What do social media experts do all day?
… [the] crowded free-for-all for eyeballs is the driving factor for an entire industry of social media professionals, a group of internet-savvy, primarily young people charged with mastering media that are so new, most colleges don’t even offer courses on how to use them.
But what these attention wranglers actually do all day remains something of a mystery to those who don’t work in the industry. After all, the allure of social media is that it’s open to anyone who wants to participate. How, then, does one differentiate between an expert and the more than 800 million amateurs who log into Facebook each day?
… while the actual act of pushing out a tweet or posting something on Facebook takes a relatively short period of time, social media managers spend countless hours monitoring the internet in search of trends to chat about and customer comments in need of response.
 (via Huge Social Media Manager Does All Day - Business Insider)

What do social media experts do all day?

… [the] crowded free-for-all for eyeballs is the driving factor for an entire industry of social media professionals, a group of internet-savvy, primarily young people charged with mastering media that are so new, most colleges don’t even offer courses on how to use them.

But what these attention wranglers actually do all day remains something of a mystery to those who don’t work in the industry. After all, the allure of social media is that it’s open to anyone who wants to participate. How, then, does one differentiate between an expert and the more than 800 million amateurs who log into Facebook each day?

… while the actual act of pushing out a tweet or posting something on Facebook takes a relatively short period of time, social media managers spend countless hours monitoring the internet in search of trends to chat about and customer comments in need of response.


(via Huge Social Media Manager Does All Day - Business Insider)

(via ibmsocialbiz)

How crowd-sourced work needs to change

The current system for “crowd work” leads to diminishing pay and skills for simply completing small, homogenous tasks:

crowdwork_current

A better system would draw on knowledge of organizational principles and distributed computing to support complex, creative and interdependent work:

crowdwork_future

Via Follow the Crowd

ibmsocialbiz:

Employees should be externally engaged in a manner that maximizes the benefits of becoming a social business. 
Don’t depend on community managers. Employees know the company the best, they have vested interest in good outcomes for the organization, and they’re the most scalable resource the company has directly in hand.
Via Dion Hinchcliffe, How To Accelerate Social Business Using Employee Advocates 

ibmsocialbiz:

Employees should be externally engaged in a manner that maximizes the benefits of becoming a social business.

Don’t depend on community managers. Employees know the company the best, they have vested interest in good outcomes for the organization, and they’re the most scalable resource the company has directly in hand.

Via Dion Hinchcliffe, How To Accelerate Social Business Using Employee Advocates 

7 Examples: Put Gamification To Work - The BrainYard
Social Business: Game On
Gamification is the art, and sometimes science, of applying game theory and mechanics in non-game contexts. Businesses have used game mechanics for years—often in training and human resources settings—to provide users with incentives to perform particular (and, quite often, tedious) tasks. Now, with the rise of social networking in the workplace, the game, as they say, is really on.
Gamification has been used in business settings in the past, but users were often playing in a vacuum—or their success at “the game” was only visible to a manager. Think of a human resources application, where a user could earn points for every training document he or she read. The person’s score might make a difference in his or her next performance evaluation, but the gaming model did not leverage what really makes people engage in games—the human desire to compete, against others and against themselves.
That’s where social networking comes into play (pun intended). Organizations are using social networking platforms externally—for marketing, customer service, and product development—and internally—for workflow management and collaboration. In environments where people are already sharing and linking to each other, gamification is a natural fit. Now, users are competing against each other for points, or badges or to be known as a leader. Status is clearly visible, so even when users are not competing against each other, there is still incentive to achieve.
The gamification model integrated into social business applications often includes badges showing different levels of achievement, progress bars and meters, points and other rewards that can be earned, loyalty awards, and leader boards.
The market for gamification is expected to grow significantly in the next few years. Research from Gartner indicates that by 2015, 50% of organizations that manage innovation processes will gamify those processes, and that by 2014 more than 70% of Global 2000 organizations will have at least one gamified application.

7 Examples: Put Gamification To Work - The BrainYard

Social Business: Game On

Gamification is the art, and sometimes science, of applying game theory and mechanics in non-game contexts. Businesses have used game mechanics for years—often in training and human resources settings—to provide users with incentives to perform particular (and, quite often, tedious) tasks. Now, with the rise of social networking in the workplace, the game, as they say, is really on.

Gamification has been used in business settings in the past, but users were often playing in a vacuum—or their success at “the game” was only visible to a manager. Think of a human resources application, where a user could earn points for every training document he or she read. The person’s score might make a difference in his or her next performance evaluation, but the gaming model did not leverage what really makes people engage in games—the human desire to compete, against others and against themselves.

