more effectively than the CT scans that had previously been used. 

Testing iPod Touch-Based Checkout System The system, called “ZipCheck”, appears to be a modified form of the iPod Touch-based mobile EasyPay system Apple started using last year at its retail stores. The device is wirelessly connected to printers around the store as well  as mini-printers the staff can wear on their belts, for easy receipt  printing. The software in use at Mac stores allows staffers to process  cash transactions, credit and debit cards, and even returns.

Testing iPod Touch-Based Checkout System The system, called “ZipCheck”, appears to be a modified form of the iPod Touch-based mobile EasyPay system Apple started using last year at its retail stores. The device is wirelessly connected to printers around the store as well as mini-printers the staff can wear on their belts, for easy receipt printing. The software in use at Mac stores allows staffers to process cash transactions, credit and debit cards, and even returns.

Mount Everest now ‘wired’ for Internet, ready for Starbucks — Engadget
TeliaSonera subsidiary Ncell has just completed installation of a 3G base station at 5,200 meters (17,000 feet) that will reach the 8,848-meter peak of Mount Everest. Mind you, we’ve already seen a cellphone call made from the world’s highest peak using a temporary base station in a Motorola publicity stunt. This time, however, it’s permanent and faster allowing climbers to surf the internet or make 3G video calls. Why would Ncell want to build a base station in such a sparsely populated area? Because it is there.  

Mount Everest now ‘wired’ for Internet, ready for Starbucks — Engadget

TeliaSonera subsidiary Ncell has just completed installation of a 3G base station at 5,200 meters (17,000 feet) that will reach the 8,848-meter peak of Mount Everest. Mind you, we’ve already seen a cellphone call made from the world’s highest peak using a temporary base station in a Motorola publicity stunt. This time, however, it’s permanent and faster allowing climbers to surf the internet or make 3G video calls. Why would Ncell want to build a base station in such a sparsely populated area? Because it is there.  

FCC’s Whitespace Ruling: The Real Wi-Fi Revolution Is About to Happen

A powerful whitespace system could transform, say, a university campus from a clutch of disparate Wi-fi hotspots into a campus-wide wireless signal field. But Genachowski’s bigger thinking may seem atypical to cynics used to line-toeing government officials: He notes “this will also be a platform for innovators and entrepreneurs. There is every chance of this leading to the development of one or more billion-dollar industries.”

What’s he talking about? Things like:

  • Wireless broadband cover for rural areas, whose farmsteads are far from local cable routes.
  • Super-powered smart electric grids.
  • Wireless-connected cars that can alert drivers to upcoming local road hazards or traffic jams.
  • Smart advertising hoardings that detect your smartphone walking by, and tailor ads for you.
courtenaybird:

“The contemporary convergence of mobile phone, camera, wireless Internet and satellite communication — the key ingredients of the digital handheld — accelerates the reconstitution of place from real, occupied space to a collage of here and there, past and present. But digital technology’s effects do not only blast us out of place; they also bore us into the sights right in front of us — those in our viewfinder. Our sense of place is augmented by information wired from the World Wide Web.” (via MobileBehavior)

courtenaybird:

“The contemporary convergence of mobile phone, camera, wireless Internet and satellite communication — the key ingredients of the digital handheld — accelerates the reconstitution of place from real, occupied space to a collage of here and there, past and present. But digital technology’s effects do not only blast us out of place; they also bore us into the sights right in front of us — those in our viewfinder. Our sense of place is augmented by information wired from the World Wide Web.” (via MobileBehavior)

High-Speed  Wireless Transforms a Shipyard - WSJ.com
But over the past few months, Hyundai Heavy deployed a high-speed wireless network across the yard, one of the first such installations in an industrial setting anywhere in the world. Data zips around the complex at four megabits per second, about four times as fast as on a cable modem that is common in U.S. homes. Now, the company can use radio sensors to track the movements of parts as they go from fabrication shop to the side of a drydock and onto a ship under construction. Workers on a vessel can also access plans via notebook computers or handheld phones and hold two-way video conversations with ship designers in the office more than a mile away. 

High-Speed Wireless Transforms a Shipyard - WSJ.com

But over the past few months, Hyundai Heavy deployed a high-speed wireless network across the yard, one of the first such installations in an industrial setting anywhere in the world. Data zips around the complex at four megabits per second, about four times as fast as on a cable modem that is common in U.S. homes. Now, the company can use radio sensors to track the movements of parts as they go from fabrication shop to the side of a drydock and onto a ship under construction. Workers on a vessel can also access plans via notebook computers or handheld phones and hold two-way video conversations with ship designers in the office more than a mile away. 

The use of light waves could be a convenient high-speed alternative to present-day WiFi networks. Researchers in Germany have set a new speed record in the race to send data across light waves. The breakthrough heralds the day when domestic light fixtures will double as broadband transmitters. “The advantage is that you’d be using light that is already there,” says Dr. Jelena Vučić, a scientist at the Fraunhofer Institute for Telecommunications, Heinrich-Hertz-Institute, in Germany. The use of light waves could be a convenient high-speed alternative to present-day WiFi networks. Work to hammer out a standard in this field is being carried out by the IEEE 802.15.7 task group. The lights used are not the common incandescent and fluorescent bulbs of today, but LED fixtures that are widely expected to become prevalent in the future. Data is transmitted by modulating or flickering the blue spectrum of the light very quickly—so fast that it’s invisible to the eye.

Purdue University researchers have developed a miniature device capable of converting ultrafast laser pulses into bursts of radio-frequency signals, a step toward making wires obsolete for communications in the homes and offices of the future. (via Purdue Newsroom — ‘Microrings’ could nix wires for communications in homes, offices
The wireless house of the future might use a system being developed at  Purdue University that could eliminate wires for communications in  homes, businesses and cars. The researchers designed and built a  miniature device capable of converting ultra fast laser pulses into  bursts of radio-frequency signals using innovative “microring  resonators.” Such an advance could enable all communications, from  high-definition television broadcasts to secure computer connections, to  be transmitted from a single base station.

Purdue University researchers have developed a miniature device capable of converting ultrafast laser pulses into bursts of radio-frequency signals, a step toward making wires obsolete for communications in the homes and offices of the future. (via Purdue Newsroom — ‘Microrings’ could nix wires for communications in homes, offices

The wireless house of the future might use a system being developed at Purdue University that could eliminate wires for communications in homes, businesses and cars. The researchers designed and built a miniature device capable of converting ultra fast laser pulses into bursts of radio-frequency signals using innovative “microring resonators.” Such an advance could enable all communications, from high-definition television broadcasts to secure computer connections, to be transmitted from a single base station.

electricpower:

Haier’s Completely Wireless TV Hands On: No Cables For Video… or Power
Wireless power has gone from lab prototype to working product in a little over 18 months, and Haier stuck MIT’s WiTricity into a TV along with WHDI wireless video for complete wirelessness. Complete. Wireless. Ness.
Sure, there’s a big power unit on the wall, radiating (totally harmless) RF into the back of the TV, which has a coil inside to receive the juice. It only delivers full strength if it’s parallel, so you have to plan ahead and somehow setup the TV in front of the wall that has the power module. Because of all the hocus pocus, the TV itself is a chunkster, and that power transmitter is no slim jim either.
Still, the idea is a good one, and the promise—as both MIT and Intel work their asses off getting wireless power up to snuff—is real.
WHDI is a lot further along in development. Wireless HDMI isn’t exactly household, but the tech is now supported by basically all of the biggest CE companies except Panasonic. I’m not going to buy this Haier TV—it might not even be for sale this year—but it’s a concrete sign of what’s to come.
Gizmodo

electricpower:

Haier’s Completely Wireless TV Hands On: No Cables For Video… or Power

Wireless power has gone from lab prototype to working product in a little over 18 months, and Haier stuck MIT’s WiTricity into a TV along with WHDI wireless video for complete wirelessness. Complete. Wireless. Ness.

Sure, there’s a big power unit on the wall, radiating (totally harmless) RF into the back of the TV, which has a coil inside to receive the juice. It only delivers full strength if it’s parallel, so you have to plan ahead and somehow setup the TV in front of the wall that has the power module. Because of all the hocus pocus, the TV itself is a chunkster, and that power transmitter is no slim jim either.

Still, the idea is a good one, and the promise—as both MIT and Intel work their asses off getting wireless power up to snuff—is real.

WHDI is a lot further along in development. Wireless HDMI isn’t exactly household, but the tech is now supported by basically all of the biggest CE companies except Panasonic. I’m not going to buy this Haier TV—it might not even be for sale this year—but it’s a concrete sign of what’s to come.

Gizmodo