That’s where social networking comes into play (pun intended). Organizations are using social networking platforms externally—for marketing, customer service, and product development—and internally—for workflow management and collaboration. In environments where people are already sharing and linking to each other, gamification is a natural fit. Now, users are competing against each other for points, or badges or to be known as a leader. Status is clearly visible, so even when users are not competing against each other, there is still incentive to achieve.

The gamification model integrated into social business applications often includes badges showing different levels of achievement, progress bars and meters, points and other rewards that can be earned, loyalty awards, and leader boards.

The market for gamification is expected to grow significantly in the next few years. Research from Gartner indicates that by 2015, 50% of organizations that manage innovation processes will gamify those processes, and that by 2014 more than 70% of Global 2000 organizations will have at least one gamified application.

How the iPad Is Changing Education | ReadWriteWeb

The iPad may only be two years old, but it’s already begun to change many things. Reading is one of them. Work is another. It is selling like crazy, but it will be some time before most of the people you know own a tablet.

The market for this type of device may only be in its infancy, but it’s already becoming clear how it will revolutionize certain aspects our lives. Education is a huge one, as recent developments have demonstrated.

In January, Apple made good on its late CEO’s vision to enter the digital textbook market with the launch of iBooks 2 and the iBooks Author production tool for e-books. That early effort was met with mixed reactions. While some were excited to see Apple move into a space that’s ripe for disruption, others pointed out the inherent limitations in Apple’s model, which for starters, will be cost-prohibitive for many school districts.

The iPad: An Obvious Use Case for Education

In a way, Apple didn’t enter the education market. Rather, it followed its customers there. By the time iBooks 2 landed in the App Store, many people had already seen the potential the iPad has to change education. A growing number of college students have, on their own accord, made the device a mainstay of their backpacks. More importantly, several school districts wasted no time launching pilot programs to use the iPad in the classroom in a more official way.

Chicago’s public school district was one of those early adopters, having brought iPads into a number of its classrooms and even allowing students to take them home. While programs like this can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to implement, they can ultimately save districts money on textbooks, since e-books are cheaper than their printed counterparts. And of course, an iPad is considerably lighter than a bag full of textbooks.

The resume of the future should enable candidates to tell their story without the limitations of a plain text document. Profiles will be an interactive experience with rich content that should adapt and dynamically direct viewers to relevant skills, strengths and accomplishments based on the viewers needs.

Tablet adoption is increasing among corporate tech buyers. ChangeWave Research recently polled a group of 1,604 business IT buyers and found that 22 percent of them planned to purchase tablets for their employees sometime in the second quarter of 2012. Of those, 84 percent say they’re likely to buy Apple iPads — an increase of 7 percentage points from ChangeWave’s November 2011 survey.

Why You Have Your Best Ideas When You’re Least Productive | Gizmodo

Researchers have been studying how innovation and creativity varies with circadian rhythms—the natural patterns that make you a morning person or an evening type—and the findings are suprising. A lot of studies have shown that we perform best—or at least, get most done—during peak times in our circadian rhythms when we’re most alert. But the new study, by Mareike Wieth and Rose Zacks, reveals that during the lulls in productivity we’re more easily distracted, and that those distractions can help aid creativity. Their conclusion: you have your best ideas when you’re least productive. 

Why You Have Your Best Ideas When You’re Least Productive | Gizmodo

Researchers have been studying how innovation and creativity varies with circadian rhythms—the natural patterns that make you a morning person or an evening type—and the findings are suprising. A lot of studies have shown that we perform best—or at least, get most done—during peak times in our circadian rhythms when we’re most alert. But the new study, by Mareike Wieth and Rose Zacks, reveals that during the lulls in productivity we’re more easily distracted, and that those distractions can help aid creativity. Their conclusion: you have your best ideas when you’re least productive. 

Project Noah Gamifies all that Nature has to Offer | Gamification Blog
Ever wondered what plant rooted itself in your garden, or what strange  bug somehow survived the bitter cold outside to call your house its  home? Or maybe on vacation to warmer reaches, you came across a disturbingly large insect? Some might run the other way, but if you are like me, you’re asking “what the hell is that?” Project Noah brings together a community that can help. It’s been out for over a  year, and Project Noah has already engaged thousands of users in the  age-old game that has attracted the likes of Darwin and Teddy Roosevelt:  discovering and identifying nature’s treasures.
The web app is accessible and well designed, and the experience is also  available on iOS and Android for finding critters in the field.  Gamification features engage users towards contributing regularly. There  is not a leaderboard, but top photos of the day are featured and reward  users for contributing (check out yesterdays winning photo of a whale  shark from user JessyZich). The overall design of the website is excellent, drawing on many of the design philosophies of gamification and engagement.

Project Noah Gamifies all that Nature has to Offer | Gamification Blog

Ever wondered what plant rooted itself in your garden, or what strange bug somehow survived the bitter cold outside to call your house its home? Or maybe on vacation to warmer reaches, you came across a disturbingly large insect? Some might run the other way, but if you are like me, you’re asking “what the hell is that?” Project Noah brings together a community that can help. It’s been out for over a year, and Project Noah has already engaged thousands of users in the age-old game that has attracted the likes of Darwin and Teddy Roosevelt: discovering and identifying nature’s treasures.

The web app is accessible and well designed, and the experience is also available on iOS and Android for finding critters in the field. Gamification features engage users towards contributing regularly. There is not a leaderboard, but top photos of the day are featured and reward users for contributing (check out yesterdays winning photo of a whale shark from user JessyZich). The overall design of the website is excellent, drawing on many of the design philosophies of gamification and engagement.

Welcome to the future of work (by Grind)

Grind is a 22nd century platform that helps talent collaborate
in a new way: outside the system.

It’s a members-only workspace and community dedicated to taking all of the frustrations of working the old way and pulverizing them to a dust so fine it actually oils the wheels of the machine

The Job Creating Potential of Local Food Systems | Sustainable Cities Collective
Jobs, jobs, jobs.  Although the recession is technically over, the  (nonfarm) unemployment rate is holding constant at 9.1% and the American  public are understandably nervous about their ability to find  well-paying middle class jobs.  On the federal front, both the President  and a new crop of potential replacements are pitching their plans to  get America working again.  On the food front, Good Food advocates are  shifting their focus to promote the job-creating potential of the local  food movement.  On the surface, this makes a lot of sense.  Local food  jobs cannot be outsourced, they are Green, the multiplier effect ensures  that more money circulates in the region, and you don’t need to have  years of formal schooling to land one (although sometimes it doesn’t  hurt).  However, often these jobs are low-paying, seasonal, and  physically demanding.  What follows are a few highlights of the local  food system job boon, as well as a reminder that the slogan “will work  for food” can be both a rallying cry and a disheartening sign of the  times.Researchers and Job Searchers Agree
 from the Union of  Concerned Scientists
In  recent months, several key reports have come out that highlight the  prospects of a national strategy focused on food-related job creation.   A summary report recently released by the Union of Concerned Scientists cites numerous  studies to make the case that farmers markets create wealth in a number  of ways. Regional studies such as the those conducted for Northeast Ohio or by Ken Meter at the Crossroads Research Center use input-output models to demonstrate where money in the food system  is leaking out of the region.  These analyses are helpful for  policymakers to determine what areas of the food system need shoring up  in order to ensure that food system jobs and money stay in the region.
via smartercities:

The Job Creating Potential of Local Food Systems | Sustainable Cities Collective

Jobs, jobs, jobs.  Although the recession is technically over, the (nonfarm) unemployment rate is holding constant at 9.1% and the American public are understandably nervous about their ability to find well-paying middle class jobs.  On the federal front, both the President and a new crop of potential replacements are pitching their plans to get America working again.  On the food front, Good Food advocates are shifting their focus to promote the job-creating potential of the local food movement.  On the surface, this makes a lot of sense.  Local food jobs cannot be outsourced, they are Green, the multiplier effect ensures that more money circulates in the region, and you don’t need to have years of formal schooling to land one (although sometimes it doesn’t hurt).  However, often these jobs are low-paying, seasonal, and physically demanding.  What follows are a few highlights of the local food system job boon, as well as a reminder that the slogan “will work for food” can be both a rallying cry and a disheartening sign of the times.

Researchers and Job Searchers Agree

from the Union of
Concerned Scientists

In recent months, several key reports have come out that highlight the prospects of a national strategy focused on food-related job creation.  A summary report recently released by the Union of Concerned Scientists cites numerous studies to make the case that farmers markets create wealth in a number of ways. Regional studies such as the those conducted for Northeast Ohio or by Ken Meter at the Crossroads Research Center use input-output models to demonstrate where money in the food system is leaking out of the region.  These analyses are helpful for policymakers to determine what areas of the food system need shoring up in order to ensure that food system jobs and money stay in the region.

via smartercities: